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Jay Huh

Best books for owners and entrepreneurs

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This post was prompted bc of another post- but wondering on the most influential and helpful books out there that you have read and wanted to share.

 

For me, it was

How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

Great book I think every entrepreneur should read. I want to try and read a book a week

Edited by Jay Huh
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