Quantcast
Jump to content


5 Star Auto Spa

When/if To Charge For Diagnostic Charge?!

Recommended Posts

Just wanted to get a better feel for other shop owners and how they handle charging for diagnostic work. We classify diagnostic work as anything that the customer comes in to have fixed but does not know what parts need to be replaced. Do you all usually charge a diagnostic fee and then charge a parts and labor fee after you find out what the problem is or do you roll the diagnostic charge into the labor to replace the part if the customer has the work performed at your shop? What do you all classify as diagnostic and what are your charges? We currently have diagnostic charges for under car/under hood starting at $40 or 1/2 hour and electrical/computer diagnostic starting at $80 or 1 hour. Some feedback would be greatly appreciated!

 

Would you have a diagnostic charge for the following or just the 1.2 hours of labor and parts required to replace the alternator:

 

Customer comes in and states that there was a large popping noise heard this morning and now she hears a constant smaller popping noise. Our tech figures out that it is the coupler attached to the alternator. He performs an alternator test to verify that the alternator does in fact work properly. The CSA presents this information to the customer and he chooses to replace the entire alternator versus just the coupler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To continue reading responses, you must be signed in.

Edited by Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Forum Topics

    • Customer's buying their own parts

      Hey guys. I'm new to the forum and was looking for this subject but couldn't find it. Sorry If I'm posted something that's already been discussed. I own a brake shop in Austin, TX. We do anywhere from 10-20 brake jobs a day. We only do brakes so I don't know how much full service auto shops deal with this problem but... Customers are constantly calling in claiming they've bought the best parts or they want to provide their own parts because they've done research and know what is best. This drives me crazy. First of all they don't know whats best. Then after being told no they get offended and act like tons of shops allow this. What is the best way to handle these customers? Just send them away? I'll quote them a price using our parts and they act as though its a rip off. What shops are doing this for their customers? I feel like I'm letting jobs get away from me. Any experience with this?

      By Jonathan Ganther, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 78 replies
      • 3,749 views
    • Do you guarantee results from your diagnostic time?

      I think we all know that diagnostics is the most costly service we provide in the automotive repair business today. In today's automotive repair environment, you need to be selling diagnostics, and getting paid for it. I'm looking for feedback on when things don't go exactly as planned.  Let's say a car comes in and you sell some diagnostics, by the hour, or from a menu. After you complete that work, and you still don't have an answer, do you go back to the customer and sell some more? Do you continue at your expense? If you do go back to the customer, and you have nothing conclusive after that, then what? Do you keep going back and selling more diagnostic work until you solve the problem? If you continue to go back and sell more, how many times can you do that? We've all had that car that we've worked on for weeks to find some strange problem. I doubt many customers are willing to pay for the 40 hours you spent on the car. Now lets say after 5 hours of work that the customer agreed to, you are no closer to finding the issue than when the car came in. Do you charge them for the 5 hours and send them down the road even though you have not provided them with a diagnoses? Do you start spending your time trying to solve the issue because you have a hard time charging for 5 hours and are unable to provide any answers? I'm asking these questions as I am rethinking my business strategy on diagnostics a little. Our shop is known for its abilities to diagnose problems. We have other shops bringing cars to us on a regular basis because of these abilities. I actually get several calls and emails weekly from across the county for help diagnosing problems. There are times, a lot of times, when I think this is more of a curse, than a blessing. I know we are in the business of fixing cars, and we need to be able to find problems if customers are going to keep coming back. But after my lead tech and I spent a considerable amount of time over the last 15 days diagnosing the strangest intermittent no start issue on an Audi, and watching his frustration grow everyday, not because of the difficulty of the issue as we both love the challenge, but because it held him back from addressing the other work that was coming in the shop.  So, as rewarding as it was to solve that mystery, I can't help but look back at what it cost me financially, and the frustration to the technician, and realize we have to come up with a way to try to avoid going down those rabbit holes. Right now my idea is to give it 1 hour. If after an hour, we are not relatively certain that we will find the issue, with another hour or two, then let the car go. Let the customer know that it's not that we can't fix the car, but that we cannot fix it efficiently. If I lose that customer, it would probably still be cheaper that working on his car for 2 weeks. Love to hear your thoughts. Scott          

      By ScottSpec, in Auto Repair Shop Management Help? Post Here!

      • 9 replies
      • 491 views
    • Broken Parts

      Are you guys charging your techs for parts they break? In the past we have never made our techs pay for something they broke, the shop did and talked to the tech about what they need to do to prevent this in the future. It's getting old though. 2 weeks ago one young tech back a mirror into a pole so we bought a new mirror. This week, a different tech while removing a fuel tank, didn't discount the fuel lines on top first and ended up dropping the tank too fast and broke the fuel sending unit. On this truck that is a $300+ part that we are now eating on a $500 ticket. I want to tell the tech he is responsible, and will have to pay the shop back for the part. What say you? 

      By ADP, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 6 replies
      • 305 views
    • Parts ordering

      Does anyone else get frustrated sourcing parts from multiple vendors because of lack of comprehensive inventory from one supplier? I estimate we spend an extra hour sometimes per day trying to hunt down parts. We always start with our favorite vendor then start going down the list.   Just curious how you guys deal with this problem or if it in fact a problem? Thanks in advance, Scott

      By kbomb, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 6 replies
      • 667 views
    • Shop Owners: You don’t have to answer every question for your employees

      As shop owners, we sometimes feel that we need to answer every question and handle every situation. While you need to be proficient as a business owner, you also need your employees to think for themselves.  Empower your people to solve problem.  Ask them for their opinions and don’t be too quick to jump in on every situation.  The more you jump in and solve their problems, the more they will rely on you. This is not to say you don’t have their back; but a team functions best when everyone takes ownership of their position and takes responsibility to take care of problems. Will employees make mistakes? Yes.  But there isn’t a shop owner on this planet that has a perfect record at making decisions.  We all make mistakes. As a shop owner; teach, mentor and coach.  Include your employees in on decisions that relate to their job position.  When employees feel you trust them, they will begin to solve their own problems. This will set you free to work on the things that will bring you greater success.

      By Joe Marconi, in Joe’s Business Tips For Shop Owners

        
      • 2 replies
      • 330 views
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×