Quantcast
Jump to content


Recommended Posts



  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 8 months later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Topics

    • By ASOG Podcast
      Looking through the videos taken at #aapex and #sema. This event is simply can't-miss.
    • By Joe Marconi
      One of the thing that has been brought to the forefront during this employee-shortage era, is the fact that we need to increase the pay salaries of the average technician and service advisor.  In my opinion, we need to increase the pay for entry level people also. Other industries have done, we must also. 
      If we are to attract quality people and retain who we have employed, we need to address this issue now. 
    • By CAautogroup
      Hello all,
       
      We used to get paid for used motor oil (pre-COVID19). However, lately we are being charged for pick up and transport. We go through approximately 500-700 gallons per month. 
      Do you guys currently get paid or are paying for used motor oil and oil filter pick up? Our shop is located in Texas. 
    • By Joe Marconi
      Back in my day, you didn't get a lot of praise from your boss. And, you never really looked for it either. You did your job, and the only way you knew you were doing a good job is if the boss didn't reprimand you.   It was different back when I started, 1974.  Times have changed and the way we manage people has changed too. 
      If you want to motivate people, make sure you praise them when they do a great job. Be sincere and be honest with your praise.  People crave positive feedback from their leaders. By giving praise often, your employees will feel good about themselves. Their self-esteem will get a boost and they will be more likely to repeat that great job again. 
      Now, this is not to say you should ignore when things go wrong.  But make sure you give at least 5 to 8 "at-a-boys" to every one reprimand.  Trust me, fill someone's emotional bank with sufficient "at-a-boys", and they will be more willing to listen to you when they drop the ball. 
    • By Joe Marconi
      This Sept 11 marks 20 year when four planes were hijacked, the Twin Towers were destroyed and 3000 people lost their lives in the terrorist attack.
      The day after, Sept 12, Americans came to together as one.  Let us all once-again reunite as Americans.  
      Let us never forget what happened on September 11, 2001. 


  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By AutoShopOwner
      First-Ever U.S. Auto Tech National Championship Qualifying Event Comes to the Detroit Area September 23rd - 25th
      Regional Qualifying Event Will Determine Top Auto Technician Professionals and Students in National Competition, Culminating with Championship Event in Nashville in December to Compete for Over $200,000 Cash and Prizes
      SYCAMORE, Ill., Sept. 17, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- IDEAL INDUSTRIES, INC., a family business that designs and manufactures products for the professional trades, and Intersport, and independent award-winning marketing agency headquartered in Chicago, have announced the inaugural U.S. Auto Technician National Championship (USATNC) competition. The competition was created this year to celebrate and showcase the incredible skills of auto technician professionals and students across the country. The program centers around a one-of-a-kind competition series, including four months of online and live qualifying challenges across the country to find the best 64 professional (32) and student (32) auto technicians, and brings them together for a national championship event scheduled to take place December 13-14, 2021, in Nashville, TN. A regional qualifying event is open for registration and will take place in Southfield, MI September 23rd – 25th.
      What: US Auto Tech National Championship Qualifying Event
      Who: Professional Auto Technicians and Students/Apprentices
      Where: Garage Gurus 27300 W 11 Mile Rd. Southfield, MI, 48034
      When: Thursday, September 23rd – Saturday, September 25th
      The regional tour qualifying event is one of seven that will determine the 64 finalists who will be invited to Nashville for the Championship event. From the finalists, three professionals and three students will be crowned first, second, and third prize winners, and will divvy up $200,000 in cash and prizes. Sponsors for the USATNC include 7-Eleven, Discount Tire, Duluth Trading, Garage Gurus, Little Giant Ladder Systems, Lucas Oil, ServiceTitan, and the University of Northwestern Ohio.
      Registration for the competition is open at: www.usatnc.com
      For a list of rules, see: https://www.tradesnation.com/us/en/etcs/autotech/official-rules.html
      For additional information, visit: www.usatnc.com
      SOURCE Intersport Inc


