Quantcast
Jump to content


Recommended Posts

This is not new topic for me, but I need to revisit it again. And I will keep revisiting this topic for the sake of our industry. 

For independent repair shops to "thrive" today, you must take a proactive approach with regard to business.  If you only want to "survive" you can stop reading now.

Waiting for the phone to ring, or for cars to breakdown, or for a customer to drive into your shop asking for a repair or service is business suicide. The days of broken cars lining up in front of your bays are over.  Sure, cars still breakdown, but you cannot thrive with a wait-and-see strategy.

Make sure you perform multipoint inspections on all cars in for any type of service. Yes, any type of service or repair.  Look up vehicle history on all vehicles. Let the customer know of needed services, missed services and services due. And lastly, book the next appointment.   Yes, I know....Joe's been preaching this over and over and it does not work in your shop. Fine, then let me focus on those shops that do book the next appointment.  Because those are the shops that are adopting a proactive approach...and I will see those shops in the future.

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Forum Topics

    • By Joe Marconi
      We sell service, not products. Yes, we sell water pumps, brake pads and air filters. And yes, those are products. But it’s the service we sell, the customer experience, which lives on well beyond the customer leaves your shop.

      Think of it this way; when you buy a watch, or a new cell phone, the experience of what you purchase continues after the sale. When we replace a customer’s water pump or air filter, there is very little about those items that lives on beyond the sale.

      But, what does live on is the customer experience. The better the experience, the more likely the customer will return to you.  So focus on the customer experience, not the products you install.

    • By Ajit
      While looking for absentee investments, I found a self-storage and Auto repair shop on sale. The purchase price is small and also cash flow is very high to ignore.
      But, I am a Software Engineer and I am New to running a Business leave alone an Auto repair. The shop is 2 hrs drive from my home. The owner is ready to provide 2d/week consulting service, and lone other mechanic is ready to work with new owner. Plenty of cash transactions. No computers to log work orders. Specialist in exhaust systems. The mechanic is not insured. Shop and storage has some level of insurance. Small town and original owner ran business from the shop for 33 years. Now wants to retire.
      I have plans to modernize the work orders and add cameras for remote tracking. I will have to add one more mechanic, and then trust mechanics and also introduce softwares to increase transparency.
      For someone who is interested in Auto repair in general, do you think its good business to run as absentee? I plan to spend few hours at the shop once a week and less frequently later. I am 40 year old, I think right time for me to start a business and get off the corporate world.
      Please advice. Appreciate.
    • By Joe Marconi
      Here's a tip I have posted before, but it's worth repeating. 
      One job that goes unnoticed most of the year is the job of the part's driver.  You get part deliveries all day long, every day, all year long.  Many times, these part's drivers take all the abuse due to wrong parts, the parts took too long to be delivered, on and on and on.  Those drivers may not say anything, but they take it to heart. 
      So, here's what you are going to do.  Buy small gifts, such as small boxes of candy or chocolate.  Nothing expensive.  During the holidays, give all the drivers one of these small gifts and say "Thank you, I appreciated what you do."
      Two things will happen. First, the driver will be stunned and will not know what to say, and they will be very thankful that you thought of them. 
      The second thing that will happen is this:  The very next time those part drivers have three delivers to make at three different shops, what shop do you think they will want to go to first?  Yes...Yours!
       
