Quantcast
Jump to content









[Brand Choice] Automotive Brake Pads


Alex

Recommended Posts

Automotive Brake Pads

 

What is your preferred brand of automotive brake pads and why?

Who is the supplier of that brake pad to you?

What is the warranty on those pads?

Who manufactures those brake pads?

What grade are those brake pads, low end, mid, high end?

Are they ceramic, semi-metallic, organic, or blend?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is your preferred brand of automotive brake pads and why? NAPA Adaptive One

Who is the supplier of that brake pad to you? NAPA Auto Parts

What is the warranty on those pads? Limited Lifetime - NOT against wear out but the local store will replace them "one time"

Who manufactures those brake pads? Starts with an A, sorry I don't remember at this time.

What grade are those brake pads, low end, mid, high end? VERY high-end

Are they ceramic, semi-metallic, organic, or blend? Hybrid ceramic - different compositions for the inboard and outboard pads to reflect the different temperatures each pad experiences.

 

NAPA Adaptive One brake pads are an ultra-premium brake pad with a premium price so they are hard to sell. In most cases I use Wagner ThermoQuiet brake pads. I always encourage the Adaptive One and that is all I use on my personal vehicles but I like and trust the ThermoQuiets. When properly installed as part of a properly serviced brake job I've never had a noise or performance complaint with either brand of brake pads.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is your preferred brand of automotive brake pads and why? NAPA Adaptive One

Who is the supplier of that brake pad to you? NAPA Auto Parts

What is the warranty on those pads? Limited Lifetime - NOT against wear out but the local store will replace them "one time"

Who manufactures those brake pads? Starts with an A, sorry I don't remember at this time.

What grade are those brake pads, low end, mid, high end? VERY high-end

Are they ceramic, semi-metallic, organic, or blend? Hybrid ceramic - different compositions for the inboard and outboard pads to reflect the different temperatures each pad experiences.

 

NAPA Adaptive One brake pads are an ultra-premium brake pad with a premium price so they are hard to sell. In most cases I use Wagner ThermoQuiet brake pads. I always encourage the Adaptive One and that is all I use on my personal vehicles but I like and trust the ThermoQuiets. When properly installed as part of a properly serviced brake job I've never had a noise or performance complaint with either brand of brake pads.

We use the Adaptive Ones exclusively,they are the only pad we guarantee not to squeak or squeal and our price point is 169.95 installed includes the machining of the rotors.And if they are looking for cheap we send them on down the road as our reputation is more important to us than the few cheap brake jobs we lose out on.We have been using the Adaptive Ones for 2 1/2 years now with zero issues by the way.

Edited by Genuine Car Care
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We use the Adaptive Ones exclusively,they are the only pad we guarantee not to squeak or squeal and our price point is 169.95 installed includes the machining of the rotors.And if they are looking for cheap we send them on down the road as our reputation is more important to us than the few cheap brake jobs we lose out on.We have been using the Adaptive Ones for 2 1/2 years now with zero issues by the way.

 

Why do you undervalue your services lke this? I was just readng another forun about the undervaluing of our services and not getting paid what we're worth and then I read this where you say you're charging barely over list price. Adaptve one pads typcally run $50-70 as set. Labor guides list the average pad replacement at 1 hour and machining rotors at .2-.4 each. So for a complete, properly performed brake job where you clean everything thoroughly, and lubricate whaere appropriate how long does it take you? For your price point either you don't have sufficient parts margin, aren't charging for the work performed or maybe just aren't doing the complete job. OR maybe you aren't flaggin your techs enough time.

 

A friend of mine says he can do a pad slap and turn two rotors in about 45 minutes. Well there is no way on God's green earth that he is doing a complete job in that time. We should do the best job we can possibly do, especially with the most important system on the car. We should charge approprately and get paid for a job well done. I'd really like to hear how you make that price point with Adaptive One pads. I checked my cost on the ADO pads for 9 different cars, four of which I owned or currently own, front and rear pads. The lowest cost was $45 and the highest was $79.00 with an average of $58-62. So I still ask, how are you maintaining proper margins and meeting your price point? If I could do the same, I'd be busy with brake jobs all day, every day. But I refuse to give away my talents and I refuse to cut corners on brake jobs. There is no more inportant system on a vehicle than the brakes. Because after all there is no greater leap of faith than when you step on that brake pedal. And a vehicle can't hurt anyone if it won't go, but it sure will if it won't WHOA! I owe my family more than cutting corners on brakes.