    • By Joe Marconi
      Anyone who knows me, knows that I am a big proponent of understanding your numbers, and the need for bottom line profit.  However, we can sometimes get side-tracked by focusing too much on the numbers and not enough on people. 
      I have seen time and time again with struggling shops that have their numbers dialed in properly but can't achieve their goals, and the reason all too often is their culture.
      Focus on people. Find out what's important to them. Your employees have dreams and goals. Find out what they are. Align their goals with company goals. 
      When an employee sees that by achieving company goals, they can achieve their own goals, then you have the right culture and a powerful team. 
    • By Joe Marconi
      With all the talk these days about finding and hiring employees, it's so important that you hold on to the employees you have right now.  
      You may not know it, but there are probably dealers and other repair shops recruiting your employees right now as your read this post! 
      Set up time to sit down with all your employees, as a group and one-on-one. Find out more about them,  their needs, their goals and what's important to them. 
      Make sure you pay program is in line with their needs and provides for their family. It's not all about money, but we need to take care of the basic needs of life first.
      It's hard enough to find employees these days, make sure you keep the ones you have now! 
      Your thoughts? 
    • By Joe Marconi
      Got your attention? Good! Before I start, let’s get something out of the way. Does technician aptitude or attitude affect the productivity of your shop? Absolutely. But this is the exception, not the rule. If your overall production levels are low, that is the sole responsibility of management. Let’s look at a few reasons for low production levels.
      The first area I want to address is billing. Many hours of labor go unbilled due to not understanding how to charge. This area is most prevalent with testing and inspecting. If your technicians are handed a work order, with no direction and not a clear process of what to do, or when to stop and ask for labor testing fees, there will be a ton of wasted labor hours, never to be recovered again.
      Next is training. Service advisor and technical training is a key component to high production levels. But let’s not forget in-house training. All policies and procedures must be reviewed often and refined if needed. Your team must follow a process. With no road map, labor dollars are lost. By the way, if you don’t have procedures in place, you need to make this top priority. Every successful organization has a detailed set of workflow guidelines.
      Let’s look at shop layout. How organized is your shop? Are shop tools and equipment readily accessible? Or do techs tend to wander around looking for the shop scanner or TPMS reset tool. Are stock items such as wiper blades and oil filters fully stocked and cataloged properly? Do technicians have separate access to technical information? Or are techs waiting to use the same computer station? Again, all these things kill labor production, which kills labor dollars.
      Next up is scheduling. There should be a structured approach to scheduling where the day is balanced with enough opportunity to make profitable sales. Have a process where vehicle history is reviewed before the customer arrives. Any previous service recommendations or notes is any opportunity to make a sale. But the key ingredient is in preparation. A customer that’s scheduled for an oil change may have forgotten that he or she received a recommendation for tires. Informing the customer at the time of scheduling and preparing for the work ahead of time, greatly improves productivity and overall efficiency.
      Another problem area is with service advisors and their workload. The service advisor, in many situations, handles the front counter, the phone, scheduling, helps with dispatch, part procurement and sales. All these tasks are critical to the daily operations. However, nothing happens in the shop until a sale is made. You need to look at your service staff. Are estimates getting processed quickly and upsells getting back to the technicians in a timely manner? If not, this is another area where production suffers. Carefully analyze your staff and run the numbers. More estimates processed means more sales and higher profits. Adding a service advisor or an assistant may be the missing link in a shop’s production problem.
      Knowing your numbers is another key component to attaining high production levels. I will refrain from giving you benchmark numbers, since all businesses models are different. With that said, you need to determine your breakeven and establish your labor goal for the week. Then knowing your labor goal, you need to calculate how many labor hours you need per technician. Then, you need to communicate this number to each technician. Having clear expectations and knowing the goals of one’s position is essential for hitting production goals.
      With regard to the technician’s responsibility, let’s remember one important fact; the technician has control over his or her efficiency. That’s it. If you dispatch a four-hour ticket to a tech, the ability of the tech to meet or beat that time depends on the technician’s skill, experience and training.
      There are a lot of other factors that influence production, such as the right pay plan and hiring the right people. But perhaps the most important influence is leadership. The shop owner or manager must study and look at the entire operations of the shop. Productivity goals must be established and then a system of monitoring production must be put into place. This includes sales goals, as well. Service advisors and technicians must get continuous feedback on their progress. Improvements in sales and in production, no matter how small, must be celebrated.
      The bottom line is this: If you’re not happy with your production level, you need to look at every aspect of your company that influences production. Improvements in key areas put technicians in a position to win. When they win, so do you.
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on March 1st, 2019


      View full article
    • By Joe Marconi
      I am not one to get political, and there are people that really need help in these times.  Let me be clear about that.  
      With that said, the added $600 in most cases has caused more of an incentive NOT to work.  I don't know the answer on how to distinguish who clarifies for extra help, but what I do know is that when people can make more money for sitting at home, it takes away the human spirit to go out and make a difference every day through hard work and community involvement. 
      It also does not sit well with so many of the essential workers that have worked through the virus crisis, and put themselves in harms way to keep American moving. 
      How do feel about this?  I know it's controversial. Let's be open, honest and civil.
       
  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...