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I will have met the 30 month commitment to this consulting company in Feb 2017. I'm wondering if anyone here has had any trouble with them when exiting?

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    • Article: Three Gallons of Trouble - gas gauge and attitudes

      3 GALLONS OF TROUBLE        It was shortly after opening time when one of my long time regular customers  brought their teenage son into the shop for a little discussion and repair time.   The father and I go way back, and he knew I'm not one to take a lot of gruff,  especially before coffee.  He looked at his son and told him, “Gonzo, probably  hasn’t had his coffee yet so go easy on the old guy,” he said with a quick  little nod and wink in my direction.     He was right about the coffee, but that still didn’t prepare me for the story  I was about to hear.      The story started sometime earlier, apparently after I changed the fuel pump   some two years ago. It had to do with his gas mileage.  Apparently, his  incredibly detailed fuel charts  that listed every fill up, time, date, and the exact  mileage there was always a 3 gallon discrepancy.  All traced back to the very  day I put the fuel pump in over two years ago.  He was concerned, no, let me  rephrase that, he was extremely upset and insisted that I was the cause of all  this, and obviously, I must have done something wrong.         His insistence that I was to blame was backed up by his anal retentive log book of every liquid that every entered his trucks orifices.  Everything was tracked by way of his trip odometer.  Before the new fuel pump he would get close to 400 miles per tank.  His accuracy was to be commended. Not a lot of people go to this amount of effort to calculate the different seasonal fuel changes and how it affects the overall mileage with a cross reference to the previous year and then highlight long trips in a different colored highlighter with notations about wind speed and weather conditions, or which direction he was traveling,  With all this cross checking, geological mapping, GPS location, and weather pattern charts there still was this 3 gallon gap.       Each fill up averaged right around 23 gallons from empty, and never a drop more than 23 gallons.  But now,  his fuel tank was holding 26 gallons. His question, “So, where is the other 3 gallons going?”  I tried not laugh, I’ve changed a lot of fuel pumps but I never have had anyone come in and tell me that there fuel tank now holds more fuel than before.  The dad smirk was getting wider and wider as the story and his teen aged son's lack of making me believe his story increased his volume and temper.  The whole time, good ol' dad just sat there with that look on his face as if to silently tell me, "You're turn... I'll just watch."     “I’m pretty sure your gas tank hasn’t increased in volume since a fuel pump has been changed.  I would imagine you’re probably mistaken as to how much your tank actually holds.  Did you ever check your owners manual by chance? ” I told him, as I reached for my coffee.      Nope, he wasn’t buying that.  He knew how much his gas tank has 'always' held and he knew I was the cause of his lost mileage.        The more I tried to explain, the more upset he was getting.  He was quite sure (and demanding) that he was correct and that I wasn’t listening to what he was saying.  By now he was quite loud and belligerent over the whole matter. Poor old dad, laid a hand on his son's shoulder, but the boy just shrugged it off and continued on his rampant dissertation of fuel mileage vs. fuel tank volume.  At that point, I kinda figured dad had already had enough of his boy’s attitude and figured old Gonzo was going to straighten him out.  (This is going to take a lot more coffee…better start another pot.)      The aggravated son then began to tell me how good a mechanic he was, because he had rebuilt a few motors in the past so… he knew his way around under  the hood.  Then he added to his story with the usual, “I went to one of those parts stores that will read codes for you… they said the reason for the check engine light was because of a bad gas cap.”        Now there's a new twist, oh wait I've got it now.  As long as the fuel mileage was the only issue it's safe to say you would have kept driving around with this attitude that I must have screwed something up, but... as soon as the check engine light comes on and another scrappy teenager with a code reader tells you that it's caused by a gas cap you put it together... and what do you know... it's Gonzo's fault.  I can see the whole scenario now, he was grasping at possible reasons why his gas mileage had dropped so much and now he's got some confirmation.  What gets me is how something as important as the involvement of the service light wasn't brought up sooner into the conversation but what is important is to tell me how good a tech you are and that you have already made this seemingly incompetent decision that I was to blame.       So at this point, we have a service light on, we have a supposed loss of fuel economy (sort of), and I’m sure there is more… there is always more… I had to ask, “Anything else?”         On occasions the ABS light comes on… he had that checked too.  This time he consulted the ever faithful internet.  He tells me in a loud forceful voice… as if I couldn’t hear anything he was saying, “That always means it’s time to rebuild the ABS controller.”          Oh yea, I do that every day… I take the controllers apart and remove the epoxy sealer over the circuit boards and remove the effected components on the board and then reseal the whole thing back together. Sure it can be done, but not cheaply, and it sure isn't going to change that 3 gallons of fuel in the tank.  All this before my first cup of coffee?      Finally, dad convinced the son to dropped the truck off.  I went straight to the glove box and checked the owner’s manual for the fuel tank capacity.  It had it in big bold letters… 26 gallon capacity… not 23 as he was so sure of.     Just to be sure,  I checked the tune up parts and the filters… all looked great.  The next thing was to tackle the check engine light.  Yes there was a code, well a code that might lower gas mileage… sort of… but not by 3 gallons.  It was the evap solenoid valve code, P0449.  After testing the circuit and the valve it turned out the valve was at fault.  A new evap solenoid valve solved the problem.  As far as the ABS… nothing, not a thing, no codes, no history codes, and the system was working normally.  A drive test showed no problems but I gave him the benefit of doubt that he may have an intermittent ABS controller problem… however when I gave him the options of leaving it alone or changing it… he left it alone.     After all the phone calls were made and dad and son arrived to pick up the truck there was never another mention of the so called missing 3 gallons or the fact that it was merely the original fuel sender that was reading improperly all this time.  Or the fact that the loose gas cap had nothing to do with the service light either.       I guess when you’re wrong you don’t have to admit it, at least when you're a teenager, and dad is paying the bill.  But, you can be darn sure, if the mechanic is wrong, it's time to scream in his face, accuse him of incompetence, and let everyone else know about it, and write some review about, and then ask for your money back.  Welcome to the world of auto repair and some of the strangest customer reactions you'll ever run into.        Oh, and I apologies for being the mechanic in this story, and I guess I should apologies for one more thing…..  Writing in BIG letters on his invoice… YOUR TANK HOLDS 26 GALLONS! ! 
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      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 2 replies
      • 149 views
    • Anyone use Blue Yonder CC processing- $65 month no other charges