 

 

With all due respect and reverence I submit this to you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joe, I am not sure if Carquest marks up the parts from WorldPac or not but I set myself up an account with Worldpac. It doesn't cost me anything and everything that I order before 6:30pm comes to me overnight by 10:30 the next morning and if I spend more than $75 the shipping is free. You may want to look into that. Worldpac is a direct link in my Mitchell1 and I can pull down and order the parts right through my Mitchell1.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why do you undervalue your services lke this? I was just readng another forun about the undervaluing of our services and not getting paid what we're worth and then I read this where you say you're charging barely over list price. Adaptve one pads typcally run $50-70 as set. Labor guides list the average pad replacement at 1 hour and machining rotors at .2-.4 each. So for a complete, properly performed brake job where you clean everything thoroughly, and lubricate whaere appropriate how long does it take you? For your price point either you don't have sufficient parts margin, aren't charging for the work performed or maybe just aren't doing the complete job. OR maybe you aren't flaggin your techs enough time.

 

A friend of mine says he can do a pad slap and turn two rotors in about 45 minutes. Well there is no way on God's green earth that he is doing a complete job in that time. We should do the best job we can possibly do, especially with the most important system on the car. We should charge approprately and get paid for a job well done. I'd really like to hear how you make that price point with Adaptive One pads. I checked my cost on the ADO pads for 9 different cars, four of which I owned or currently own, front and rear pads. The lowest cost was $45 and the highest was $79.00 with an average of $58-62. So I still ask, how are you maintaining proper margins and meeting your price point? If I could do the same, I'd be busy with brake jobs all day, every day. But I refuse to give away my talents and I refuse to cut corners on brake jobs. There is no more inportant system on a vehicle than the brakes. Because after all there is no greater leap of faith than when you step on that brake pedal. And a vehicle can't hurt anyone if it won't go, but it sure will if it won't WHOA! I owe my family more than cutting corners on brakes.

 

 

With all due respect and reverence I submit this to you.

We pay the tech 1 hour for a hang and turn/when I was a tech we were paid .8 for the same job and I promise you I can do a front brake Job properly in well under an hour including replacing or machining and replacing and machining with the on car lathe.. I don't drink coffee and I keep the wrench in my hand and work both sides of the car at the same time,including the lube brush to lube the slides and pins. we pay 51.99 across the board for the adaptive ones and I take smaller margin on the part when I have a package deal.

If I do 4 brake jobs a day at 169.95 it beats the heck out of 2 at 209.95 or 1 at 249.95 .With all due respect you always have to look at the big picture when looking at profits and margins.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We pay the tech 1 hour for a hang and turn/when I was a tech we were paid .8 for the same job and I promise you I can do a front brake Job properly in well under an hour including replacing or machining and replacing and machining with the on car lathe.. I don't drink coffee and I keep the wrench in my hand and work both sides of the car at the same time,including the lube brush to lube the slides and pins. we pay 51.99 across the board for the adaptive ones and I take smaller margin on the part when I have a package deal.

If I do 4 brake jobs a day at 169.95 it beats the heck out of 2 at 209.95 or 1 at 249.95 .With all due respect you always have to look at the big picture when looking at profits and margins.

 

You can believe what you want and do what you want, that's all your customers are willing to pay for. But your definition of a complete brake job and my definition of a complete properly performed brake job are clearly different. There is no way on God's green earth that you are thoroughly cleaning all associated parts (wheel hub, brake rotor and pad abutments), lubricating parts where appropriate, and machining the rotors and installing the brake pads in less than one hour, not one guy.

 

I too work both wheels at a time. I too do not drink coffee, I drink soda but I do not stop what I'm doing to grab a drink. And I do not smoke. In short I am focused on my task until it is done. With an on-car brake lathe you don't have to measure the lateral runout as critically as I do and can resurface rotors faster that is true. But you will not be doing a complete brake job in less than one hour, not completely and properly, it is impossible and anyone who claims they can is a liar. I defy you do demonstrate that capability. But to do a pad slap and iron cut and grease job on a set of pads, sure you can goober it out in less than an hour. And if you are paying your techs 1 hour for a hang and turn that's all you're going to get, a pad slap and iron cut. You will not get a proper, thorough, conscientious brake job.

