Quantcast
Jump to content


Recommended Posts

Hello all,

We were recently servicing a vehicle for brake work due to low pedal depression. Vehicle presented with brake pads metal to metal, scored rotors, and 2 seized calipers as well as water in the brake fluid lines.

After replacing the pads, rotors, calipers,  and purging the lines, there was still depression noted. We recommended replacing the brake master cylinder. Customer agreed and part was ordered from the dealer. After installation and purging the lines several times, it appeared slightly better though depression in the pedal was still present. We advised the customer that more time was needed with the vehicle and insisted on taking the vehicle as is cause "we did not know what we were doing". Vehicle was at the shop for about 2-3 days. Payment was made so we could no longer hold the vehicle.

Come to find out, the customer is now suing for the amount of repairs though they are justified as the parts were in need of replacement (we still have the old parts). 

Any suggestions as to how to proceed? 

Thanks for your thoughts and input in advance.

 

- Nick 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Forum Topics

    • Enhanced your vehicle multipoint inspections with Video

      Has any signed up or know of this product? "Truvideo" BG has partnered with a company called Truvideo.  The process allows you to take a short video of the car and document any issues. The video is then sent to the customer, either thru a text message or email. The tech or service advisor narrates the video.  The customer can see on video things like worn brakes, worn tires, a leaking hose, etc.   I think that this has its place in the multipoint process. Below is a link for more information. Your thoughts? https://www.bgprod.com/programs/truvideo/  

      By Joe Marconi, in The Customer Experience

        
      • 7 replies
      • 640 views
    • Mental Health/Depression

      I havent posted here in awhile figured id might get some insight. I am 27 years old, Been in business for 4 years. Over the last year i just feel like ive run out of gas. I am getting depressed, Not interested in working on cars or the business. Its taken a toll on it. Very close tk losing it, I do not want that. Any ideas on what to do?   Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk    

      By defiancetire, in Outside The Shop

      • 5 replies
      • 641 views
    • Billing extra time for seized parts + Rust

      Hello everyone I am new to the service side of the retail auto industry having worked in sales for 5 years. I am now the mechanical department manager of a Carstar collision repair shop. In addition to the usual insurance work, I am starting to take on more customer pay repairs. An issue I keep running into is that because I am located in Canada (South Ontario not far from Detroit) many of the vehicles we work on are severely rusted underneath and many bolts have siezed in place. Many require torches, cutting, drilling, and other unusual disassembly of adjacent components to remove. For example right now I am having a starter replaced on a caravan, and the lower engine mount needs to be removed but is siezed. We needed to apply heat but because it is so close to the rad fan shroud, ended up having to remove the shroud and other items nearby just to attempt to heat and remove the bolt. This ultimately didn't work, and we are now cutting it and drilling it out. Often times using heat causes damage to components. We needed to use heat to cut into a suspension knuckle to remove it after it was damaged from a curb, and ended up destroying a wheel bearing. Abs sensors also commonly need to be snapped off and drilled out because they are just so fused in place. Obviously this gets expensive.    This happens all the time, and as a result the times I am using from shopkey pro and mitchell are not reflective of how long these jobs actually take. On one hand I don't feel it is fair to the customer to charge 2.6 hours for the starter replacement, and another 3 hours to attempting multiple ways to get a bolt out, heating, removing adjacent components, fan shroud R+I... turning a 2.6 hour job into 5.6 hours. On the other hand I understand that this is just the reality of working on vehicles older than a couple years in this part of the country and the customer should be paying for it.    What would you consider standard practice in this situation? I don't want to be eating all this extra time, but I also don't want to have to charge customer hours upon hours additionally because we have to figure out how to unsieze everything.      

      By Savage, in General Automotive Discussion

        
      • 5 replies
      • 764 views
    • Negative review while serving vehicle

      Hello all, Has this ever happened to any of you? We recently went out of our way to accommodate a customers' vehicle repair request. Though the customer was argumentative about pricing, hours charged, parts used etc, they ultimately agreed to the repairs. About an hour or so later, we receive notifications of several 0 or 1 star reviews on many social websites including Yelp, Google, Yahoo, Facebook....... you name it they had an account or made a new account to put their side of the story out there.  How would you handle this? Do you feel obligated to complete the said repair?  Thanks in advance for your thoughts and opinions.   Nick 

      By CAautogroup, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 15 replies
      • 1,143 views
    • Damage to customers vehicle

      How do you handle if a customer comes in a says their windshield wasn't cracked when they brought it in, have a blow out while driving a car, etc?   my techs are noting this on our courtesy inspection if they see any damage prior to service. Today I had a customer return they told me their windshield was cracked on one side when they brought it in but not on the other. I explained to her that we notate all damage and I would be happy to review our security cameras to check. Check the footage and have a clear shot of the tech pulling up with no crack after the repairs. The windshield was replaced earlier this year and the quality is below par as they didn't reinstall the hood trim at the corners of the hood and windshield. My guess is it was cracked at the corner at installation and with the weather changes this week it cracked. This is the first time this customer has been in since 2015. We also have a clause on our invoices that we aren't responsible for fire, theft, articles left in vehicles, any damage or acts of God.    Weve only had this come up a few times over 16 years but wanted everyone's opinion on how you would handle.

      By spencersauto, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 22 replies
      • 1,125 views
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×