Quantcast
Jump to content


    • You can post now and register later. Already registered? sign in now to post with your account.
    • ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

        Only 75 emoji are allowed.

      ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

      ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

      ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


      Once you submit your question, a new topic will be created for you in our forums. Our moderators may move your topic to a more suitable forum category if one exists. Members will see your topic and be able to respond to your question.

    • This will not be shown to other users.

Recommended Posts

A woman called her dentist the other day and asked how much would a root canal cost. Her dentist replied, “Sure, hold on, let me look that up. Ok, that’ll be around $1400 for that job. Would you like to come in and have that root canal done?” Ridiculous scenario, you’re thinking? I agree! A dentist would never give a price over the phone without first examining the patient.

 

Why do some shops continue to give prices over the phone? Even something as simple as a wheel alignment price can lead the customer and you in the wrong direction. Do you really know the car needs an alignment?

 

Pricing over the phone is the same as giving them a diagnosis. When a customer calls for a price on a water pump and you give a price, you are saying to them, “Yes, it IS the water pump and here’s the price. And then you get the car in the bay and it needs hoses, a thermostat, and the radiator is leaking, not the pump.

 

Giving prices over the phone also tells the caller to please judge you on price alone; a road I refuse to go down.

 

I know this is going to push a lot of buttons today, but my tip today is to resist giving prices over the phone. Get the car into you bay, perform the inspection and/or the proper testing and then when you know what the problem is, sell the job.

 

We are professionals, no different than the Dentist.

 

Your thoughts?

 

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 

Edited by phynny
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 

Edited by 3PuttFever

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Topics

    • By tco
      Accepting Credit Cards at 0% cost 
      Credit card fees for merchants have drastically gone up in recent years, especially for reward card purchases, making credit card fees one of businesses largest expenses.  Interchange fees for reward cards have gone up by 24% in a recent 4-year period. The highest reward card fees to a merchant are now around 3% of the transaction total (not including what the markup from whomever sold you their credit card processing).  Many people have probably seen Samuel L. Jackson TV commercials promoting Capital One’s Quick Silver credit card, paraquoting, “The Quick Silver credit card will give you 1.5% cash back on all of your purchases.” Who do you think is actually giving these customers 1.5% of their cash back on their credit card purchases?  You guessed it- you, the merchant.
      What’s a business owner to do?
      Do nothing Raise the products or services prices to account for higher credit card fees Offer a cash discount Don’t accept credit cards Or, provide your customer a choice when they pay with a card to pay a surcharge or not- 0% credit card costs to the merchant All of these options have their pluses and minuses, but with the ever higher and higher fees credit cards are charging to merchants, there are other methods where technology and consumer choice can help mitigate these fees.
      0% credit card cost is relatively new legal method of accepting card payments in the US.  The credit card companies fought to not allow consumers a choice to pay a surcharge with credit card or zero fees with a debit card.  The credit card companies make much less money with a debit card opposed to a credit card... This case went all the way to the US Supreme Court this decade.  The credit card companies lost and consumers being able to choose to pay a surcharge with a credit card or zero fees with a debit card is now legal in 45 states.  The remainder of the 5 states will likely be joining the other 45 states in the near future as there are still ongoing court proceedings.
      The US is now following the Australian model which has been allowing merchants to surcharge since 2003.  Currently, 42% of all merchants in Australia pass on a surcharge to customers who use a credit card.
      Here’s an option that you might not know about, until now:
      When your consumer decides to pay with a card, they have two options.  If they use a credit card, a small fee will be charged to their card. If they use a debit card, there will be no fee to the consumer.  Our software does all the work and explains to the customer of their choice prior to the charge being authorized.
      What exactly are the costs to the merchant and to the consumer?
      For credit cards: Merchant pays zero credit card fees, the consumer pays 3.5% of the transaction amount
      For debit cards:  Merchant pays 1% + $0.25/authorization, the consumer pays Zero fees
      Facts:
      A card swiper is not needed: credit card information can be typed in a phone, computer over the phone and in-person.  A 'brick' card swiper/dipper is available if needed.
      Works with online sales/invoices
      Simple application process, no upfront cost, no term contract, no cancellation fee and complies with all credit card rules and regulations
      If you auto batch by 8:00 PM EST, you get your money the next day
      Up-and-running within a week
       Benefits to the Merchant:
      Being fair to your consumer by offering them a choice to pay a fee or not, while eliminating your credit card fees, which can be up to 3% of your total credit card sales.
      Simple to use and all charges are viewable through real-time online portal.  
      Support: our team is there when you need us, but it truly is very straight forward.
      We realize this solution is not for everyone.  But, you now have the opportunity to no longer pay credit card fees, forever.  Reach out through ASO or here if you are interested in discussing further: https://www.lomasolutions.com/contact