 

As for the lower mark-up for higher volume, you have a point, if you have the volume available. But a lower price won't necessarily get you a higher volume of customers willing to pay for other legitimate repairs at regular price, like Joe alluded to. You will likely get a higher volume of lower priced customers. And there will be a higher volume of low quality brake jobs out there with premium brake pads. And since when did a critical safety system like brakes become a loss leader?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can believe what you want and do what you want, that's all your customers are willing to pay for. But your definition of a complete brake job and my definition of a complete properly performed brake job are clearly different. There is no way on God's green earth that you are thoroughly cleaning all associated parts (wheel hub, brake rotor and pad abutments), lubricating parts where appropriate, and machining the rotors and installing the brake pads in less than one hour, not one guy.

 

I too work both wheels at a time. I too do not drink coffee, I drink soda but I do not stop what I'm doing to grab a drink. And I do not smoke. In short I am focused on my task until it is done. With an on-car brake lathe you don't have to measure the lateral runout as critically as I do and can resurface rotors faster that is true. But you will not be doing a complete brake job in less than one hour, not completely and properly, it is impossible and anyone who claims they can is a liar. I defy you do demonstrate that capability. But to do a pad slap and iron cut and grease job on a set of pads, sure you can goober it out in less than an hour. And if you are paying your techs 1 hour for a hang and turn that's all you're going to get, a pad slap and iron cut. You will not get a proper, thorough, conscientious brake job.

 

As for the lower mark-up for higher volume, you have a point, if you have the volume available. But a lower price won't necessarily get you a higher volume of customers willing to pay for other legitimate repairs at regular price, like Joe alluded to. You will likely get a higher volume of lower priced customers. And there will be a higher volume of low quality brake jobs out there with premium brake pads. And since when did a critical safety system like brakes become a loss leader?

Well I think I'm going to check out of this discussion at the LIAR part. I will leave you with this, I will continue to do 100-115k per month on my 95 percent repeat customer base and you can carry on with your 2 hour brake jobs and continue to believe that it CAN NOT be done in less than an hour in the end it does not affect me at all.

Edited by Genuine Car Care
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

digging this up

 

I was wondering if anyone here has used the Wearever pads from AAP?

 

 

i have used them a few times on customer cars and my own, usually use the Gold line (oe material and style), and they hold up good. Ceramic on my truck held up good, low dust, no squeaks.

 

and yes i do work for aap, and no im not advertising.

 

while were here, what are your thoughts on wagner pads?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used the the Wearever Gold on several occassions. Wasn't too impressed. Several applications the brakes were noisy. I have had the same problem with the Wagner brand as well. I am still trying several brands but so far have been happy with Oreilly's Brake best select brand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
I see I have been paying more than most of you. Our brake jobs, not counting rotors usually from $200 to $250 plus a hydraulic brake flush. If you believe in your value, you can sell it. We do a lot of redos from the $99 places. We don't lose many brake jobs.

 

 

we are in the same boat. average brake job is at least $200, often more. Most of the time we replace the rotors, most rotors installed on vehicles have reached their service limit and can not be machined. Every brake job gets the caliper brackets disassembled and cleaned, book rate for labor for most cars is at least 1.4 hrs for a complete brake job. Thats what we charge (book rate) so you're looking at $120 for labor alone. We stock Wagner ThermoQuiet pads, we also have been using a lot of Raybestos pads from Carquest. We use rotors from carquest as we've seen them to be pretty high quality for the price point. We also use Centric rotors. On European makes we use different brands for different makes, usually Zimmerman or Sebro rotors and a variety of high quality pads from the importer we use.

 

If price is an issue we will offer the economy Red pad setup from carquest. We have seen them to be high enough quality to be comfortable putting them on a car while being cheaper, they certainly don't last as long though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We charge .5 for a complete brake inspection. And most brake jopbs are 2.0 hours. We have an on the car lathe and pack bearings in those rare cases it has them. We use napa saftey stops and the friction material it came with not ceramic if not original. Also we do not use ceramic on larger trucks 3/4 ton or larger I have heard of lots of brake fading when hot or towing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joe, I can tell you working for Honda if we were turning rotors under warranty, Honda made us turn them on the car. The theory behind the on car lathe is a good one. It turns the rotors to match any runnout in the hub or wheel bearing. Makes the rotor much truer to the vehicle. Most people may not ever notice but it works the best. I wish I could afford one myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only diff ppl can notice is if there brakes are quiet and do not vibrate. I get quite a few shops who bring in brake jobs for us to do on brakes that are not easy to do. We are do for a new procut its 10 yrs old and going strong but I know we need one that can cut larger diameter rotors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I avoid the bargain basement parts stores because I can't trust what's in the box. I refuse to ever use anything from AAP regardless if it's the same brand as the part store across the street but AAP has it and the other store doesn't. Here's why I will NEVER buy anything from AAP.

