Quantcast
Jump to content


Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'employee management'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Business & General Discussions
    • General Automotive Discussion
    • Auto Repair Shop Management Help? Post Here!
    • Joe’s Business Tips For Shop Owners
    • Shop Management Coaching, Business Training, Consulting
    • AutoShopOwner Articles
    • Non-Automotive Discussions
    • New Member's Area
    • AutoShopOwner Announcements
  • Automotive Repair Shop Management
    • Marketing, Advertising, & Promoting
    • Banner Programs & Franchising
    • Management Software, Web Sites & Internet
    • Human Resources, Payroll and Training
    • Workflow Management
    • Accounting, Profitability, & Payroll
    • The Customer Experience
    • Automotive Products & Services
    • Exit Strategy, Retirement, Selling Your Repair Shop
  • Regional Automotive Shop Management Discussions
    • Northeast Auto Repair Shop Management
    • Midwest Auto Repair Shop Management
    • South Auto Repair Shop Management
    • West Auto Repair Shop Management
    • Other Region Auto Repair Shop Management
  • Auto Body Collision Shop Business
    • Auto Body Shop Discussions
  • Automotive Repair & Technical Discussions
    • Technician Corner - Discussions
    • Repair/Diagnostic Help & Tech Tips!
    • Automotive Shop Tools & Equipment
  • Automotive Shop Classifieds, Resources & Events
    • Automotive Classifieds
    • Automotive Links of Interest
    • Automotive Events
  • AutoShopOwner Photos & Videos
    • Post Your Shop Photos
    • Photo and Video Topics
  • The Car Count Fixer's Fix Your Car Count.... and more!
  • The Car Count Fixer's New Release
  • Shop Website Help's Website Tips
  • Shop Website Help's Post Your Website

Categories

  • Automotive Advertising
  • Automotive Industry
  • Automotive Customer Service
  • Automotive Management
  • Automotive Marketing
  • Automotive Networking
  • Selling Automotive Repair
  • Gonzo's Tool Box
  • Reviews

Categories

  • Shop Technician Forms
  • Customer Service Forms
  • Management Forms
  • Reports and Publications

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Calendars

  • AutoShopOwner Website Events
  • Automotive Industry Trade Shows
  • Auto Shop Events
  • Car Show Events
  • Webinars
  • Training Events
  • Other Events