      Just got an email about Blue Yonder CC processing that sounds too good to be true. They say they only charge is $65 a month no start up fees, no transaction fees, no equipment fees, no hidden fees and no cancellation fees. It says it is compliant in all 50 states. Very tempting to try but I have been burned in the past. They are focusing on Auto Shop owners. Wondering what everyone else thinks about this. We would save over 10K a year.   Here is the website from my email: http://autorepairblueyonder.com/    

      By MINI4U, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 24 replies
      • 2,354 views
    • 2017 GM 3.6 oil filter issue causing internal engine damage

      The following are posts I made on the AOCA website outlining an issue(potential nightmare) we had on 2017 Chevrolet Colorado:   Randy_Lucyk
      Joined: Dec 21, 2011
      Total Posts: 83  Feb 8, 2018 3:03 PM Unfortunately, I believe this is exactly what this may turn into for shops and consumers. We recently had a report of an oil filter failure on a 2017 Chevrolet Colorado with 13304 miles on the truck and the issue occurred 400 miles after our oil change. Customer had a check engine light come on so he headed right off to the dealer to have it checked under warranty. It had a VVT code stored and the dealer started looking into the issue. They found the filter failure and sent a picture of the image off to the customer. We used a Performax P0171 filter. The customer sent me the attached image of the obviously failed filter. I am immediately highly concerned, but the dealer is being unusually understanding of the failure. We spend some time with the service manager and find out that their appears to be an issue starting to show up on these vehicles, where the stand pipe in the filter housing is coming off with the old filter and being disposed of without the techs knowledge. We had great video of the oil change and their was nothing visible with the old filter as it was removed. The premises is that without the standpipes restricting/diverting functionality in place, full oil flow is blowing out the filter and the everything flows right down the filter housing port into the cylinder heads and remainder of the motor and plugs up components and passages. We asked for a picture of the filter housing and received image 2 attached. This appears that it may be a problem starting in 17 model year, but i can't be sure of that yet. I am digging for additional info now and will update as more information becomes available.  Randy_Lucyk
      Joined: Dec 21, 2011
      Total Posts: 83  Feb 9, 2018 7:59 AM This appears to be both a GM issue and a in-shop issue. 