 

1) When I first started out I fell into their "Lifetime Warranty" trap. Put an alternator on a Trailblazer. 28 days later it comes back on the hook for a dead battery. Charged the battery and it tested good. The alternator was junk. I called up and they were happy to send me another alternator. But all they were willing to pay me for labor, after a month of arguing with them was $12.50 (1/2 hour @ their approved $25.00/hour). And they refused to pay the tow bill.

 

2) Same year I had a gal's v-6 Mustang in for four wheel brakes. Pads, rotors and calipers. I used AAP because they were the only store in town with all the parts in stock. The next month she comes back with a horrible squeal. I spent an hour for the test drive, inspection and trying "Disc Brake Quiet" at the request of the store manager. Finally they relented and sent me a new set of brake pads and a new rotor (the noise was caused by a metallic chunk that wore a groove into the rotor, in less than 1000 miles). All I go out of that was $25.00. The following spring the gal brings it back to me because her pedal went to the floor and the next time she hit the pedal it was hard but the brakes were grinding. The inspection revealed that the Right inboard rear brake pad had delaminated and the backing plate was against the rotor. I called the store and was told, "Sorry no warranty. There must be something wrong in the brake system." The rest of the pads, all the way around were at a minimum of 80%. Just one had delaminated, on new calipers with brackets and new rotors. I asked the idiot what he proposed was wrong and all he could say was "No warranty. There has to be something wrong with the rest of the brake system." That was the last time I ever bought anything from AAP. By the way, I ate the cost of real quality brake pads to replace the APP trash so she would be happy.

 

As for your questions, I was never impressed with the wearever brake pads when I knew that was what was on the car. Noisy, poor feel and moderate performance. I use NAPA Adaptive One brake pads on my own stuff and love them. But they are prohibitively expensive in most cases. For my customers I try to use Wagner ThermoQuiet. In over 10 years of use I have had 3 noise complaints, and only one performance issue. Otherwise they perform well, have reasonable life, low dust, low noise and are reasonably priced. When I put brakes on a customer's vehicle I know that vehicle is on the road with my family. Your family may not be valuable enough to you to use top quality brake parts, but my family is too valuable to me to use cheap stuff on your car. Sure the garbage at the DIY stores probably performs well enough 80% of the time, but what about when that 4 year old rides his tricycle out in front of you unexpectedly and FEET matter. Do you want good enough, or do you want the best? The need for premium performance from your brakes may only come once in awhile, but when the difference between stopping in time with your heart pounding and a trip to the hospital is mere feet, I want the best. You can't always control how fast and hard you have to stop, so brakes and tires matter far more than people want to acknowledge. Because if they did, they couldn't by the cheapest thing available.

 

Your car wont' hurt anyone if it doesn't go, but it sure will if it won't WHOA!

 

rant over

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have tried several different brands. For a while I was using Bendix Globals. The pad itself is okay, the issue I had were the shims on the outside of the pad coming loose. They are only held on by some bent over tabs, and once the tabs are bent any which direction even the smallest bit, they squeal.

 

Right now i use the Duralast Gold from Autozone. They are a little more expensive, but the shims are held in place by rivets and cannot be removed. So far I have had 0 complaints from customers and I have installed them on dozens of cars.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

