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Wanted to know how shops are handling all the different types, weights, and specs on the current oils?

 

The problem I have is that we follow what the manufacture recommends (pain sometimes) but I feel it is the right thing to do. This becomes and issue when for the first few services the customer was bringing to the Dealer, so they can get the proper care. Come to find out they were using whatever was the cheapest. I have had a 2012 Acura and a 2013 Subaru which both call for very specific oil, which both cars were getting straight up conventional oil. The problem becomes now trying to explain on the third or fourth service why it’s so expensive compared to what the dealer was charging. (They should know what the car takes) I have called a few in our area, and have been told we use whatever we have in bulk! WHATS THE DEAL WITH THAT

Wanted to know how shops are handling all the different types, weights, and specs on the current oils?

 

 

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