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Joe Marconi

4 Words I'm Really Tired of Hearing!

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What are the 4 words I'm tired of?  "It's a leased car"

I don't know about you, we don't fold when someone says to us that they are driving a leased car.  No matter if you own your car or lease it, the car has to be safe for the road and for the occupants. 

They other day, a customer told my service advisor, "I don't believe in ever changing the Cabin Air filter, it's a lease car and leave it alone." My service advisor replied, "Sir, can I at least remove the dead mouse from the filter?"  (See photo below)

Lesson: You got to point out the WHY!  

And yes, he not only authorized the cabin filter, but also paid us to remove the blower motor to clean it out and completely sanitize the car. 

How do you handle customers that tell you, "It's a leased car"

Cabin Filter with mice nest.jpg

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