My shop is in western NY state. 99% of rotors cannot be turned due to rust and pitting issues so all brake jobs get 2 new rotors (Napa Premium) and Napa SS pads, normally ceramic with new hardware. I can't really tell the difference between the Adaptive One pads and the Safety Stops, both are quiet and outlast the rotors. We put Napa ultra premium rotors on if the customer agrees, but they rust out in a couple years too. I've tried them all and the SS's are working well for us. On some imports we use OE from the dealer or the reboxed OE's from Napa. Calipers get cleaned up like new and lubed. Brake job is $240-$350 per axle but they don't come back. We re-do many $89.99 brake jobs from the local low-bidders - my customers want good brakes. We were using Thermoquiets but they tend to fall apart after 6 months or so. The Napa TS cheap pads squeal like crazy we stopped using them entirely. They have a new formula now according to the newsletter, but for $11 I'm not sold.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We live in the hills. We guarantee our pads won't squeak. We use Akebono or centric ceramics if possible. We charge for a brake inspection which includes a test drive, pulling all 4 wheels, measuring inboard, outboard pads, rotors, checking the master cylinder and brake lines. I see our brake jobs are a lot more money than the average. We pay the tech .3 for brake inspection and 1.4 for the brake job. I see I have been paying more than most of you. Our brake jobs, not counting rotors usually from $200 to $250 plus a hydraulic brake flush. If you believe in your value, you can sell it. We do a lot of redos from the $99 places. We don't lose many brake jobs.

How are you liking the Akebono pads (or are you even still using them)? I've tried them on a few cars and had mixed results. One I didn't like was on a LS430. The shims came glued on...CROOKED! Pad design on a LS430 is the style where 2 pins pass through the backing plate to hold the pads in place, so glued on freaking shims that don't line are kind of a pain.

 

I'm considering trying Advics(from worldpac) on the next brake job that comes through. Supposedly those are OEM for the cars I work on (Toyota and Lexus). I'll probably call my worldpac rep tomorrow and asking if he has any feedback on them.

 

Anyway, thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Automotive Brake Pads

 

What is your preferred brand of automotive brake pads and why?

Who is the supplier of that brake pad to you?

What is the warranty on those pads?

Who manufactures those brake pads?

What grade are those brake pads, low end, mid, high end?

Are they ceramic, semi-metallic, organic, or blend?

We only use Akebono Ultra Premium brake pads. They are ceramic (No brake dust, and quiet). Our customers love them. Some track cars we use Hawk. We purchase them either through SSF or WorldPac.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I generally use whatever is OE. I have spoken to another shop friend who runs a general repair and he gets GREAT margins on some aftermarket brand pads with no complaints. I really wish I could go that route but I feel that my reputation wouldn't withstand a customer complaining about some aftermarket no name brand pad even if they quality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Believe it or not the Duralast Gold pads have really been a non issue for us. No comebacks due to noise or performance. Easy to source, priced decent, easy. Example, on my hd3500 duramax I use OE pads because I use OE everything on my cars, they are $160 a set. They stop good and last forever. The golds are $40, stop about the same. They wear out quicker but not 4x quicker. They fit pretty good. No doubt the OE parts are the best fit, but I can't send every customer with a tight budget away if they can't afford the best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Believe it or not the Duralast Gold pads have really been a non issue for us. No comebacks due to noise or performance. Easy to source, priced decent, easy. Example, on my hd3500 duramax I use OE pads because I use OE everything on my cars, they are $160 a set. They stop good and last forever. The golds are $40, stop about the same. They wear out quicker but not 4x quicker. They fit pretty good. No doubt the OE parts are the best fit, but I can't send every customer with a tight budget away if they can't afford the best.

 

Sometimes it may just be easier to give your customer options and let them decide after you explain the differences in them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Sometimes it may just be easier to give your customer options and let them decide after you explain the differences in them.

I'm of the opinion that customers should almost always be given a choice. We don't know their personal/financial situation, nor their mentality or purchasing habits.

I've said before on here that at the minimum I feel a "good/better" choice should be given, if not a "good/better/best" choice.

Let them make the decision, it makes them feel like they have some control over a bad situation.

 

If they are selling the car within a year, do they really want or need OE parts? Probably not, unless that is their selling feature.

Are they giving the car to their kids? Maybe they would want the best -and safest- parts for their kids' car.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do give customers a best/good/cheap choice on tires, brakes, suspension, pretty much any commodity service. I just don't advertise it. A customer that comes in for brakes gets a complete inspection and a quote for OE equivalent brakes. If they balk at it I offer the cheaper aftermarket choices, maybe I'll discount the whole job a little bit using the better parts or give away the brake flush or something. We never put garbage on cars, I can't afford the comebacks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...

We live in the hills. We guarantee our pads won't squeak. We use Akebono or centric ceramics if possible. We charge for a brake inspection which includes a test drive, pulling all 4 wheels, measuring inboard, outboard pads, rotors, checking the master cylinder and brake lines. I see our brake jobs are a lot more money than the average. We pay the tech .3 for brake inspection and 1.4 for the brake job. I see I have been paying more than most of you. Our brake jobs, not counting rotors usually from $200 to $250 plus a hydraulic brake flush. If you believe in your value, you can sell it. We do a lot of redos from the $99 places. We don't lose many brake jobs.