      Now that I see the notification GM released last week, i believe this issue occurred at the original oil change prior to the one we did. As I said, we had great video of the open end of the old filter as we removed it from the vehicle and I don't believe this stand pipe could have possibly been inside. Their is also no evidence of the tech struggling with anything "down in there" other then the normal A/C line interference issue. . 

      Looking at the design and the A/C line interference, I suspect that the stand pipe is being knocked loose as the filter is being "angled" around the A/C lines to get the old one out. I suspect the oring on the stand pipe is the only thing holding it in the oil filter housing. Once the standpipe is disposed of, the housing has to be replaced, as the stand pipe is not available separately. The housings are in short supply with only three left in the country on dealers shelves and none in Gm distribution centers. Their is a new part number for the housing and those are not available yet. Original pt# 12675707 and new pt# 12682014. 

      Looking at the attached illustrations and notice, it would not be easy to completely miss the fact that a problem was evident. The stand pipe looks too big to me to be easily missed. I suspect it is plastic and the words "housing cracked" was mentioned in the conversation with the service manager. I wonder if the stand pipe is actually cracking during removal of the filter, making it difficult/impossible to reinstall. If we did not do it, then why the old filter had not failed yet ours did, comes into question. Cold weather "full oil flow" was also mentioned in the conversation with the service manager, and those were the conditions at the time of the failure. 

      The images also create some questions for me. The new housing does not appear to be identical to the OE installed housing, so is it an already redesigned housing? The filter bulletin in the Napa/Wix box talks about an update to the filter to include a check valve in the top of the filter. Our old filter does not appear to have this check valve, the Napa/Wix does and our new stock P0171 filters also have it. Looking at the design of the stand pipe in the new housing, it would almost appear that the small nipple on the end of the stand pipe might make more sense if it fit into the open hole of the old filter. The stand pipe design almost seems wrong for the filter with the check valve, unless it is shorter than it looks and never reaches the upper end of the filter. Would be great if the next shop to have one of these off would post some additional pics to try and help reduce confusion. 

      Based on the notice from Gm, this does indeed look like it could get ugly. Although, this dealer covered all the extensive engine repairs under warranty(heads pulled, all new timing components, cleaning passages), i am not convinced all dealers will take that approach. In my case, it was nice(incredible?) to see GM step up and take responsibility. It helped that my customer (owner of the Colorado) retired from a GM primary supplier dealing with issues exactly like this for the later half of his career. He knew the right people to call to get the info needed to drill down to the root cause. 


      Randy Lucyk 
      Midas Kalkaska

      By rpllib, in Technician Corner - Discussions

      • 0 replies
      • 677 views
    • 2017 SUCCESS THREAD - Little disciplines makes great success.

