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Bringing back lost customers ?


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Hello, I just had a question. How are you guys contacting customers that you have not seen in a while? Are you calling them, sending post cards? Or are you not contacting them at all ? I have a hand full of customers I haven't seen in a while, some have bought new cars but I am curious to what happened with the others. Thanks!

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air filtration

My software sends out email 5 days, 30 days and 90 days -We get email addresses from every. single. customer. Only about 1 in 200 dont have one but I don't believe the, lol. I tell them we don't send junk mail and we email them invoices in case they lose their hard copy

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  • 2 weeks later...

My customer's get a follow up email ~3 days after they are in.  4 months later they start receiving email reminders.  They will continue to receive them every 2 months for 3 years unless they come in or tell me to stop.  Having said that, this yields very little return.  There was a post on this site a while back that talked about how studies showed that reminders in the automotive repair business are not effective anymore.  This has been my experience as well.  We do get a few responses but not many.  At times I send out several hundred and it is not uncommon to get no response.  

The one thing I do not do with my reminders that might make them more effective is to offer a discount, incentive, or something of value.  I have always tried to get customers to see us as professional just like their doctors, dentist, lawyer, and accountant.  None of mine send me coupons, so it seems counterproductive for us to so.  I don't like the discounting game, don't want to be in the race to the bottom, and don't want to attract the discount shoppers.  I will continue to send out the reminders because there is no cost involved, it keeps us in contact with customers and on their minds, and it does yield an appointment from time to time,  But I would never see it as an effective way to recover lost customers.

Scott  

 

      

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1 hour ago, ScottSpec said:

My customer's get a follow up email ~3 days after they are in.  4 months later they start receiving email reminders.  They will continue to receive them every 2 months for 3 years unless they come in or tell me to stop.  Having said that, this yields very little return.  There was a post on this site a while back that talked about how studies showed that reminders in the automotive repair business are not effective anymore.  This has been my experience as well.  We do get a few responses but not many.  At times I send out several hundred and it is not uncommon to get no response.  

The one thing I do not do with my reminders that might make them more effective is to offer a discount, incentive, or something of value.  I have always tried to get customers to see us as professional just like their doctors, dentist, lawyer, and accountant.  None of mine send me coupons, so it seems counterproductive for us to so.  I don't like the discounting game, don't want to be in the race to the bottom, and don't want to attract the discount shoppers.  I will continue to send out the reminders because there is no cost involved, it keeps us in contact with customers and on their minds, and it does yield an appointment from time to time,  But I would never see it as an effective way to recover lost customers.

Scott  

 

      

I like your view of the discounts and I agree. I sent out an email blast to every single customer for a steeply discounted oil change to get people into my new location. I got several appointment within a few hours but the ones that came were interested only in the oil change which is a loss for us.

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We try to think why we haven't seen someone in a while. What did we do wrong? If they deserved firing I forget about them. If they fired me I'll call and try and make things ok. Mostly I try to be more subtle. We are in a small town. if joe smith comes in every 3 months for something and it's been 4 months I'll usually ask someone who knows him about him. Oh hi Mrs. Anderson how's mr smith doing. That's usually enough to get him outta the Walmart quick lane and onto my lift. 

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1 hour ago, alfredauto said:

We try to think why we haven't seen someone in a while. What did we do wrong? If they deserved firing I forget about them. If they fired me I'll call and try and make things ok. Mostly I try to be more subtle. We are in a small town. if joe smith comes in every 3 months for something and it's been 4 months I'll usually ask someone who knows him about him. Oh hi Mrs. Anderson how's mr smith doing. That's usually enough to get him outta the Walmart quick lane and onto my lift. 

Nice! That is one thing we havne't done well at: calling customers that we havent seen. I think customers will appreciate a phone call every once in a while. Either that or be extremely annoyed lol. hopefully its the former

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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