DITTO as You and I are close. Our brake job with centric ceramic pad kits with new hardware start at $295.00 per axle. Brake fluid flush was extra. Our brake jobs were proven to be quieter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

We've had excellent success with the combo of Centric rotors and Autozone pads- (multi through ceramic).  Only complaints from customers have been a slight rust ring on the rotors, and from my techs, Honda's are a pain to fit tophats made by Centric.  Still looking for a good, safe, cheap and reliable generic from OEM for those customers on a budget for the rear on Honda's- thoughts would be appreciated!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We opened 5 1/2 yrs ago and have been using Autozone gold pads with the cheaper rotors. We get a package deal. Car and some SUVs are $79.95. Tucks and some SUVs are $99.95. We almost always do pads and rotors together. We may have had a few comebacks for noise over these years. The gold brake pads are made by Bosch.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to use Wagner ThermoQuiets on everything they were available for with great success.  Long life, quiet strong performance and low dusting and decent price.  Then I started having problems with Chrysler minivans, mushy pedal, poor stopping, even after a long test drive/bedding process.  Then I started having problems with the TQs on random cars & trucks.  My supplier carried the Centric line and while I won't use their wheel bearings and other products I have been very happy with the Centric PosiQuiet (the "super premium") brake pads.  I'm a little leery with lower price but I guess time will tell.  I put them on my own car for personal experience with them.  I used to use NAPA AdaptiveOne pads on my own cars and LOVED them.  Then I started getting pulsation in the brakes after about a year.  Now I am absolutely fanatical about proper cleaning, lubricating and installation of calipers, brackets and pad abutments as well as rotor LRO so I know the problem is not with my work.  So no more NAPA AD pads either.  I have had good luck so far with the NAPA SS pads.  They used to squeal badly but apparently they changed the formulation and I haven't had a noise complaint in several years from the ones I used the SS pads on.  But they are often 1/2 again as expensive as the PosiQuiets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, PherBag said:

Forgot to mention. Car brake jobs per axle, $225. Truck brake jobs per axle, $250. I don’t really mark up the rotors. It just makes for a quicker brake job.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Just out of curiosity, why do you give your services away?  From your admitted prices you are only making about $140 gross on a brake job that costs you at least $80 for parts.  Are you using a really big hammer to beat the brake pads into the brackets instead of cleaning the rust?   Do you clean the hubs and measure lateral runout or do you just throw on new rotors and call it good?  I don't mean to be a rectal unit but a proper brake job, performed properly takes time and costs money.  In other words the right job done the right way isn't fast or cheap but it is a long term value over a poorly performed cheap brake job. 

 

What I can never understand is why we as a profession treat something as serious as brakes like a loss leader.  First we GIVE AWAY our time with free brake inspections and then we cut our throats with discounted (CHEAP) brake jobs.  The only way a shop that advertises these cheap brake jobs makes them work out is either the cheap brake job is one that endangers every car on the road because it uses the poorest quality (Cheap) parts, isn't performed to proper standards or it's a leader and nobody gets out of the shop for the "cheap brake job."  We had a shop like that in my town, $129.95 Lifetime pads.  It is rumored from those who sold him parts, knew him or his employees, NOBODY got out of there for $129.95.  Every car needed rotors and calipers if not more.  Soon the only people going to him were those chasing the cheap price, had no money and wouldn't, no, couldn't buy the dishonest brake job.  And then the rest of us ended up trying to justify our HONEST $300 brake jobs.   "But 'he' will do it for $130."  When in reality "he" was trying to charge them $400 for the same job except he was trying to sell stuff that it didn't really need.  He closed up shop one Friday night and Monday morning his employees didn't know what happened when they showed up and the place was cleaned out and locked up.  Why are we afraid to charge an honest price for honest work?  What other profession is there that does that?  Lawyers? Plumbers? Electricians? Doctors? Landscapers? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Techs get 1 hr per axle. They usually do it in maybe 40 min. They do a good job, otherwise they wouldn’t be here. We have a really good reputation to uphold.

