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Joe Marconi

Your Auto Repair Shop is only as good as your employees

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If there is one thing I have learned in my 36 years in business, it’s that people make the biggest difference in terms of success. No matter what equipment you have, or tools or information system. It’s the quality of your employees that will determine your success.

Think about this. If you were the coach of a football team and your goal was to win the Super Bowl, what would be your first goal?  To assemble the best players possible, a team of superstar athletes. The fanciest stadium on the planet does not win games. It takes great players and a great coach.  And a great coach understands that he needs to surround himself with superstars.

Your repair shop is no different. If you want to attain great success, it will be achieved not only by your work, but by the work of others around you.  Your success is truly determined by the having the right people and then by bringing out the best in them.  

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