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Do you guys think about the future of automotive business?


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Saw a Tesla the other day at the mall with it completely stripped down.

Has tires with tie rods connected to the steering column and a self contained motor at the rear.

 

No oil, no spark plugs, no moving components.... everything electronic.... NOTHING to replace but tires and possibly brakes every 100,000 miles.

 

Is this the future? How long, in 20 years? 15 years? I'm 30 and I think I will be good by the time I retire but a completely different story for the next generation. Gotta think too, as we start transitioning over, there will be less and less work for the numerous number of automotive shops out there. Just in my shopping center alone, there are 5 major shops and 1 more across the street. In our 5 mile radius, there has got to be more than 20

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Well, ya know, I have been watching this development and pondering what effects the Tesla line will have on our industry. Obviously, there is no way we can be sure of what all will happen, my thought is that in the next number of years there will be more electric vehicles. However, that will be only for the commuters. So far, I have not seen anything much beyond the car level in the electric vehicle field. Probably half of the vehicles we work on here are diesels. And with the diesel engines getting much more efficient than earlier ones, I predict they will be around for a long time and give us alot of work for many years.

Will the Tesla line and other lines push us out of competition with the dealers? Probably not. Will it affect us? Yes it will. How much? Wait and see.For the shops that are up to the challenge of diversity, there is opportunities. For others, its going down a dead end road. The developing technology is slowly sorting the men from the boys.

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Self driving cars that drive themselves back to the dealership for service could be a concern.

 

That was my first thought when I started considering what self driving cars mean for our industry. I think about this subject quite often as I have a young son that is really interested in our industry.

 

I agree there will be parts to replace and repair, but it could be a very different market. Look at all of the changes to our industry over the last 2 or 3 decades and you see that some adapt and others go away. This particular issue may be a little different than what we have seen in the past though. Google and Apple are both interested in the self driving car market. If we have learned anything from watching them change the world, we have learned that they will do it in a way no one else has. I do not feel that self driving or electric cars will ruin our industry, but it could be a very different place. Here is my concern: If the cars can completely drive themselves, then I am willing to bet there are very little reasons to own a car if you live anywhere near a metropolitan area. Why have a payment and one sitting in the driveway when you can use an app on your phone and a car will come pick you up whenever you need it? You will pay for what you use and all of the other hassles of car ownership are no longer a burden to you. The companies doing this (think Apple and Google) will most likely have their own facilities and probably will not need the independent repair facility at all. These cars may not go to the dealer, but they won't come to you either.

 

There will always be those of us who love to drive and own our own vehicles, but the more customers that I run into that have no idea of what year/make/model of the car that THEY PURCHASED, makes me wonder how many people really care to own one.... I'm willing to be that the majority of people only own vehicles 100% out of necessity. That necessity may be a little less necessary in the future.

 

(disclaimer: these are just my thoughts with no real data to back it up!)

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That was my first thought when I started considering what self driving cars mean for our industry. I think about this subject quite often as I have a young son that is really interested in our industry.

 

I agree there will be parts to replace and repair, but it could be a very different market. Look at all of the changes to our industry over the last 2 or 3 decades and you see that some adapt and others go away. This particular issue may be a little different than what we have seen in the past though. Google and Apple are both interested in the self driving car market. If we have learned anything from watching them change the world, we have learned that they will do it in a way no one else has. I do not feel that self driving or electric cars will ruin our industry, but it could be a very different place. Here is my concern: If the cars can completely drive themselves, then I am willing to bet there are very little reasons to own a car if you live anywhere near a metropolitan area. Why have a payment and one sitting in the driveway when you can use an app on your phone and a car will come pick you up whenever you need it? You will pay for what you use and all of the other hassles of car ownership are no longer a burden to you. The companies doing this (think Apple and Google) will most likely have their own facilities and probably will not need the independent repair facility at all. These cars may not go to the dealer, but they won't come to you either.

 

There will always be those of us who love to drive and own our own vehicles, but the more customers that I run into that have no idea of what year/make/model of the car that THEY PURCHASED, makes me wonder how many people really care to own one.... I'm willing to be that the majority of people only own vehicles 100% out of necessity. That necessity may be a little less necessary in the future.

 

(disclaimer: these are just my thoughts with no real data to back it up!)

Bingo! Not owning and maintaining a vehicle is gaining ground. Heck if you tell a customer they need Tires they are ready to trade it in.

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That was my first thought when I started considering what self driving cars mean for our industry. I think about this subject quite often as I have a young son that is really interested in our industry.

 

I agree there will be parts to replace and repair, but it could be a very different market. Look at all of the changes to our industry over the last 2 or 3 decades and you see that some adapt and others go away. This particular issue may be a little different than what we have seen in the past though. Google and Apple are both interested in the self driving car market. If we have learned anything from watching them change the world, we have learned that they will do it in a way no one else has. I do not feel that self driving or electric cars will ruin our industry, but it could be a very different place. Here is my concern: If the cars can completely drive themselves, then I am willing to bet there are very little reasons to own a car if you live anywhere near a metropolitan area. Why have a payment and one sitting in the driveway when you can use an app on your phone and a car will come pick you up whenever you need it? You will pay for what you use and all of the other hassles of car ownership are no longer a burden to you. The companies doing this (think Apple and Google) will most likely have their own facilities and probably will not need the independent repair facility at all. These cars may not go to the dealer, but they won't come to you either.