I know it is a really good price. We don’t have a brake lathe, so I basically pass the price of the rotors onto the customer instead of making money on them. It would take a lot of brake jobs to pay for a lathe, plus replacing rotors makes it faster and able to get more jobs out in the long run. Just depends on how you look at it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

We use centric Pads and rotors an about eveything except European cars, they get oem or akebono. 

I charge Motor book time for the job. I quiz and educate the customer on rotor pulsation and put the decision in their hands. I let them know if the rotors puulsate after we will put them on with in two weeks for no labor, never have to so far in 6 years.  If they need rotors I replace them at book time and let my parts matrix price them out. I also let my parts matrix price the pads. I get menu pricing from local parts house. With book time and parts matrix i pay 29.95 and charge about $170 on average. With rotors and added labor it is about 330

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Alex unpinned this topic
  • 2 months later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         3 comments
      Got your attention? Good. The truth is, there is no such thing as the perfect technician pay plan. There are countless ways to create any pay plan. I’ve heard all the claims and opinions, and to be honest, it’s getting a little frustrating. Claims that an hourly paid pay plan cannot motivate. That flat rate is the only way to truly get the most production from your technicians. And then there’s the hybrid performance-based pay plan that many claim is the best.
      At a recent industry event, a shop owner from the Midwest boasted about his flat-rate techs and insisted that this pay plan should be adopted by all shops across the country. When I informed him that in states like New York, you cannot pay flat-rate, he was shocked. “Then how do you motivate your techs” he asked me.
      I remember the day in 1986 when I hired the best technician who ever worked for me in my 41 years as an automotive shop owner. We’ll call him Hal. When Hal reviewed my pay plan for him, and the incentive bonus document, he stared at it for a minute, looked up, and said, “Joe, this looks good, but here’s what I want.” He then wrote on top of the document the weekly salary he wanted. It was a BIG number. He went on to say, “Joe, I need to take home a certain amount of money. I have a home, a wife, two kids, and my Harly Davidson. I will work hard and produce for you. I don’t need an incentive bonus to do my work.” And he did, for the next 30 years, until the day he retired.
      Everyone is entitled to their opinion. So, here’s mine. Money is a motivator, but not the only motivator, and not the best motivator either. We have all heard this scenario, “She quit ABC Auto Center, to get a job at XYZ Auto Repair, and she’s making less money now at XYZ!” We all know that people don’t leave companies, they leave the people they work for or work with.
      With all this said, I do believe that an incentive-based pay plan can work. However, I also believe that a technician must be paid a very good base wage that is commensurate with their ability, experience, and certifications. I also believe that in addition to money, there needs to be a great benefits package. But the icing on the cake in any pay plan is the culture, mission, and vision of the company, which takes strong leadership. And let’s not forget that motivation also comes from praise, recognition, respect, and when technicians know that their work matters.
      Rather than looking for that elusive perfect pay plan, sit down with your technician. Find out what motivates them. What their goals are. Why do they get out of bed in the morning? When you tie their goals with your goals, you will have one powerful pay plan.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By carmcapriotto
      Live from MACS (Mobile Air Climate Systems) 2024 Training Event & Trade Show, Michael Ingvardsen discusses the evolution of thermal heat management, the importance of training, and the challenges of new refrigerants. Michael emphasizes the need for compatibility between components and refrigerants, and the role of distributors in ensuring product reliability. The episode highlights the complexity of modern air conditioning systems and the value of specialized knowledge in the field. Michael Ingvardsen, Global Technical Training Manager, Nissens Automotive Show Notes
      Importance of training and industry legacy (00:02:05) Michael discusses the significance of training, family legacy in the industry, and the need to understand the past for the future. Changes in automotive air conditioning (00:06:08) Michael explains how air conditioning technology has changed, emphasizing the impact on vehicle components and functionality. Heat pumps in electric and hybrid vehicles (00:10:15) Michael explains the role of heat pumps in electric and hybrid vehicles. Refrigerant and technology standards (00:13:34) Discussion on the impact of refrigerant standards, environmental considerations, and the need for understanding chemical and refrigerant properties. Future refrigerant technology (00:17:33) Insights into future refrigerant technology, including the challenges and considerations for electric vehicles and heat pump systems. The challenge of introducing new refrigerants (00:18:29) Discussion on the challenges of introducing replacement refrigerants. Importance of air conditioning training (00:22:51) Emphasis on the value of staying updated with air conditioning training and the upcoming training classes on heat pumps. Challenges in implementing new practices (00:32:47) Discussion on the challenges in getting technicians to adopt new practices and the need for proper training and information dissemination. The impact of improper maintenance on warranties (00:30:58) The implications of improper maintenance on heat pump systems and the financial consequences for shops. The need for compliance and best practices (00:34:36) Emphasis on the importance of following proper procedures and best practices in air conditioning maintenance to avoid potential breakdowns and higher costs.