      View full article
    • By tco
      Loma Solutions represents a 0% credit card fee solution.   We have 1000's of customers in the US and our solution makes auto shop owners thousands of extra dollars every year.

      How does 0% processing work?
      When your customer decides to pay with a card, they have 2 options.  If they use a credit card, a small percentage of the transaction will be charged to their card.  If they use a debit card, there will be no fee to the customer.  Our software does all the work and explains to the customer of their choice prior to the card being authorized.

      What exactly are the costs to the merchant and to the customer?
      For credit cards: Merchant pays zero credit card fees, the customer pays 3.5% of the transaction
      For debit cards:  Merchant pays 1% + $0.25/authorization, the customer pays 0 fees

      Facts:
      - A card swiper is not needed: credit card information can be typed in a phone, computer or over the phone.  There is a 'brick' card swiper if needed*
      - No set-up costs or any other fees
      - Our agreement is month-to-month
      - If you auto batch by 8:00 PM EST, you get your money the next day
      - The solution complies with all card rules and regulations
      - We'll have you up-and-running within a week

      Benefits to the Merchant:
      *** You are being fair to your customer by offering them a choice to pay a fee or not, while you are eliminating your credit card fees, which can be up to 2.5% of your total card sales.
      - Simple to use and all charges are viewable through our real-time online portal.  
      - Support: our team is there when you need us.  We will show you and anyone on your team how to use the solution, but it’s very straight forward.
       
