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Joe Marconi

Why Are Some Shops Afraid of Charging for Analysis?

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Sometimes I feel like I’m alone on a deserted island. I charge for diagnostic analysis. Why? Because I know what cost is to buy the tools, equipment, information systems, training and pay a technician to professionally and accurately diagnosis a check engine light, air bag, ABS or any other complicated problem. But, I feel a lot of shops are willing to give this up in hopes to get the work. In my opinion all they are doing is digging themselves in a hole.

 

And, I have heard all the reasons:

“If the customer gives me the job, I waive the analysis”.

“I package the analysis into the repair, so the customer does not see the diag charges”

“I will lose customers if I charge analysis”

And the best yet: “It only took me 10 minutes to diag the O2 sensor, so I can’t charge diag labor”.

 

Waiving the analysis is the same as a doctor waiving the x-rays and blood tests. They don’t do it, we should not either. I will also challenge those who “package” the analysis into the repair. You mean to tell me that after taking 1 hour to find a faulty mass air sensor, you will add the 1 hour to the 5 minutes it takes to install a new mass air? Come on, we all know the truth.

 

And let’s address the 10 minutes it took to find the failed O2 sensor. Did it really take 10 minutes? NO, it took years of training, years of experience, the investment in the right equipment and the investment in the right information systems. Why we sometimes diminish what we are truly worth is amazing. No other profession does that.

 

Sorry for being so tough on this topic, but business is hard enough these days and people question everything. If shops don’t realize what they are giving up, it makes it bad for all of us.

 

Please tell me what you think. Agree? Disagree? Or any other thoughts....

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