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care Learn more about NAPA Auto Care and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting https://www.napaonline.com/en/auto-care Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections    
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Our first auto repair shop was named “Behind the Star.” That may make you want to stop listening right now as we clearly had no idea what we were doing. But if we learn from our mistakes, we have a more comprehensive education than most! Through the years as we’ve worked with many different clients, we’ve seen just about every problem a business could have with a name. In this episode, we share some things you’ll want to think about when naming an auto repair shop.
      Thank you to RepairPal for sponsoring The Auto Repair Marketing Podcast. Learn more about RepairPal at https://repairpal.com/shops
      How To Get In Touch
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected] 
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      There is no getting around the importance of training and mentorship in the automotive service repair industry. A strong commitment to training provides many long-term benefits for business growth. A collaborative approach to learning is encouraged, creating in-house experts and fostering a culture of continuous improvement. Brandon advocates for staying technologically updated and customer-focused to ensure business success. The episode underscores training's vital role in enhancing customer service and business success. Brandon Steckler, instructor for CarQuest Institute and WorldPAC Training Institute, Technical Editor for MotorAge Magazine. Brandon’s previous episodes HERE. Show Notes
      The Importance of Mentorship (00:01:45) Brandon's mentor, Jim Morton, and the impact of mentorship on his career. Passing on Knowledge (00:02:53) Brandon's commitment to guiding and mentoring younger technicians. Learning from Mistakes (00:03:27) The value of sharing personal mistakes and lessons in training sessions. Influence and Impact (00:04:56) The significance of influencing and changing lives as a trainer in the automotive industry. Motivation for Technicians (00:05:24) The evolving motivations for technicians and the importance of ongoing education. The Role of Training (00:06:15) The critical role of ongoing education and networking for technicians. Engaging Training (00:07:03) Brandon's approach to engaging and building trust with trainees. Staying Current (00:11:07) The importance of continuous learning and the 85% rule Teaching in Europe (00:16:30) Brandon's experience teaching in the UK and Ireland, and plans for future classes. Importance of Mentorship (00:18:27) Brandon discusses the value of sharing mistakes and not being a hero in teaching, emphasizing mentorship. Encouraging Questions (00:20:11) The positive impact of asking questions and fostering a network of knowledge in training sessions. Creating Technical Content (00:22:51) Brandon's process for creating technical videos and the importance of creating useful content for technicians. Value of Training (00:26:48) Brandon's approach to building confidence in technicians through training and the impact of a positive learning environment. Understanding Shop Ownership (00:29:08) Brandon's realization of the responsibilities and challenges of shop ownership and the importance of a well-rounded skill set. Managing Training Responsibilities (00:29:57) Discussion on the responsibility of shop owners to invest in structured training programs and the benefits of investing in employees. Challenges of Time and Money (00:31:40) The difficulty of allocating time and money for training, and the importance of seeing the return on investment in training. The Importance of Solutions (00:33:28) Emphasizing the need to focus on finding solutions rather than dwelling on problems, and the positive outcomes that result from this mindset.
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care Learn more about NAPA Auto Care and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting https://www.napaonline.com/en/auto-care Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our partners, NAPA TRACS and Promotive
      Did you know that NAPA TRACS has onsite training plus six days a week support?
      It all starts when a local representative meets with you to learn about your business and how you run it.  After all, it's your shop, so it's your choice.
      Let us prove to you that Tracs is the single best shop management system in the business.  Find NAPA TRACS on the Web at NAPATRACS.com
      It’s time to hire a superstar for your business; what a grind you have in front of you. Great news, you don’t have to go it alone. Introducing Promotive, a full-service staffing solution for your shop. Promotive has over 40 years of recruiting and automotive experience. If you need qualified technicians and service advisors and want to offload the heavy lifting, visit www.gopromotive.com.
      Paar Melis and Associates – Accountants Specializing in Automotive Repair
      Visit us Online: www.paarmelis.com
      Email Hunt: [email protected]
      Get a copy of my Book: Download Here
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Similar Tagged Content

  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...