      Making you more money!
      If your current credit card fees are 2.5% of your total card sales, for every $50,000 in credit card transactions, you'll put an extra $1,250 in your pocket.
      * we will provide you with a ‘brick’ terminal: $35/month if needed.  This includes free paper re-supplies.
        Reach out if you'd like to discuss.
    • By Joe Marconi
      The cost of doing business in NY is high. It seems as if the expenses are going up faster than our sales income. How do we keep pace with cost of living and still remain competitive? It's hard to decrease fixed expenses.
    • By Gonzo
      Doctor's Orders   The field of automotive repair and body work has always  been plagued with a few unscrupulous individuals.  But, I  would say that every trade has their share of them as well.   I pride myself on doing the best that can be done for my  customers and I don't take kindly to anyone who thinks  this job is anything but a professional.  This is not a job  that can be mastered overnight; it takes years of experience  and understanding.     Even though I carry the title “ASE Master Technician” I  don't consider myself a “Master” of the automotive field.   I may have “mastered” the trade but not the technology that  continually changes.  That's an ongoing education which each  and every mechanic deals with.  But, with that said, there are  still some individuals that still look down upon the automotive  trade as some sort of second class job. Recently I received an  email from one of those type of individuals.     Several years ago I wrote an article titled, “Diagnostics Fee or Diagnostics Free” which was published in a variety of magazines.  The article was primarily about the issues of a diagnostic fee for testing and evaluating a vehicle.  A copy of one of the magazines was in a waiting room at a repair shop where this guy was getting his car to be repaired. He happens to be a dentist, which I consider as much a professional field as mine.  However, this guy... doesn't see it that way.  His email went something like this:    I read through your 'two cents' on engine diagnostics and I could not agree more.  However, I do have a bone to pick.  Charging for a diagnostic is fine but where do you draw the line?   I am a general dentist.  For a new patient I charge $39 for an exam (cleanings from a hygienist are $60).  I take roughly 25 minutes to complete an exam on a patient.  Some patients take longer as they have a more difficult case and sometimes they just have more questions.     I have spent 9 years in college, at a cost of over 200k, and roughly 600K on my practice (I have lots of fancy equipment too, even more expensive than the 'diagnostic computer') AND I am dealing with the actual health and well-being of mankind (screenings for head neck cancer, dental caries, oral path., etc., etc.)  If I used your kind of math I guess I should charge more in the neighborhood of $500 for an exam (my education alone was probably more than 20 times yours so the math is still WAY low).     But I don't charge that much.  A true professional would realize when a charge is ridiculous and when it is not.  A diagnostic charge from a mechanic should be in the neighborhood of $20. If you are charging in the near $100 range I would consider removing the self-titled "professional" from your website. Which I found funny that you brought it up anyway.   Your computer is a one-time purchase. You don't throw it away when you are done so quit trying to factor in the computer cost like it is a consumable.  A mechanic's pay at best is $35 an hour.  A $20 diagnostic over 5 minutes is more than enough for that and even overhead.     Actually, you just gave me an idea.  I am going to tell my patients I now have a "parts, labor, and supplies" fee.  That would be great.  Imagine the next time you come into my office and I say that my labor fee is over $500 an hour.  My patients would leave.  I can't believe a mechanic thinks charging $100 an hour or labor is reasonable when everything else is also marked up 300% PLUS!!!! ... It is laughable.     Anyway, I agree....but let’s get realistic.     This is a junk email and address, no need in trying to contact me with your response.      He agrees?  Realistically, I find that hard to believe.  These are the typical misguided perceptions that still linger in some peoples conceptions of the auto mechanic.  Apparently, according to this guy... I'm not worthy of calling myself a professional because I'm “just” a mechanic.   It's sad to say that there are still people out there that take this dim view of the automotive mechanic world.  It could be this guy is only retaliating from a previous experience with his car that didn't go right, or it could be he was at one of those “unprofessional” shops that tried to tackle a job they shouldn't have been taking on.  Maybe he thinks all mechanics alike, and not one of us is a true professional in our trade.     Obviously, after reading this, I have come to realize that all dentists are not alike.  I know my personal dentist respects my profession... and has a great amount of appreciation for my trade, just as much as I do for his skills and abilities.   Even though in the email he stated there was no need in a response, well, there is a way to respond.  Here it is.     Those years you spent in college almost equals my years of training... your investment into your field is acknowledged and is definitely a part of both our trades.  Mind you, the countless changes and improvements in the equipment and procedures in the auto industry (and dentistry as well) doesn't offset the cost of doing business in any shape or form.  You'd think it would, but, as fast as the auto manufacturers introduce new systems so does the equipment to diagnostic them change.   Honestly, I feel sorry for this guy.  He seems kind of bitter.  As a mechanic, I work on everything from the front bumper to the rear-end of the car.  This guy... using a car as the comparison... only works on the shiny grill that everyone first sees.   I mean really... he only has two models to work on and the last time I looked both models have the same 32 components to deal with. But, let's not reduce ourselves to his level of explaining the differences between the two professions. Oh wait… I already did.  My bad… I guess it’s a lot easier to be condescending than it is to pull teeth, huh, Doc.?   Sorry Mr. Dentist, I don't think I'll be following “Doctor's Orders” as you clearly state them in your email. I think this time you should take my advice and try to be more respectful to the guys and gals that keep your cherished ride on the road. There's no set fee for diagnostics, there's no 300% mark-up on parts, and there definitely isn't any magic one time purchased machine that will diagnose a car.   Maybe you should try to be a little more understanding and a bit more professional, because right now... you're not!    
      View full article
    • By Alex
      There are many different website services, packages, and programs available when choosing the right company/webmaster for your auto repair business. You can sign up to a service that provides a robust website, SEO (Search Engine Optimization), analytics, marketing services, social network management, integrations, etc. You can also sign up for much simpler solutions which usually only include a website and some SEO. You can also try to use an online website builder to get yourself online with something very basic, which is better than nothing. So many different option and they all have their associated costs. In some cases there are initial startup costs as well. In most cases however, there are monthly costs associated with operating a business website.
      Please take a moment and share, if you would like, about your website costs and associated services. Please also take a moment to answer a few quick question in the attached poll. Thank you.
       


