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There is so many factors that go into selecting the "right" business for "me"

I have searched on the site and could not find a definitive (or close to) answer to my question.

 

Maybe someone has general formula for evaluating the business.

 

For example:

 

If the business does ~ $$$$$k gross a year and the parts mark up is %%

then the net should be $$$$$, the car count should be ### with ARO $$$, and the brake-even should be $$$

 

If the actual shop deviates from the formula a %% it's a go/no-go or re-evaluate.

 

I realize this is overly simplified, but at least it gives me idea what to look for when evaluating.

 

Thank you,

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