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Hey everyone,

 

I will be honest and upfront, I am not a auto-shop owner. I do work in the industry however, as I represent a lubricant manufacturing/distributing company located in Ontario.

 

I have a question, and I would greatly appreciate some feedback.

 

I know that the second I walk into most shops, as the salesman for my company, I am not met with much adoration or appreciation. I understand this. I know that you are extremely busy, and I am interrupting your day. I DO however come with options that can potentially allow you to earn more money. Which is how I look at it, as opposed to simply trying to make sales and pad my wallet (which is not the case.)

 

What I am hoping to achieve here is some insight on how to get through to my target demographic in a more effective manner. If I can provide a product that allows you to increase your margins, I would imagine that you would be excited about this prospect. This is not, however, how I am usually received.

 

Which is more important to you? Brand? Service? Or does it simply boil down to cost?

 

I apologize if this is perhaps not the best avenue to be seeking information from, but I thought getting a response directly from the source might be the best way to get direct responses.

 

Thank you very much everyone, and all the best.

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