      Happy New 2017!   I hope you have set your goals for 2017, if not, get working on them!   Every day take a step into achieving your goal, it is the simple positive habits that will make success show up at your door.   For example, if you wish more sales, choose to make 10 calls everyday, or send 10 letters or post cards. by the end of the week you will have achieved 50 calls or leads, your sells will soon show up.   Simple disciplines to success!   I begin by sharing with you a video of a presentation that has given me great happiness and success:  

      By HarrytheCarGeek, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 57 replies
      • 3,564 views
    • Article: OHS - Open Heart Surgery - My Story ----- A look at my summer of 2017

      OHS – Open Heart Surgery – My story “Being a mechanic, shop owner, writer, lecturer, and teacher I tend to ‘think’ I’m capable of answering any question, take on any challenge, and solve any problem that comes my way.  This… is one time, I wasn’t able to do so.”  Gonzo How it all started          Leading up to my zipper (which is slang for open heart surgery) I thought I was just getting old and tired.  For two years or so, I had a very slight off and on chest pain that didn’t last longer than a few minutes.  It hurt, but I wasn’t concerned.  As soon as the pain dissipated I forgot all about it.  Most of the time I would have months between incidences, but that gradually changed to an all-out crushing pressure that lingered longer and longer between no pain and intense pain. The increasing occurrences went from once in a while, to once a month, to too often to consider it something other than what it was… a heart attack.    Things that I used to do in a few minutes seemed to take hours. I’ve always been a hands on and very physical type of guy.  Never one to pass on heavy lifting or something that was physically demanding, but this “slowing down” stuff was just the something that you couldn’t ignore.  It was time to see a doctor.  An appointment was made, but as usual the pain subsided and I was busy at the shop, so on I went back at it as hard as I normally went at it. Thinking as usual, that I was as tough as a grizzly and could solve this like any other problem I’ve encountered.          There were a lot of signs leading up to my eventual heart attacks, (yes plural…as in several), but as with most boldly-go-where-no-man-has-gone-pig headed “A” personality-types with the personal drive of a MAC truck, and someone who still thinks he can keep up with the twenty something crowd (speaking of myself, of course) – and one who doesn’t listen to their own body or loved ones about your own demise, I ignored the signs. You fall into the trap of misdiagnosing yourself and possibly ending your career and family life all in one fatal swoop. If that’s you, then you’re bound to end up on the floor in the fetal position clutching your chest in extreme agony.  (Been there…done that). The ER          So, it’s no surprise I ended up in the ER with my son trying to carry his old man through the doors, while my wife is frantically making hand gestures seeking help from the nursing staff.  It wasn’t long before I was zipped (Gotta love that word, ya know) off into an awaiting curtained off room.  A few quick tests confirmed that this old guy wasn’t heading home any time soon.  Even the doctor who first examined me was in shock.  He said, “Most everyone I see this bad off are downstairs … with the sheet over their face … if ya get my drift.”  He went as far as pulling up the blanket and resting his arm alongside of my leg to show the color differences.  Wow, now I’m shocked.          All of this led to more tests, and more tests. By now all of my kids have flown into town to be at my side. Stents were tried, but that didn’t work.  All that did was give me a few jolts with the paddles and a few burn marks to show for their efforts.  (Nice mementos don’t ya think.) Anyway, this all led to even more tests and a trip to another hospital to be put on the schedule for my eventual zipper club initiation ceremony. In other words, an open heart surgery. The first encounter with reality After my ride in the ambulance on my first day at the “new” hospital I was sitting there in my room, in between one monitoring device and another with my two grown daughters holding each hand, I started to feel something wasn’t right.  I’m still a bit groggy from the stent debacle from the last hospital, but I could tell the medication was wearing off.  Just then, another massive heart attack decided to invite itself.  My only thought was… “Don’t you die with both your daughters holding your hands, ya old fart… pull yourself together!”  The wife was already out of the room looking for the nurse.  The nurse, quite calmly hit the code button, and methodically, as to not bring on any more chaos from the scene which was already happening, carried in a nitro pill for me.  