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bobbyt

Planning to Buy running auto repair shop..

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Hello to everyone from Houston TX.

 

I need some advice on buying a running auto repair shop..But I am not a car mechanic..

 

I have a full time computer programmer job from last 15 years.I make decent living. But from a while now I am planing to own my business.

 

I am ready to quit my job and work full time on the business.

 

Typically I see if I buy a running shop, I will get 4 weeks of training from existing owner and my plan is to hire the owner as manager from another 3 months to make sure, I get enough time to settle in.

 

My only concern, without knowledge of cars know/how. can I run business successfully? How would I know what my mechanics are working on, how much time does it take to work on a job ? How do I hire new mechanics etc?

 

Any advice is highly appreciated!

 

 

Best

Bobby

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