  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By Joe Marconi
      A few years back, my service advisor, Tony, was trying to sell a customer a new battery. Let’s call this customer Ed Jones. Here’s how the conversation unfolded; “Mr. Jones, my technician completed our 21-point inspection on your vehicle and everything checks out fine. However, I do want to discuss the battery. Your battery was tested with our Midtronics digital battery diagnostic tool, which is a very accurate piece of equipment. Your battery is rated at 575 cold cranking amps, and your battery tested at 300.  Would you like me to replace the battery today?” Ed Jones looked at Tony, and three seconds later said, “Thank you for the information. Let me think about it.”
      I know Ed very well. The car we were servicing that day was his daughter’s car, who was home from college for the Christmas holiday. Ed’s daughter is in her first year at Plattsburgh University in upstate New York, which is about a five hour drive and near the Canadian border.  
      I could see the frustration on Tony’s face, so I gave him a little advice; “Tony, ask Mr. Jones who drives the car. After he answers you, ask him what the car is used for. Listen to his answers and then use that information to sell safety and peace of mind, not a battery.”
      Five minutes later, Tony reported back to me excited and amazed; “Joe, great advice!  He authorized the battery! I guess you knew he would buy the battery with the right questions?” I replied, “You were trying to sell Ed Jones a battery by pointing out the technical process we use to determine the health of the battery. What you need to do is reach the customer on an emotional level. The questions I recommended you ask made him realize that it’s the welfare of his daughter he was really buying, not a battery.” 
      Now, let’s clarify something. Tony didn’t say anything wrong with his sales presentation. But he got the process backwards. He was leading with logic. If you’re trying to sell something by using logic alone, you are going to struggle. People make buying decisions based on emotions. To make a sale, you need to connect with the part of the brain where emotions reside, and then back it up with logic.   
      Bombarding the customer first with facts and features tends to confuse the brain as it tries to make sense out what you are saying. That can be difficult because the technical information is usually not fully understood by the customer and the confusion usually results in the customer saying, “No.”  
      Let’s review the conversation when Tony asked the right questions; “Mr. Jones, who drives this car?” Ed replied, “My Daughter.” Tony continued, “And what does she use the car for?”  Ed replied, “She uses it to go college at Plattsburgh. She’s home for the holidays and goes back to school on Monday.” At that point, Tony realized why I urged him to ask those questions, and continued with, “So, your daughter drives this car back to college, and leaves on Monday. She goes to Plattsburgh, which is near the Canadian border.  Mr. Jones, it’s wintertime and that’s a long, lonely drive. Her battery tested weak and may fail without warning. For peace of mind and your daughter’s safety, wouldn’t it be in her best interest to replace the battery before she leaves?” Ed now makes the emotional decision, “Yes.” 
      Here’s the bottom line. First, know your customer. Build rapport during the write up process and find out all the details of why the car was brought in for service. Second, tone down the technical side of what you do. That’s not to say it’s not important. But, before you give the technical facts, reach your client on an emotional level. Ask questions to find out as much as you can about the customer, and then direct the conversation to the reasons why what you are trying to sell will benefit the well-being of the customer and/or the customer’s family.  
      Remember, decisions are easier to make when it has meaning to them or a family member. In Ed’s case, not replacing the battery would have been unsettling to him. Tony’s recommendation to replace the battery is perceived as the right decision because it promotes the safety and well-being of his daughter.
      Humans are driven by feelings and make emotional decisions, then justify it with logic. Next time you are trying to sell anything to a customer, ask yourself, “Why should the customer buy what I am trying to sell?” The answer may surprise you. 
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on November 1st, 2019


