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Parts category pricing strategy??


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OK. Not to start another parts markup thread but I would like to look at this from another angle. What percentages do you aim when marking up parts when you look at the part categories? 

Just an example below:

Brakes 70%

Struts 30%

Shocks 50%

Tires 15-30%

Maintenance, etc ,etc

 

The reason I ask is because even a standard parts pricing matrix can blow certain items out of reasonable sale price. I am aware that less expensive items can net larger profits, which also makes up for more expensive items but I am trying to see a base line of what parts markup looks like with these categories.

Thanks

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