Product Groups

  • Membership Packages
  • Advertising

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Type of Business


Website


Certifications

Found 44 results

  1. Shop production is a hot topic these days. High production results in higher sales and profits. But there seems to be so many obstacles to overcome to achieve high production levels. I was discussing production with a few shop owners, and one shop owner mentioned that he recently hired a shop foreman; an “A” tech in his early 50’s. The foreman uses his knowledge and skills to organize the work flow. For younger techs, it’s even more important that they know how to work and keep productive. What are your thoughts? Does anyone else have a foreman or similar position? And how does this role affect production?
  2. The day to day operations of running a business can take its toll on anyone. To be a business owner means to address problem after problem and finding the right solutions. Sometimes the decisions we make will be the right ones, sometimes not. If we are not careful, this emotional roller coaster we call being in business, can make us focus too much on the negative, and not the positive things that happen in our lives. With nearly 4 decades as a business owner, I can say with certainty that one of the basic building blocks of being successful in business is having the right team of people around you and getting yourself in the right frame of mind. You need to find and hire great people. But once you have them, you need to do all you can to take care of them, train them and make them successful in order for you to be successful. Is it easy? No. But it is essential. Most important; you need to treat each day as if it were a gift from the heavens and base your entire perspective from a position of strength and remaining positive. I know it’s not easy, but I can tell you, it works.
  3. Source: Got a bad apple in your Repair Shop? Remove it!
  4. As shop owners, our focus is on business, for the most part. There is nothing wrong with this mindset, but it may push employees away from you. Whether you like it or not, people are more concerned about their own lives and what’s important to them. When speaking to your employees, find ways to engage in conversation that has nothing to do with business. Find out about their interests, and what’s going on in their lives. Simply asking, “How was your weekend? Do anything special?” can work wonders to motivate people. When speaking with employees, be more concerned about them, not you. This will send a message that you care about them as a person. In turn, they will care more about your business.
  5. A shop owner friend called me the other today to complain about one of his technicians. He went on and on about his bad attitude, he comes in late, is always miserable, and brings down the morale of the shop. So I asked him, “Why do you keep him?” He replied, “He’s my best producer” How many times have we heard this story? How many times have you said those exact words? As a shop owner you need to come to terms with the fact that a toxic employee will bring down the entire shop. Making excuses or giving this employee a pass because he’s a great producer is not a valid argument. Eventually, the entire shop will spiral downward. Morale will deteriorate to a point where employees will shut down. In addition, the other employees will begin to question your judgment of people and “your” integrity. You will lose your credibility as owner of the company. When that happens, expect good people to leave. A bad apple will destroy the bunch, and never leave the bushel unless you physically remove it. Once removed, morale will go up and so will production. And don’t be surprised when your other employees come to you and say, “Hey boss, what took you so long?”
  6. If there is one thing I have learned in my 36 years in business, it’s that people make the biggest difference in terms of success. No matter what equipment you have, or tools or information system. It’s the quality of your employees that will determine your success. Think about this. If you were the coach of a football team and your goal was to win the Super Bowl, what would be your first goal? To assemble the best players possible, a team of superstar athletes. The fanciest stadium on the planet does not win games. It takes great players and a great coach. And a great coach understands that he needs to surround himself with superstars. Your repair shop is no different. If you want to attain great success, it will be achieved not only by your work, but by the work of others around you. Your success is truly determined by the having the right people and then by bringing out the best in them.
  7. Perhaps one of the best ways to motivate employees is to give them regular positive feedback. Too often, employees only hear when things go wrong. And while we all need to know when we fail, it’s more important to recognize when things go right. People want to know when they win. People also like to be included in on the progress of the company. It’s important that everyone in your shop feels that what they do really matters to the success of the company. This also promotes the right culture and builds a strong team. Create a strategy where you give your employees feedback on their progress, especially positive feedback. Look for things you can point out that recognizes an action by an employee that resulted in recent success. This will help to reinforce the behavior you are looking for and will increase the odds of repeating that same behavior. The feeling of accomplishment and being recognized for it is a powerful motivator in the workplace, perhaps stronger than money. People want to feel good about themselves. As shop owners, implement this strategy and ignite your workplace toward success. Remember, your success is dependent on the success of the people around.