In just a few seconds the pill dissolved under my tongue and I could feel the pain and pressure lifting away. Waiting on surgery day          A few days passed, I’ve been poked and prodded, medicated and subdued by so many different IV’s and pills that I’m feeling like a new guy already.  Even though the actual surgery is still days away. Friends and family called or stopped by on a regular basis.  Physically, you can deal with this, emotionally, I don’t know how to put it all into words.  At best, all I can say is that nearly everything you do, hear, or read about has a higher emotional connotation than ever before.  You’ll have no idea how much your emotional state is brought to the surface while going through all of this.  I’ve never been one to cry at the drop of a tissue, but I found myself in these uncontrollable moments over some of the silliest things.  I was later told it’s the medication, then I was told… it’s your heart speaking out, I’m not sure what it is… but it certainly is a change from the norm.  (For anyone who has been through this you know exactly what I mean) Big John          The night before the actual operation my usual nursing staff was in for a bit of a change.  The typical female nurse was replaced with BIG John.  Oh yes, I mean big too.  6’5” and towering over everyone and anything.  His job was to get me prepped for the operation.  Now, I’m not a little guy myself.  I’m no 6’5” but I’m not a frail little guy by any means.  Big John comes into my room carrying several items.  First there was the bacterial wash.  “Use this entire bottle and don’t miss a spot,” John tells me.  Then, there were these two pill cups.  John presses the cups in my direction.  “OK, these you take orally, and this one goes knuckle deep, and I’ve got to make sure you’ve done both.”  The realization of why “Big John” was here on this special occasion has become apparent. If I don’t get this done myself… I’m pretty sure he will. Obviously, modesty has left the building quite some time ago, so it wasn’t a stretch to be in the same room with this mammoth individual while I made the knuckle deep insertion.  Although, he wasn’t present for the eventual outcome he was well aware of the results.  I don’t know what they put in those, but a toilet seat belt and ceiling padding would have been appropriate. The CABG          The surgery itself (as I was told, because even though I was there…what the heck could I tell you about it) had a few difficulties, but as if it’s not noticeable by now I made it through with my heart beat intact.  The surgeon performs an operation called a CABG (Coronary Artery Bypass Graft). Mine was a double, meaning two grafts were made. One graft was taken from the left side of the chest and one was taken from behind the left knee. A heart pump is used during the operation to ensure a steady flow while the heart is being worked on. Believe me, you (the patient) have no idea what is going on until you’re told later on.  Hopefully, when the medication wears off and you’re coherent.  For me, the wife had to retell and retell the whole thing to me, because I wasn’t comprehending much of anything for quite some time. The ICU The ICU (Intensive care unit) is a whole new experience.  The first thing is the introduction prior to the surgery.  I was wheeled into the adjacent room to the operating room where I would be monitored and was told what to expect when I first woke up from the surgery.  The big thing the nurse kept stressing was that I would feel some discomfort from the breathing tube and not to make any attempts to pull it out.  Besides I would be strapped down to the table for my own safety.  I remember waking up and hearing the nurses talking to each other, “He’s coming to, be ready.”  “OK sir, don’t pull it out…Don’t pull it out!”  I realized where and what was going on and understood her commands. To me it was just seconds ago that she had told me to not try to pull out the breathing tube, but in reality it was about five or six hours later.  However, the “minor discomfort” was over shadowed by the fact you’re trying to breathe through a drinking straw.  That I wasn’t expecting at all.  Yea, Uhm Ms. Nurse… you forgot to mention that part.  My night nurse for ICU was the most anal retentive-OCD person I’ve ever met.  The guy spent every waking hour neatly aligning all of the monitors, bottles, tubes, and me over and over again as if we were about to have the commanding general stop by for an inspection.  Although, when the day came for me to be wheeled back into a regular room a new nurse was assigned the task. My OCD nurse was sent off to another patients ICU room to straighten up their hoses and IV units. The new nurse on the other hand, starting grabbing monitors, IV’s and whatever else needed to go, or that was still attached, and flung them on or around me while I was seated in an oversized recliner.  