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I don't know about your state but here in Rhode Island we are struggling for Auto Techs. Every dealer is looking for qualified techs. This makes it even more difficult for smaller shops like mine to find qualified people. It seems that every applicant I get is either in between binges or a felon.

I am not at the level yet to offer medical, dental or 401k. I am willing to offer top dollar to the right person.

 

Does anyone have a classified ad they use that works well or some input to help me find a good tech?

 

 

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Tool truck guys seem to be a reliable source of information on techs... They know who skips out on tool payments, who got fired for what reason, etc. They talk to disgruntled techs at other shops and might know someone who needs a new job and is worthy of hiring.

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We've had some luck with Indeed.com. If you type automotive technician jobs in your specific city with zip code in Google search, the first website that comes up is Indeed. It is a pay site so you will have to pay but we have gotten a pretty good turn out based on our ads that run on that site.

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You've gotten some great suggestions already in this thread.

I've found that if you read some of the ads on http://www.indeed.com,
for example, especially by the big companies, you can get some ideas
for wording your ad.

Use common sense. Obviously, you would not use their ad word for word,
but you can use it as a template.

One of the key things to put in the ad is: "You're hiring because
you're growing!" Otherwise, people will be wondering in the back
of their mind... "why the other guy quit." Even if that's not the
case, it's more exciting - to the right person - if there is an
open position "because you're growing."

You can use craigslist. Depending on the area, you may get a
higher caliber applicant if you go through indeed.com, monster.com
careerbuilder.com. I also vote for the local VoTech and trade schools.

Now, let's talk "Positioning". In other words...
The ad is just part of the equation. How you interview is the other
important part. Meaning... the ad is meant to get them in for
the interview. What happens in the interview is critical.

Some common mistakes are: trying to sell the applicant on why they
should work for you. This makes you seem needy and possibly even
desperate. That's going to start the relationship off on the wrong foot.

What you want to do is have a list of questions that are important
to you... outside of their experience and qualifications.

These questions need to be delivered one at a time, in a neutral,
conversational manner - not like you're a police officer, doing an
interrogation. You're more like Colombo, coming from a place

of curiosity. Because let's face it... you are curious about all

of these things.

What made them get into auto repair, to begin with?

What do they like about working on cars?
What don't they like about it?

What was it about the ad that caught your attention?

What do they like about working where they are currently working?
What don't they like about working where they are currently working?

Why are they looking to make a change?

What are they looking for in the next place they work?

What is their greatest strength?

What is their greatest weakness?

Why do you want to work here?

What is their current pay plan? What do they like about it?
What don't they like about it?

What was the last training you attended? What was the biggest
thing you learned that made a difference at your job?

These are just some examples, but what you are looking for
as you listen to the responses is:

What are the reasons I SHOULDN'T hire this person?

This is opposite of what bosses are usually thinking when they
are looking to hire people. And it makes all the difference
in the world.

You would rather find out NOW, in the interview... what his/her
quirks are. We all have them... it just matters if the ones he/she

has are deal breakers.

Plus as you're having this conversation with them, you're making
them WANT to work there, as opposed to you SELLING them on working there.

As much as you really, really need someone because of your new plans
for 2015... you do not want the applicants to KNOW you need them.

PS Only if you really like the person, do you tell them much

about the job, your culture, your philosophy, how you pay, etc.
Otherwise, it's pointless and a waste of everyone's time.

You can say to them...
"I really appreciate you coming in. I have other interviews. I'll get
back to you if I want you to come in for a second interview."

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Great tip, thanks!

 

I ask "have you ever spent time in prison" it breaks the ice with the younger guys, except one applicant responded "who hasn't?" Oh! He didn't have the required experience for a second interview. I might advise you guys to familiarize yourselves with your state labor laws. Denying employment may be considered discrimination so be very careful with your wording.

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You know , I find it very funny how you all can't find a good tech.

When I was looking for a job. I could not find a shop that did't want a slave.

Even working for Mercedes, it was the same story. You must give and maybe we will pay you what we think is right but still less than what you deserve..

In the end and with having no other choice I opened my own shop just a block away from the same Mercedes dealer I worked for.

Never looked back on that decision.

 

So maybe you all should look at your selfs first and then maybe you will realize why no one wants to work for you.

 

Gene.

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By "Slave" did you mean that I expect too much when I need a tech to produce 40 hours work for 40 hours pay?

Do I expect too much when I need them to come to work on time?

Maybe they are a slave because I don't allow them to steal my stuff.

 

Maybe you are the guy that gets mad when I say: "If you have time to lean, then you have time to clean".

 

My last tech produced 33%. Not hours but %. Out of every 10 hours on the clock he produced 3.3 billable hours.

 

This has all changed for me on January 1st. I now pay my techs between 15 and 18%. It is their fair share, It has released me from the baby sitting part of my duties.

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The techs we see apply reflect how the world is. Drugs,divorce,drinking,porn, the list goes. When i answer the phone at my shop i could honestly say " Auto repair and rehab, can i help you" That being said, Hire the cleanest living person with a good attitude,train skills and charge as much as you can so you can pay them well.

Edited by FROGFINDER
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You know , I find it very funny how you all can't find a good tech.

When I was looking for a job. I could not find a shop that did't want a slave.

Even working for Mercedes, it was the same story. You must give and maybe we will pay you what we think is right but still less than what you deserve..

In the end and with having no other choice I opened my own shop just a block away from the same Mercedes dealer I worked for.