  8. Lets face it, a week cant go by without a technician comeback or a customer service issue. Mistakes will happen, theres no avoiding it. Obviously, you need to put systems and procedures in place to reduce the chances of mistakes occurring, but the truth is everyone at one time or another we will drop the ball. The key thing to remember when a mistake happens is to keep the lines of communications open. With every mistake there is learning experience that everyone in the shop can benefit from. Discuss the issue with your tech or service advisor. Get all the facts. Dont assign blame; the person who committed the mistake already knows he or she dropped the ball. Draw out of the person ways to improve and ask that person if it would ok to share the findings with the rest of the staff. We all need to adopt the culture of continuous improvement. We can sometime learn more from mistakes then when things go smoothly. One last note; I am not suggesting to ignore habitual mistakes or not recognize when someone refuses to improve or cannot do the job. In some cases you may have to let someone go.
  9. Source: Use technician comebacks and customer service issues to learn and improve
  10. Got your attention? Good. I often hear shop owners say, "I wouldn't ask any employee to do something that I would not do." While this may appear to be effective leadership, lets dig a little deeper. Lets say you had an illness that required a specialist. You make an appointment to see the doctor and the day you walk into his office you find him scrubbing the toilet bowl? In defense of his actions, he says, "I can't ask my employees to do something I am not willing to do." I use this ridiculous analogy only to prove a point. Effective leadership does not mean performing every required task in your company. Nor does it mean that the only way to get others to perform what's expected of them is to also perform their duties. Effective leaders do go the extra mile and mentor the people they lead, but leaders also know what their true role is. And that is to coach their employees, set the goals, work on the business plan, and to ensure the success of the business. As shop owners, clearly define your role as the leader of your company. Delegate tasks when needed and manage your time by working on the tasks that define you, the leader.
  11. Source: Repair Shop Owners; Please dont lead by example!
  12. Source: Improve shop productivity with a Focus on what went right, not what went wrong
  13. Too often we focus on the things that go wrong, and not on the things that go right. Lets face it; everyday things will go wrong. Have you ever watch a professional ball team play an entire game without mistakes being made. A football game where there were no dropped balls? It's more important to focus on the wins, not the losses. I am not suggesting we ignore the mistakes. But if we never recognize what goes right, and only on what goes wrong, we will end up creating a shop culture of negativity. And that will take its toll on production and lost income. Recognize what goes right, understand that mistakes will happen. Use mistakes as a means to improve, not punish. Do this and watch production improve.
  14. Source: Letting go of control of the shop is still so hard to do
  15. Source: You have goals…but what about your employee’s goals?
  16. As a shop owner, you have both business goals and personal goals. Goals are critical to your success. Setting goals is like planning out a trip. Each step is carefully outlined and mapped out. You know where you want to ultimately end up, and you know how you will get there. But what about your employees? Don’t they have goals? Employees may not have sat down and wrote out a detailed plan, but let me assure you, they have goals too. Employees care about their future, their kid’s future and also have wants and desires. My advice is to find out what those goals are, and here’s why. When employees know that you care about their well-being as a person, they will begin to align their goals with your goals. They see the bigger picture; that in order to achieve what they want out of life, they must help you achieve what you want also. But the key here is to make sure you as the shop owner make the first move. Sit down with employees, ask them about their future desires and dreams. Then begin to build your business around not just what you want, but what everyone wants. This also means that you must become profitable enough to be able to continue to compensate your employees at a level that they feel secure in their position. But, it’s never all about the numbers and the dollars. As shop owner, you are also a mentor. And the most important employee-related job you have is understanding your employees and helping them achieve their wants and desires. Motivational Speaker Zig Ziglar once said, “You can get anything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want”
  17. Let’s look at sports for a minute. Take for example two premier quarterbacks. Both equally talented and both equally successful. While they play the position according to the rules of football, neither quarterback plays the position exactly the same. The inherent differences between them allows them to bring out their personal best. They draw upon their uniqueness, which translates into their individual strengths. In essence, this is what makes them great, but different. It’s the same for your technicians, and in fact, for all your employees. Years back I tried to mold my employees to follow a strict set of rules and guidelines. I soon realized that although we need policies and procedures, being different is ok, and doing things differently is ok. With regard to employee management: Set the parameters of your business, establish each job role and clearly describe each position, set the goals for each position, and then let the employee flourish by allowing the employee to bring their uniqueness to their role. Oh, one more thing. Not doing things your way is not the end of the world either. Thoughts?
