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Greetings everyone!

 

I just wanted to say hello and introduce myself.

 

While my back ground is primarily in the aviation field (i'm a retired aircraft mechanic), my goal is to gear up my own shop strictly in the field of brakes and suspension. I do have many years working on vehicles part time and I have also restored 2 trucks. So I'm hoping that I can gain a bunch of knowledge here about running a shop, customer service and some of the do's and don'ts along the way. I presently have a small following of customers, but I would like to grow in the near future to a customer base that would provide a good supplemental income.

 

Again....hello and thanks for having me!

 

R/

Gary

 

 

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      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 3 replies
      • 289 views
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      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 1 reply
      • 244 views
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