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phynny

Pricing markup matrix advice

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We use Mitchell and I find myself constantly changing the prices that it spits out even though I set up the pricing matrix... Anyone willing to share how they split it up and what figures they use? I want to give a fair price but I also don't want to short myself,

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Edited by ScottSpec

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Edited by Dino1

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