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John Pearson

The best thing I ever did for my business.

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I am a nice guy like really nice guy, and with that I make a terrible service writer. I am always trying to give people a deal, or not charge diag, or hear how someone is broke and let them make payments and never get paid.

 

The best thing I ever did for my business was get out from behind the computer. I still come out of the shop to interact with customers, talk to them, explain things and meet them but I stay away from that damn computer.

 

Part of it is our reputation has grown and word of mouth has spread, but with my service writer taking over things we are seeing double the sales that we saw last year in this first quarter.

 

 

What is the best thing that you have ever done, or not done for your business?

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