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Joe Marconi

Positive indicators for Independent Auto Repair Shops

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There are a lot of positive indicators for the future of the independent automotive repair shops. (See below). As shop owners, we need to be proud of the fact that we are still the number one choice of the motoring public. But positive indicators are not enough. Plan now for your future. Be proactive when it comes to your business. Understand your numbers and determine what you need to be profitable. Take care of your employees. Continue to provide the necessary training and above all, provide the absolute best possible customer service.

 

From the Auto Care Associations 24th edition of the Auto Care Aftermarket Factbook:

*In 2014, more than 840,000 technicians were employed - a 3.4% increase over the previous year.

*The light vehicle scrappage rate in 2015 was 4.4%, the lowest level in 13 years.

*In 2014, the number of general repair shops actually increased slightly over the previous year.

*The number of licensed drivers in the United States continues to climb steadily and sat at just over 212 million at the end of 2013

*Vehicle maintenance costs are second only to gasoline when it comes to total vehicle operating costs.

*The independent aftermarket share of the total market has been 70% for the last four years and is expected to remain steady through 2018.

 

Source: Motor Magazine, John Lypen Editors Report, February 2016. To read the complete article, click the link below:

https://www.motor.com/magazine-summary/editors-report-feb-2016/

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