      View full article
    • By Joe Marconi
      We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 
    • By Joe Marconi
      We all have those customers that focus on price alone. And we all struggle with our persistent attempts at converting them into believers. Believers of the concept that, while we cannot totally dismiss price, it’s the value of the product or service the customer needs to consider when making a purchase. What’s funny about these customers is that each visit tends to start with a complaint about price, even before the car is looked at. We recently had a situation that started off on the wrong foot, with price being the issue; but ended up a win for us, and for the customer.
      Charlie Challenge (not his real name) arrived at our shop and asked for an estimate on replacing the timing chain for his Nissan Altima. My service advisor responded with, “Mr. Challenge, that’s a big job.  How do you know your car needs a timing chain?” Charlie replied back, “Another shop checked it out and they told me it does. Can you please give me a price?” My advisor continued with, “Well, before we do anything, we need to perform a few tests to make sure you really do need a timing chain.” Charlie emphatically replied back, “And how much is that going to cost? All you guys want is my money! I asked for one thing; a price on a timing chain and you just want to make more money on something I already know I need!” 
      It took a lot of composure, but my advisor calmly stated all the reasons why testing is the best way to go, emphasizing the fact that if we replace the chain and it’s not the problem, the money spent would be wasted. Charlie shook his head, threw the keys on the counter and authorized the testing. 
      I’ve known Charlie for a long time. He’s not a bad guy. But price is always the topic of discussion. He has told me in the past that I should take a look at what other shops charge, and be more competitive with my prices. I have told Charlie that I don’t, and never will, price my services by what other shops are charging. I have also told him to look beyond price and look at the value you get. Besides, all the quality shops that I know are pretty much the same when it comes to pricing.  
      During the write-up process, Charlie revealed to my service advisor that the check engine light had been on, and that’s why he took his car to the other shop. The other shop replaced a valve timing solenoid, but that didn’t fix the problem. He was then told that the next step was to replace the chain. 
      Later that morning, the car was dispatched to a technician. A multipoint inspection was performed, along with all the tests related to the check engine light; which was a timing error.  After the MPI and the tests were completed, we found a few things wrong with Charlie’s car. His Altima needed an oil change service, a battery, rear brakes, an air filter, the cabin filter had a mouse nest in it and the car needed an intake timing control sensor, not a timing chain. This engine has two intake control solenoids. One was supposedly replaced by the other shop. So, did this car have two bad sensors? Or was the wrong sensor replaced by mistake? 
      When my service advisor called Charlie to tell him the good news, he was silent for a moment.  He was shocked that the car didn’t need a timing chain. He authorized the solenoid replacement, the oil change and replacing the mouse-infested cabin filter. He declined the other work.  
      I purposely did the follow-up call with Charlie a few days later.  He was happy to hear from me and told me that car hadn’t run this good in years. I had to needle him a bit, “So Charlie, are we really expensive? We saved you a ton of money by doing the tests first and not just replacing the chain.” He said, “Ok Joe, I get it, I really do this time.” 
      During our conversation, Charlie did confess that he didn’t go to another shop, but actually went to that all-knowing, all-powerful place on the internet known as Google. It was Charlie that replaced the solenoid, not realizing there were two, and not knowing how to properly test the system either.  
      When I asked Charlie why he didn’t let us replace the battery, air filter and the rear brakes, he replied, “Joe, come on, I can do that work myself, and besides, you guys are expensive.”
      Sometimes you win the battle, but it’s hard to win the war with some customers. 
       
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on October 1st, 2019


      View full article
    • By Joe Marconi
      We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 
    • By Joe Marconi
      If there is one thing that doctors and dentists do very well, it's that they book the next appointment for their clientele. I have heard every excuse possible why many auto repair shops don’t do this.  But the fact remains that everyone in your shop today will need future service and repairs. And the question is, “Are they coming back to you.”

      Another reason for booking the next appointment is that there are times when not all the recommended services were done today. Some were postponed due to budget and prioritizing what’s most important.  So, before that customer leaves, make sure the customer commits to a future date to have the work done. After all, why did you recommend it in the first place?

      Car delivery is the time to review all the work done today, continue to build the relationship and to inform your customers of upcoming work and services. But don’t leave it to chance that the customer will remember. Be proactive, discuss future dates and put those dates in your calendar.  

      Lastly, call customers a few days before the appointment as a reminder. If the appointment has to be moved, then move it.

  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...