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Joe Marconi

Management
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Everything posted by Joe Marconi

  1. I had the same thing happen to me. I had my web/IT company figured it out. It took a few days. GMB is important, get it straighten out. Sorry to hear this. But it does happen. GOOD LUCK!
  2. I don't think shops should consider other shops in their market area when setting prices. In addition, while overheard costs may differ from shop to shop, that should not be the only thing that is considered when setting labor and part margins. Yes, a shop with a low overhead is different from a shop that has just invested in new equipment and added 3 bays. However, a job is worth what a job is worth. And that may mean that the shop with the lower overhead has an advantage and will make more money as compared to a shop with a higher overhead. But just because a shop has low overhead,
  3. In the 4 decades as a shop owner, my number one way to have a smooth running shop is to surround yourself with the right people. I am interested in hearing from other shop owners. What's your opinion on how to run a smooth running operation?
  4. Thanks Frank, sorry I took so long to reply. I really appreciate it. Hope all is well in the land of sun and heat!
  5. Here's a tip I preach at the Elite Fly with the Eagles Marketing course: Study your competition in your local area, know everything about, learn what they do in your community, learn about their advertising strategy and marketing strategy, find what their strengths are, and find out what they do special for their customers. Ok...once that is done, here is what you do: Ready? Don't do anything that your competition does! That's right, in order to stand out, be different. Don't mimic what your completion does. Tell YOUR story and build a marketing and advertising strategy based
  6. Got your attention? Please read on... In case you were hibernating the last year and half, you had to notice all the increases around you. From food, gas, utilities, taxes, insurance, etc., etc., etc. Not to mention all the training and tool investment we must make from now on, to remain in the business. I have been preaching this for decades: As an industry we don't charge enough, especially when it comes to labor. While there are ways to increase labor dollars, for example: becoming more productive, making sure that we charge for complex testing and driveability; Base labor r
  7. The biggest issue with our industry is the inconsistency with pricing and labor charges. And not just around the country; even in local areas. After 41 years as a shop owner I will stand by my conviction that we have not charged enough and we have ALL suffered because of it. I do see changes on the horizon, but not enough shops are willing to charge what they are worth. I met an A rated Diesel Tech through a friend of mine, working on trucks in New York. His rate of pay: $45.00 per hour. GOOD FOR HIM! By the way: Shop's Labor rate: $199.99 per hour.
  8. There are so many sides to this, and you make great points. I think that in time, when we all learn the truth, we will be surprised and hopefully move in a better direction.
  9. 100% agree. I am very active on Google My Business. The best reason to utilize GMB? It's Google! Does anyone need another reason?
  10. After a slow January and multiple snow storms in Feb, 2021 is beginning to shape up and gaining traction. Being less than an hour north of NYC has its challenges, but all the pent up demand is greatly improving business. The roads are packed, so people are driving. My prediction? A very good rest of 2021!
  11. Thanks Bob! I really appreciate the feedback. And, I may be calling you too.
  12. I saw a quick demo on Openbay's Otis, an interactive chat program that works with your website. Does anyone use this feature, or know about it? Here is a link: https://solutions.openbay.com/
  13. Don't make the mistake that so many business owners make; thinking that once they hire someone, their job is over. In reality, your job BEGINS when you hire someone. Make sure that all your new hires and current employees are taken care of. Get them the training they need, help to map out their future, mentor them, coach them, let them know how much you appreciate them. Have meetings and reviews. We talk so much these days about recruiting people and that it's hard to find people. What about doing all you can to make sure your existing employees don't leave?
  14. That is a great saying Frank! Thanks for the feedback!
  15. The common buzz in business is to market to new, potential customers. This is a smart strategy given that every business losses customers each year, and we need to replace those lost customers. However, we also need a marketing plan that takes care of our existing customers. It is cheaper and easier to retain your customers, than to market for new ones. What strategies do you employ to retain your existing customers?
  16. Last October the doctors found a large infection and abscess in my large intestine that perforated into my abdomen. I required emergency surgery to remove the abscess; removing about six inches of my large intestine. That was step one: This past January, I needed an additional surgery to remove another 4 inches, and repair other areas of my intestines. Thankfully, I am fine, with no lasting issues. It will take about a year to fully recover, but all is well. I am telling you this for one reason: What if something were to happen to you? Will your shop survive? What about your family?
  17. I think the biggest reason why Yelp, Repair Pal and other similar companies don't work for the majority of the shops is that they don't find the profile customer for the shop. Think about, would YOUR customer contact Yelp or Repair Pal if they needed a repair? Maybe if they were on the road, far from home, and the Googled auto repair. Most shops have a clearly defined profile customer. Repair Pal and Yelp send us those that are not loyal to anyone. For the most part, our customer perform their due diligence and we then cultivate the relationship. Just me thoughts...Yours?
  18. I too tried Repair Pal, got ALL the wrong customers and mechanical breakdowns. The vehicles towed in were badly maintained vehicles; again not my customer.
  19. When I look back at my 40-years as a shop owner, there is one thing that stands out among everything else: It’s the people we surround ourselves with that will have the biggest influence in determining our success. Think about it, even the greatest NFL coach will never win a Super Bowl without great players. I have worked with a lot of employees through the years, including technicians at all skill levels, bookkeepers, service advisors, managers, and support staff. I can tell you with 100 percent conviction that the years that were the most successful were the ones that I had assembled t
  20. When I look back at my 40-years as a shop owner, there is one thing that stands out among everything else: It’s the people we surround ourselves with that will have the biggest influence in determining our success. Think about it, even the greatest NFL coach will never win a Super Bowl without great players. I have worked with a lot of employees through the years, including technicians at all skill levels, bookkeepers, service advisors, managers, and support staff. I can tell you with 100 percent conviction that the years that were the most successful were the ones that I had assembled t
  21. January 2020 started without a hitch. We hit our sales and profit goals in textbook fashion. However, by the end of February, it was obvious that something wasn’t right. Sales for the month dipped by more than 30 percent. It was devastating. What we didn’t realize was that this was just the beginning of even greater losses. By the time Governor Cuomo of New York issued the stay-at-home order on March 22, sales had dropped 75 percent. With most of the country in lock-down, I didn’t know what to fear more—the coronavirus or the impending financial disaster the world was about to endure. B
  22. January 2020 started without a hitch. We hit our sales and profit goals in textbook fashion. However, by the end of February, it was obvious that something wasn’t right. Sales for the month dipped by more than 30 percent. It was devastating. What we didn’t realize was that this was just the beginning of even greater losses. By the time Governor Cuomo of New York issued the stay-at-home order on March 22, sales had dropped 75 percent. With most of the country in lock-down, I didn’t know what to fear more—the coronavirus or the impending financial disaster the world was about to endure. B


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