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lakesidetire

Cheap oil changes ( should I keep doing it )

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My shop was started in 1989 be my grandfather. His oil changes were $18.95 and I was that when he past away in 1999. I opened the shop back up April of 2000 and kept that price through the years all the way up to now. The shop has been known for the cheap oil changes. Should I keep offering them or bump the price up to like $24.95 or something different? It brings in cars that I can inspect and possibly get more work from but I just don't want to get the bottom feeders that won't spend any money on needed repairs.

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