    • By bantar
      It seems that Goodyear corporate stores are changing their business model from Tire and Repair Service centers to strictly tires.   The franchise stores are free to continue their old business model.    Around here, the corporate stores are going to close down on January 27 for 2-3 weeks for a major remodel and possibly? rebranding.   They will sell tires and do alignments, but will not be able to align if they need repair parts.   I've not seen any official statements on this, so I don't really know more than the scuttlebutt.
      It looks like Hunter will have a great year this year as a result.  I saw a brand new Hunter Revolution tire machine in one of the local stores already.
      I stand to benefit from this change as we may see some of their repair business.   Since I don't sell tires, I'm not a Goodyear competitor, which allows them to safely refer repair business to us.   Almost everyone else around here sells tires.   We refer quite a few folks to tire-only stores, so Goodyear will now be on my referral list.
    • By KDshopNEA
      Hey All,
      My name is Karla, I had previously owned a 3-bay mechanical repair shop in Burlington, VT for 6 years and built it to maintain an outstanding reputation and provide a comfortable income. I had the opportunity to sell my half of the business and finalized that deal this past fall. I have worked in all areas of the auto repair industry over the past 15 years, graduated from a two-year ASE certified auto tech program and went on to earn my Bachelor’s in business and a masters degree in executive leadership. 
      I have some capital I will be contributing to the planning and opening of a new shop and am very open to meeting potential partners/investors in all areas of the country. I greatly look forward to building something new in a location new to me.
      Anyway, I’d like to welcome all /any interest and to answer any questions about joining forces in shop planning and management. Please do not hesitate to contact me, thanks for considering!
      —Karla
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors

  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By Joe Marconi
      In my opinion, competition is actually good for the industry, and good for your repair shop too.  It keeps us focused and forces us to maintain pace with other repair shops.  It drives us to take a look at our own business to see where and how we can make improvements.
      Don't worry about the competition.  And never compete on your competition's features. Find what sets you apart; your differentiation factor.  Deliver world class service and promote your culture to your employees.  
      So, how do we handle the competition?  Learn from them, but don't copy them.  Become the best you can be.  Promote a culture of customer caring with your employees. The rest will take care of itself.
      Your thoughts?
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      We sell service, not products. Yes, we sell water pumps, brake pads and air filters. And yes, those are products. But it’s the service we sell, the customer experience, which lives on well beyond the customer leaves your shop.

      Think of it this way; when you buy a watch, or a new cell phone, the experience of what you purchase continues after the sale. When we replace a customer’s water pump or air filter, there is very little about those items that lives on beyond the sale.

      But, what does live on is the customer experience. The better the experience, the more likely the customer will return to you.  So focus on the customer experience, not the products you install.

    • By Joe Marconi
      Here's a tip I have posted before, but it's worth repeating. 
      One job that goes unnoticed most of the year is the job of the part's driver.  You get part deliveries all day long, every day, all year long.  Many times, these part's drivers take all the abuse due to wrong parts, the parts took too long to be delivered, on and on and on.  Those drivers may not say anything, but they take it to heart. 
      So, here's what you are going to do.  Buy small gifts, such as small boxes of candy or chocolate.  Nothing expensive.  During the holidays, give all the drivers one of these small gifts and say "Thank you, I appreciated what you do."
      Two things will happen. First, the driver will be stunned and will not know what to say, and they will be very thankful that you thought of them. 
      The second thing that will happen is this:  The very next time those part drivers have three delivers to make at three different shops, what shop do you think they will want to go to first?  Yes...Yours!
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      A few weeks back I had a problem with my refrigerator.  I got a referral and called an appliance repair company. I called three times and each time I called this is what happened: "C and E appliance, please hold."  I was put on hold three times for about 5 minutes. After being put on hold each time, a women would say, "What's the problem?"  No engagement, no sign of interest for me the customer, no signs of caring.  I gave the women a brief description of the problem and each time she told me someone would call me back.  Well, no one did.
      So, I called for the 4th time, and as the person answered the phone I said, "DO NOT PUT ME ON HOLD."  There was silence, so I continued.  I explained to her that she has spoken to me three times,  I left messages three times and three times you told me that someone would call me back.  She replied,  "You are talking to the wrong person, if you have any complaints, write a letter to my boss, after all he won't listen to me anyway."  I hung up the phone and called another company.
      The lesson and takeaway here is simple: Who's answering your phone?  The wrong people on the phone in your shop can kill your business.  Have meetings with your people. Make sure you review your phone skills policy. If you don't have one, create one.  Empower your people to people to handle issues. And make sure you log every phone call. If you feel you have a problem, start recording phone calls. 
      Your phone is your lifeline to future business.  So, please ask yourself....Who's answering your phone? 
       


×