 

There will always be those of us who love to drive and own our own vehicles, but the more customers that I run into that have no idea of what year/make/model of the car that THEY PURCHASED, makes me wonder how many people really care to own one.... I'm willing to be that the majority of people only own vehicles 100% out of necessity. That necessity may be a little less necessary in the future.

 

(disclaimer: these are just my thoughts with no real data to back it up!)

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I have thought abut this also. In the major city's I can see this but in the rural community's there is no way. Can you see sending a car 10 miles out into the country to get a farmer then going back. Remember they, milinums want it now not in half and hour.

Just my thought.

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I think its important that as service professionals we understand that technology will always change and as long as we adapt to these changes we will always be a choice for motorists service.

 

We may not be changing spark plugs but something will sure needs maintenance and service. Point and condensers are no more but look at ignition coils...they still break. If not replacing power steering pumps we are replacing electric steering motors.

 

Change is inevitable in any industry, it is those who are willing to adapt survive and grow.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • 3 months later...
 
Major litigation I foresee if that ever happens. Who knows who will win. Dealers and car makers have deep pockets...


I would bet that major aftermarket part, tool and tire manufacturers would be willing to step up. Snapon, Napa and Firestone might fight.

Sent from my SM-T800 using Tapatalk

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My thoughts on servicing the next gen cars?

Everything breaks. Lefty loosey, Righty tighty.

There was a time that guys were leery of servicing disc brakes. They would all obviously have to go back to the dealer. Then it was computer controls. Then fuel injection. Then flashing computers. And on and on.

Bring it.

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Things have come a long long way since I have been fixing cars just over 26 years, but how far and how fast is relative. I mean we use to only have black and white tv and you had to get up and change the channel. Now you have 4k and a remote. The tv still does the same basic function provide a picture and sound. (just a whole lot more complicated) Cars had carbs, points, condensers, had key locks and ignitions, now Fuel injection , electronic ignition , Key fobs, and push button starting, all in all the same beast .(just a whole lot more complicated) (just like TV) . that being said things may change but is it always for the best? taking something simple and making it  more efficient and a whole lot more complicated. How fast can things develop? For some of us it seems like a whole lot has changed for the younger ones not so much. When I was a kid they said by the time I was old enough to drive, cars would fly. Well that hasn't happened, yes you have a couple prototype flying cars but that is it, so yes we have some electric cars but how long will it take till it is a great enough product and affordable for the common folk? So I think the real future of cars is more of what we have today (just a whole lot more complicated) its all relative !

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  • 2 years later...
On 12/13/2016 at 9:20 AM, Trealubit said:

I think its important that as service professionals we understand that technology will always change and as long as we adapt to these changes we will always be a choice for motorists service.

 

We may not be changing spark plugs but something will sure needs maintenance and service. Point and condensers are no more but look at ignition coils...they still break. If not replacing power steering pumps we are replacing electric steering motors.

 

Change is inevitable in any industry, it is those who are willing to adapt survive and grow.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

My thoughts too.  About the only thing that concerns me is the cost for the equipment to service the increasing complex technology.  For an example, just look at the glass companies and how complex just replacing a windshield has become.  We all know the expense of new equipment and how often the manufacturers like to change their scan tools.  I think it will get to the point where small general service shops, such as in rural areas, small towns and tech turned shop owners will struggle to be properly equipped.  Make no mistake about it, much of this specialized service technology versus generic standardized technology is intended to do only one thing, FORCE consumers back to the dealerships.  In smartphone operating systems we have basically two, CRapple iOS and (You have NO privacy) Android, with PCs we basically have Windows and CRapple iOS and (You have NO privacy) Chrome.  But with only a few choices most software has a version for both and it's relatively cheap to set up shop to develop software programs in each.  But in our profession we have as many different "operating systems" as we have manufacturers, which is far more than three.

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Well, the book stores didn't worry about selling books on-line. But Amazon changed that. 
Online dating was creepy 10 years ago. Today it's the norm. 
Who would let their daughter get in a car with a total stranger? Uber changed a lot of that. 
The hotel industry got blind-sided by Air BnB. 

And if that's not enough, countless other industries are being changed RIGHT NOW in ways most never even thought about. 
To top it off - it's been said that the focus of Tesla and self driving is to take out the Ubers and Lyfts of this world. Auto repair shops would just be
the collateral damage. 

Can't predict the future, but 1,000's of business owners watched while some "crazy" idea "ate their lunch". 

I know it's not the rosey picture you're looking for - but don't bury your head in the sand. 
 

Hope this help!

Matthew
"The Car Count Fixer"
Subscribe on YouTube@ Car Count Hackers - Follow Car Count Hackers on Facebook!

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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