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I was wondering how many shops charge for everything that goes into a repair? For example, zip ties, dielectric grease, clamps, bulbs, fuses, heat shrink , butt connectors, etc. It seems to me some shops have a "shop supplies" charge and let it go at that. Other shops do a great job of getting everything on the invoice and then also have a "job supplies" ( not shop supplies, because it is for the job, not shop ) to cover consumables.  Of the shops that are getting everything on the invoice, what is your advice on making that happen? How do you do it?

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