At one point she said to me as monitors were being tossed about, “Hold this…and this… and this.” and before long I’m being wheeled down the hallway at record setting speeds, as if it’s the Indy 500, only slowing down to make the corners or to change elevators. The overhead florescent lights were moving by so fast I thought they were camera flashes. I’m not sure the reason for the mad dash down the hallways, but it sure was the quickest sprint I’ve ever been on in a recliner race. Sleeping in at the hospital          Not that I hate hospitals, OK… I’m not their no#1 fan, but a hospital is not the place to get any sleep.  It seemed at exactly 5 minutes past the hour-every hour-day or night somebody was going to come into the room.  7 o’clock was the worst. That was shift change and it never failed that somebody didn’t tell somebody about what somebody was to do or not do, which meant even more trips in and out of the room. I learned very quickly that the best way to avoid the ever present knock on the door was to just leave the door open….at least that way they didn’t knock, and if you were just about to doze off you might actually catch a bit of shut eye before the next round of visitors, and if you’re really lucky you could avoid the guy coming in to check the serial number on the IV for the UPTEENTH time.   It was always the same guy at least twice a day from the inventory department.  I told him, “Dude, look around, I’m stuck in this room with this IV monitor and I assure you if anybody comes in here and steals it, replaces it with one that looks just like it, I guarantee I’ll call you and let you know. With all these interruptions I’m awake 24-7 which means me and this IV have become the best of friends. I’m dammed sure this is the same IV unit that was here yesterday! So why in the world do you need to come in and scan the serial number twice a day?!”  I don’t think I came off as his next best pal by a long shot. Eventually, the day came to get out of the hospital.  One the happiest days of my new life. Me and my IV had to part ways, and no, I didn’t tell the inventory guy. Home at last          When you finally get to be home, start your rehab schedule, and try to reassemble your now broken apart life, you begin to reevaluate what is most important for your future. Walking is your foremost concern. I had a routine I would do and set a goal each day a bit farther than the previous day.  Oh, I’d push it too far, and the wife or my son would have to come haul the emotionally incoherent old guy off of our hilly driveway more than once. It does get better, but it does take time.           You soon learn new routines, things like coughing and sneezing should only be done if your heart pillow or Teddy bear are close by.  Squeezing the pillow (or bear) against your chest prevents you from popping your sternum open. You also learn how to stand up and roll over without using your upper body as much as you previously did. Sleeping in a bed is out, at least for a month or so (if not longer) you’ll have to learn how to be comfortable in a recliner 24-7. Breathing, talking, walking, and bathing, etc… all their problems that you’ll need to overcome. And, probably the most important thing or the most annoying... (Your interpretation may vary) is the now-and-for-ever-more medications you’ll be on. Family and friends take precedence over work and bills.  The realization that life is all about a beginning and an end and that you’ve been given a chance to change your life’s conclusion differently than what it could have been.  Not that you need a lightning bolt to drop out of the sky to tell you to change your life…but a heart attack and open heart surgery is close enough to the same thing. So heed the warning, do yourself a favor. Except it for what it is, and discover what is more important.  Not a lot of people get this second chance. For some, it’s as sudden and as unexpected as a car crash. I feel there’s reason for every action and reaction.  It’s how you cope and/or do with those actions and reactions that make a difference.   Putting it all into perspective           Life is what you make of it.  There is no perfect solution, there is no golden key, it’s up to you to make it a difference. It’s not money or fame… just you.  As we’ve all heard before, “If you don’t have your health, you don’t have much at all.” True to some extent, but not always true and not always is your health something that you can have the way you’d like it to be. What is possible is living life to the fullest no matter what the odds.  I for one, love to hear stories of people who have found out they have some sort of rare disease and decided to fill their bucket list of personal accomplishments until their time has expired. I commend them and hope I can do the same. So even though my stamina and strength may not be equal to what it was of years past, I’m still able to experience all there is out there. For me, I’d like to think I still can try. Maybe it’s not all about the challenges, maybe it’s not all about solutions, perhaps it’s just about the adventure.  Becoming a member of the Zipper Club isn’t the end… it’s a new beginning.             
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      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 4 replies
      • 329 views
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