Never looked back on that decision.

 

So maybe you all should look at your selfs first and then maybe you will realize why no one wants to work for you.

 

Gene.

But you're so polite and humble!

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I didn't expect any one to like my answer. Truth hurts and most people can't take the truth.

Paying your techs 15% to 18% is a joke. The fair pay is 33% of labor.

If you treat your tech with respect and fairness, they will come on time to work and they will clean up after them self.

As far as getting guys that can do 40 hrs in 40 hrs. When you offer crap, you get crap and you end up with crap.

The rules are that easy.

I had former employers give me crap because I failed to say HI to their fat wives, when they came in to the shop. Maybe because I was trying to solve an electrical problem

that three other shops could not. Maybe because I had no Idea that kissing your fat wives ass is part of the job requirement. I had employers give me crap because I had a cell phone and others didn't (that was years ego when cell phones were rare). Employers gave me crap because I drove a Mercedes and they didn't.

The list goes on and on.

The fact that I was 200% on average was not that important. It was all about I must kiss ass and bend over.

Deep down inside you all know what I am talking about. Whether or not you can admit it is whole different story. That takes strength and from some of your answers I can

see that most of you are weak.

In the end if you are going to reply to what I have written , just write if you agree or disagree, I will respect that. As far whining is concerned, save it for your wives.

You all have a nice day.

Gene.

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3rd post in and already hostile :rolleyes:

 

Gene pardon me but you sound like a very disgruntled person that had a lot of bad experiences in your career. That is really unfortunate and I am sorry to hear how your past employers treated you. You seem to also have started your business due to "entrepreneurial seizure" which you can read all about in Michael Gerber's book "The E-Myth".

 

I suggest before you go bashing other shop owners and pass judgement upon people whom you have never met and know little more than some text on this thread that you should think about what your purpose on this site is. We are here to help each other in a positive and constructive manner. Completely opposite from your posts. I hope you can take your own advice and reevaluate yourself and hopefully come back as a productive member of our little forum. Thanks!

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You know the whole time I was reading Gene's (or whoever) post I felt bad for him. To have such a talent but yet be so disgruntled. What a tortured soul. I hope some force reaches out and touches you Gene. Life is way too short to be so angry and bitter.

 

I too doubt you have a shop. No one with your attitude can possibly run a productive shop.

 

I am un-following this thread. Too negative for me.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I should have. Probably be making more money than I do now. Plus benefits.

I wish I could go back in time and kick my self in the ass.

Gene.

 

 

I guess every person on this forum, all the shop owners and techs out there that keep this country running are a bunch of idiots then. :rolleyes: You remind me of the old hag in Princess Buttercup's dream. Gene the heckler, "booooooo! boohoo!"

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You know , I find it very funny how you all can't find a good tech.

When I was looking for a job. I could not find a shop that did't want a slave.

Even working for Mercedes, it was the same story. You must give and maybe we will pay you what we think is right but still less than what you deserve..

In the end and with having no other choice I opened my own shop just a block away from the same Mercedes dealer I worked for.

Never looked back on that decision.

 

So maybe you all should look at your selfs first and then maybe you will realize why no one wants to work for you.

 

Gene.

As much as it hurts i know were Gene is coming from. Many of us were mechanics before we became shop owners/managers and we know what the public thinks of us. In the working world there is You, Me ,Us and THEM!

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As much as it hurts i know were Gene is coming from. Many of us were mechanics before we became shop owners/managers and we know what the public thinks of us. In the working world there is You, Me ,Us and THEM!

 

 

Frog, its not so much the jaded attitude we are all annoyed over. Its more about how insulting this character is as well as literally adding nothing of value to this forum. I consider myself a very open minded person. I recognize things that work for me may not work for someone else and vice versa however I do see merit in differing philosophies. I've forged some good friends on this forum and really do consider this forum to be a valuable asset to me and the shop owner community at large. I learn a lot on here and there are a ton of very smart guys willing to share their knowledge. I can say with all honesty this Gene character as of now is a detriment to this community and to put it plainly, talks out of his ass. I think its particularly damaging to the uninitiated shop owner that might see what he is posting as a possible right point of view. It is absolutely not and I don't think its something that should be tolerated on here. I apologizing for acting as the ASO police it is certainly not my intention. I guess its the NYer in my that has to say something when something needs to be said.

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Frog, its not so much the jaded attitude we are all annoyed over. Its more about how insulting this character is as well as literally adding nothing of value to this forum. I consider myself a very open minded person. I recognize things that work for me may not work for someone else and vice versa however I do see merit in differing philosophies. I've forged some good friends on this forum and really do consider this forum to be a valuable asset to me and the shop owner community at large. I learn a lot on here and there are a ton of very smart guys willing to share their knowledge. I can say with all honesty this Gene character as of now is a detriment to this community and to put it plainly, talks out of his ass. I think its particularly damaging to the uninitiated shop owner that might see what he is posting as a possible right point of view. It is absolutely not and I don't think its something that should be tolerated on here. I apologizing for acting as the ASO police it is certainly not my intention. I guess its the NYer in my that has to say something when something needs to be said.

[/q

 

 

Our enemy is not of flesh but is a spirit. Some of my best customers over 40 plus years started out as a detriment to my community and cursed me to my face over the costs of auto service. I kept listening and answering with a soft voice. I encouraged them, visited them in the hospital, held them as they were dying and went to their funerals. People that talk out of their ass tought me more than a college degree and pay my salary.

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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