  18. Years back it was common to hear, "Leave your problems at the door." Essentially that meant that your home life and all its issues should not cross over to work. The truth is, it's not possible to simply turn a switch and forget about what's happening at home. For example, what if a tech's child is sick? What do you think that tech is thinking about throughout the day? Your employees have to know that you care about them as people, not just workers. Recognize that things will occur and there are times when your employees will need your understanding. When the people around you know that you care about them, they will care about you. This builds employee loyalty and a healthy work place.
  19. Maybe it’s the 40 years I have spent in this business, but these days I have little tolerance for certain things. One of those things: Catching a once-trusted employee lying to me. To be fair, the years have also taught me to be more patient, more positive and help bring out the best in others. I find myself going the extra mile, spending time helping others and teaching others what I have learned through the years. In order to be successful in your life, you need to help others around you succeed in their lives. So, perhaps it’s the fact that because I do spend so much time mentoring, I felt betrayed when this young tech did not tell me the truth. After all, look at the opportunity I am giving him? The circumstances are not important. His actions are. When confronted, he openly admitted that he lied. The manager sent him home for a day to think about his actions. He is back at work and “appears” to have gone through an epiphany. But, we shall see. Another thing the last 40 years have taught me: Above all maintain your integrity and core values. Oh, and learn to forgive.
  20. Source: What do you do when a catch an employee in a lie?
  21. I remember watching my son’s little league game, some years ago. A ball was hit into the outfield. The 10 year old centerfielder catches the ball on two bounces and attempts to throw the runner out that was heading home from third base. In the stands a father is screaming at the kid, “Second base! Second Base!” Well, the runner was safe, the kid who hit the ball ended up on second base. The father unloaded a series of rants at the young ball player. The coach, being a smart man, walked over to the father and said, “Sir, the kid made a mistake, he’s young. He thought he was doing the right thing. He doesn’t yet know to throw it to second base to stop the runner from advancing.” Essentially, when people are young and in training, they will make mistakes. And, they really cannot be responsible for things that they do not know. Making a mistake does not always mean someone is wrong. Be patient with young employees. They will make mistakes. The way to minimize the mistakes is training. Lots of training. The company has the obligation to provide continuous training for all employees, especially entry level. Your thoughts?
  22. Imagine two boys playing one-on-one basketball. They’re throwing the ball up, dribbling the ball, making moves, but not keeping score. Then one decides, “Hey let’s keep score.” What happens? We all know what happens. Both boys now play a lot harder; they pay more attention to their shots, they guard the other player with more intensity. They play with a goal in mind…the goal to win. Your shop is no different. We all need to know how we are doing; what’s our score. If your employees don't know how they are doing, there is no incentive to win. And, it's not their fault. They don't know the score. People are more productive when they receive feedback on how they are doing. Point out their accomplishments. Point out their progress. And most important, give everyone positive reinforcement. One thing, don’t make everything about the numbers. If you work on the person and bring out their strengths, the rest will fall into place. Show your employees their accomplishments, let them know their progress, and watch them win.
  23. There has been a lot discussion lately over flat rate and other pay plans. This is a topic that has been brought up before, but appears to be raising concerns among shop owners and techs. What is your experience with pay plans and flat rate?
  24. As a shop owner, it’s common to take on all the tasks of running your business; from the repairs to payroll to paying bills. Everything and anything seems to rest on your shoulders. While it’s admirable to take on all the responsibilities of your business, it can be overwhelming. In fact, in the long run, it will lead to burnout. When burnout occurs, you become ineffective and your business and life will suffer. Learn to delegate certain tasks. Sit down and clearly outline you job description as the owner. Then clearly outline the job role and tasks of everyone you employ. Whether you are a 3 man shop or have 30 employees, the entire weight of your business should not rest squarely on your shoulders. This is not to say you should remove yourself from running the business. You should and need to stay involved with what’s happening each day. But you need to assign certain task to others and then set up a system of reporting that allow you to remain in control without controlling everything.
  25. Every shop needs a balance of technicians at every level. But one thing is for sure, every shop needs at least one superstar A level master technician. And if you don’t think you can afford someone at that level, please think again. An A level tech comes with benefits that other level techs can’t offer you. Now, let’s be sure we are on the same page. My definition of a superstar Tech: An “experienced” tech with a complete set of tools including test equipment (some even have their own scanners), they are an ASE certified Master Tech, they can consistently produce more hours than they are actually at work, have a great attitude, are mentors to the younger techs and will tackle just about anything you throw at them. Now, don’t get me wrong, we all need techs at all levels. And a solid B tech is also very valuable. But, when you are up against a problem, there is nothing better than a superstar tech to come to the rescue. The only issue with a superstar tech? It’s not easy to find them. Another option: home grow your own.


×