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Found 10 results

  1. I need to find some employees fast and I am having no luck, anyone willing to help me write an advertisement or help me with postings, over the phone or through e-mail, please let me know. Just found this, not feeling good about this. https://www.indeed.com/forum/job/automotive-technician/can-t-do-it-anymore/t459836
  2. Do you want the The HARDCORE TRUTH to Finding, Attracting, Hiring, And Keeping Top Techs? Sign up (for free) here for access to my brand new mini series: http://bit.ly/find-techs. Video One Coming Monday, 11/5... MORE DETAILS AND REGISTRATION: http://bit.ly/find-techs
  3. Free webinar for all members hosted by @Ron Ipach from Captain Car Count! As you already know, finding good, qualified technicians isn’t as easy as it was in years past. Gone are the days of simply placing a few ads online or in the newspaper help-wanted section. When you combine the fact that more shops than ever are in the hunt for qualified applicants, with the ever-shrinking pool of technicians to draw from, it’s no wonder so many shop owners are frustrated with their search. Attracting good technicians today requires a radically different approach, and on this highly informative online training event, Ron Ipach, president of Repair Shop Coach, will walk you through the same strategies that his clients are using to attract lots of highly qualified to their shops on a consistent basis. CLICK HERE TO REGISTER Time slots vary and are held weekly: Please reach out to @Ron Ipach for additional information.
  4. So this year I have taken my shop towards the next level and am at a point where I need good advice and wisdom before proceeding. I went from a one bay facility to a two bay facility and added a second lift. I am the only person working. I am looking for an employee so I can get out of the shop and start doing sales and management. I have spent a lot of money over the last years in business on tools and equipment. I need to grow because I am just way too busy and slammed with work quite frequently and staying very late at the shop to complete tasks. I have very little personal time and need to delegate. Several large ticket repairs often cause my schedule to back up. I plan to save up money to hire a good technician and to be able to start them out and have money for the hard times until I can get them up to the "speed of trust". I have worked at shops in the past and have seen employee turnover and have seen where we found a great technician but the boss couldn't pay on time for whatever reason and the tech would end up leaving. I don't want to be in that situation. Question 1: I need to know should I be looking for a master tech or maybe a mid level tech who knows their way around??? I dont really want to take on an apprentice because I don't have time to train them and babysit them. I want someone who can hit the ground running. It would be nice to turn them loose and not have to worry about the repairs they are doing. I want to make an employee handbook and agreement for shop procedures, cleaning, showing up on time, policies, etc. so they will know up front what is expected. Question 2: What should I expect to pay them? Salary, flat rate, bonus, a combonation of any of these? Starting pay vs normal pay? Question 3: How did you go from a one man army to having employees and bigger successes? I really don't need help to find one at the moment although I am open to suggestions but I want to focus on the questions at hand. I am a good tech but I am also not the fastest because I am picky and want things done right. Call it OCD or whatever but I don't like come backs. I am also a great service adviser and would rather have a tech doing the work so I can run the business. Thank you
  5. Perhaps the worst time to look to hire a technician, is when we lose one. At that point we go into “Crisis Hire” mode. We most often settle for anyone, rather than taking our time to find the right person. We need to take a lesson from large organizations and sports teams. Their strategy? They continually recruit. I did not say continually hire, I said continually recruit. You need to be on the look out for the talent in your community. Find where the best of the best are working now. Reach out to these people, get to know them. Make is part of your overall business plan to stay in touch with trade schools, the military for returning vets, and any other employee agencies. Identify key people in your local auto community and ask questions; where are the best technicians? How can I contact this person? Who knows this superstar tech? In other words, allocate a significant portion of your time in the area of recruiting. Your goal is to have people in the pipe line. So when you lose an employee you have a list of contacts to reach out to. In the book “Work Rules”, a book about Google and its employee strategies, the author states that Google follows this rule: “Hiring is the single most important activity in any organization"
  6. Ever had an employee that spreads doom and gloom throughout the shop? You know the one; the employee that damages morale, complains about everything, comes in late, and is miserable all the time. And, after trying to fix him, you realize that you can’t. But, “He’s a great producer”, you tell yourself. Well, is he? The fact is, if you have a poison employee, ask yourself this, “What damage is he doing to the rest of the shop?” Also, how is he damaging the morale of the shop? What production loss is occurring that is due to his attitude? Consider this; you, as the leader of the company must have the support and respect of everyone. If you allow the bad apple to stay, others in the shop will not feel you are a leader that cares about everyone. They will think you only care about the bad apple’s production. They will think you value money first, and people last. When this happens, the rest of your team will begin to shut down, morale will continue to suffer, and so will production. Here’s another scenario you are familiar with too. When you do finally get rid of the bad apple, the others will rejoice and tell you, “Well, it’s about time boss!”
  7. Years back, when I was looking to hire a technician, my first criteria would be the person’s skill level. In fact, I mainly based my decision on the tech’s skill, ASE certifications, and experience. The result? High turnover. Now, I look for character first. Is the person I am looking to hire the right fit for my shop? Does this person have right character? After that trait I look for talent. With the right character and talent, we can teach them the skills. Obviously the tech needs to be technically proficient, but hiring people based on skill alone is not the recipe for a long term profitable business plan. The most important component when hiring is ensuring that the person you are hiring is the right fit for your company.
  8. Before you call me crazy, please read on. Your tools, your technical ability and your equipment are all components of your business. And of course you cannot conduct business without these components. But, the real key to your success is who you hire and how you manage your employees. In addition, morale has more to do with worker engagement than any other element of your business. And engaged workers are more productive, have less comebacks, take less sick days and contribute to the growth of your business. We all know one undeniable fact: Happy workers create happy customers and happy customers put you in a position to win. Think of it this way; what wins baseball games? Is the stadium? Is it the training equipment? Is the beautifully manicured field? The baseball bat? The baseball? These are elements of the game, but it’s the quality of the players, combined with their drive to be the best, that ultimately determines success and win games. Hire the best talent, work real hard to keep morale up, and do all you can to bring out the best in all your employees. Do this, and the rest will fall into place.
  9. I am not here to judge anyone or tell someone how to run their business. But, here is situation that bothers me. I was recently at a shop council meeting and one of the shop owners told that his master tech, a man in his mid 30s cannot get a bank loan to buy a house. When he told ne what he was paying him, I asked him, "That is a real good salary, why can't he get a loan?" He went on to tell me that this tech has only worked for him for 9 months and all his other jobs were either "off the books" or partially off the books. So his last three years of tax returns do not look all the good. I am not naïve or going to tell anyone that I am a Saint. But, this got me thinking. Is this just another one of the reasons why we are plagued with image issues and maybe a reason why many shops struggle? Let me play devil's advocate here. Isn't it true that the best run shops and the most profitable are those that are 100% legitimate. I will leave it right there....
  10. Hire right, train right, then get out the way In his book, Good to Great, Jim Collins discusses the attributes of what makes a company not just good, but great. One of those attributes is finding the right people. Here’s a quote from the book. “They (a company) start by getting the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats.” I learned the hard way that having the wrong people can severely hurt the business. To be successful, we need to hire the right people, train those people and then get out of their way and let them do their job. Ask yourself: Do you have the right people? If you don’t, you need to make changes. If you do, make sure you do all you can to train and empower these people to perform at their best.


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