Quantcast
Jump to content


Customer Experience & Reviews

How was your customer's experience? Customer online reviews including good and bad, consumer complaints, and general customer service discussion. 

162 topics in this forum

    • 7 replies
    • 741 views
    • 4 replies
    • 594 views
    • 12 replies
    • 982 views
    • 22 replies
    • 1,462 views
    • 5 replies
    • 999 views
    • 15 replies
    • 1,238 views
    • 11 replies
    • 989 views
    • 1 reply
    • 731 views
  1. Google Reviews

    • 28 replies
    • 1,234 views
    • 10 replies
    • 760 views
    • 22 replies
    • 1,189 views
    • 16 replies
    • 1,107 views
    • 7 replies
    • 905 views
    • 33 replies
    • 2,055 views
    • 6 replies
    • 1,011 views
    • 10 replies
    • 759 views
    • 0 replies
    • 332 views
    • 35 replies
    • 2,004 views
    • 33 replies
    • 1,474 views
  2. Lugs came loose...

    • 20 replies
    • 1,465 views
  3. Customer Reviews

    • 27 replies
    • 2,345 views
    • 21 replies
    • 1,819 views
    • 13 replies
    • 1,074 views
  4. Angry Customers

    • 17 replies
    • 1,284 views
    • 3 replies
    • 501 views
    • 35 replies
    • 2,948 views
    • 10 replies
    • 888 views
    • 20 replies
    • 1,337 views
    • 9 replies
    • 1,349 views
    • 9 replies
    • 957 views
    • 4 replies
    • 543 views
    • 1 reply
    • 618 views
    • 9 replies
    • 1,513 views
    • 20 replies
    • 1,550 views
  5. follow up calls

    • 6 replies
    • 813 views
    • 10 replies
    • 1,138 views
    • 19 replies
    • 1,306 views
    • 3 replies
    • 574 views
  6. Reception Area

    • 25 replies
    • 2,007 views
    • 23 replies
    • 2,011 views
    • 16 replies
    • 1,248 views
    • 10 replies
    • 1,251 views
    • 10 replies
    • 1,249 views
    • 17 replies
    • 1,369 views
    • 9 replies
    • 855 views
    • 3 replies
    • 2,563 views
  7. Disclaimers on Invoices

    • 2 replies
    • 1,195 views
    • 17 replies
    • 1,690 views
    • 2 replies
    • 988 views
    • 24 replies
    • 2,491 views


  • Upcoming Events

  • Latest Posts

    • Whenever a customer tells you they can’t afford to do the repairs, and they ask you if you can help them out “this one time’”, you need to give careful thought before you lower your price.  First of all, there is a cardinal rule in sales that says before lowering your price, you need to build more value in your service. Yet as we all know, there are going to be some occasions where no matter how good your sales skills are, the customer simply won’t have the ability to pay for the recommended services. In such cases, you and your advisors will have three options. One, you can let the customer walk; two, you can drop your price; or three, you can follow the proven path we have provided to tens of thousands of advisors over the years.  First of all, if you let them walk, both you and the customer have lost. They’ve lost the time they’ve invested in having their vehicle inspected, and when they leave your shop their problems still exist. You’ve lost the marketing dollars you invested in bringing the customer through your door, you’ve lost the time you’ve invested in inspecting the vehicle and estimating the job, and you’ve lost the opportunity to help someone in need.  The second option you have is to lower your price, and while you may close that sale, you’ll also be sending a message to your customer that if they wouldn’t have asked for a discount, they would have paid too much. If that’s not bad enough, it gets worse, because they know if they ever decide to come back they’ll need to negotiate with you, regardless of the prices you quote. The good news is, there’s a third option, and it’s one that’s used by the top shop owners in America with great success….   Putting first things first, you’ll need to see if the customer qualifies for any legitimate discounts you offer, such as Senior Citizen, AAA or Military discounts. You can also limit the number of repairs to the ones they can afford at the time. Another option (which works well in some cases), is to scale back on some of the benefits, such as the length or terms of the warranty. If you and your customer find none of those solutions to be acceptable, you can consider telling them that you will keep their vehicle at your shop (space allowing), and perform the repairs if and when your time allows (when another customer cancels their appointment at the last minute and your tech has the downtime, for example). What your customer would be sacrificing is the immediacy and convenience. Please bear in mind that when making any decision to lower your price, you need to ask yourself who is ultimately going to pay for the discount, because the answer will inevitably be your other customers.  Secondly, if you have the right advisors, with the right principles, they’ll know in their hearts it’s just not right to charge two people different prices for the same service. To put it another way, I’m sure you would not want your mom or dad walking into any business and buying a product or service when you know the customer right before them… paid less.  Never forget, principles, not shell games, lead to two things: higher profits, and the ability to sleep at night knowing you are not playing games… with other people’s money.   Since 1990, Bob Cooper has been the president of Elite Worldwide Inc. (www.EliteWorldwide.com), a company that strives to help shop owners reach their goals and live happier lives, while elevating the industry at the same time. The company offers the industry’s #1 peer group of 90 successful shop owners, training and coaching from top shop owners, service advisor training, along with online and in-class sales, marketing and shop management seminars. You can contact Elite at [email protected], or by calling 800-204-3548.
      View full article
    • We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To continue reading responses, you must be signed in.
    • We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To continue reading responses, you must be signed in.
    • We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To continue reading responses, you must be signed in.
    • We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To continue reading responses, you must be signed in.
    • We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To continue reading responses, you must be signed in.
    • With all the available wifi cameras these days, what is everyone using for shop security? Anyone using Nest, zmodo, d-link, arlo or other? There's a ton of them out there especially on amazon. 
    • We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To continue reading responses, you must be signed in.


×