Quantcast
Jump to content


Short staffed


Recommended Posts

Hello Everyone,

We've been trying to find good help for the past 3 months and have been very unsuccessful. We have ads on craigslist and indeed and had no luck on there neither. Our workload is backed up and now it's starting to affect our profitability, in terms of we're taking 2 weeks to finish a week's worth of work. Anyone have any good suggestions on how to get out of this bind or is being patient our best bet?

 Thanks...Robert

Link to comment
Share on other sites



I'm sure nobody will like this answer but it works.  

You have to be active.  Posting ads is passive.  I actually had to go out online and find resumes and start calling guys.  I found a guy rather quickly.  It seems like lot of techs are upset with the politics of where they are, so if you can give them a pleasant place to work at, they will come and take a pay cut to do it.  

I also have job seekers show up on occasion so I always have them fill out an application and chat them up just in case I need someone in a pinch.  In February my lube tech quit abruptly (story for another day) and I had a new guy start the next day. ;) 

In fact, my lube tech who quit stopped by last week looking for his job back.  Apparently, his new place of employment isn't quite as pleasant to work at.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ok, but how?  what were the search terms?  what websites?  i mean, resumes have to sit on a server somewhere so im wondering where you are seeing them?

Where did you find this guy you hired?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you are not going to provide this invaluable way of finding a tech, WHY would you post it in the first place? 

 

OP, i have had the same issues as you, in the end craigslist has been the best in finding us a candidate.  The general service guys are easier to get and look at craigslist. The tech also go there but it does seem to be more difficult to find them.  I post to CL and indeed.

 

I also keep all past applications and resumes and go thru those and make phone calls, got one by doing that.  

 

Just wish we could get the magical search terms to find the golden hidden tech resumes.........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wasn't able to respond directly to some of the responses. Thank you to everyone who responded. I have been contacting people on indeed, just haven't found much luck. The staff that I have now, has just been by pure luck. I specialize in transmissions so that also makes it even harder. I have to try and find a general tech and try to train him up to become fast enough on transmissions. The staff I have now, let's just say this. If I didn't have them, or they didn't happen to stumble into my shop, I'd be in the red and digging myself out a hole. Thank you for everyone who responded. I guess there's no easy solution but to wait and do the best i can.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've tried indeed, monster, linkedin...none of these options provided us with great candidates.

I agree with Joe. It's all about networking. All of the applications we've received that were actually from worthy candidates were from (free) advertising that we were hiring on social media --FB and Instagram. But one thing to note is that we are extremely active on social media and in the local car community (go to /host a lot of events) so the applications were coming from people that knew about us already or knew someone who did.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I've been saved by the network. One of the reasons I wanted to post this was, I try to prepare myself for the  "what if didn't have that network scenario." I definitely have been in that situation and have been taken advantage of.  Thanks for putting the professional sports team analogy. I always try to picture myself like a sports franchise.😂 Thanks for the tip Meowpox, that's the avenue our shop has been investing more time on, especially the advertising side.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had a lot of success using word of mouth through the tool trucks, my vendors and the parts delivery drivers . Another way I had heard was to go to the new car dealers and hand your business cards out to the techs. If you go to ally of training seminars you could try there also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Andre R said:

 . Another way I had heard was to go to the new car dealers and hand your business cards out to the techs. If you go to ally of training seminars you could try there also.

ahhhh the golden rule. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

brilliant ideas there.....walk through another's service dept passing out business cards. I can't think of a better way to say "hi, I'm a slime ball" I wonder what kind of person you might attract.

And at training??? It's bad enough that shops arent sending their techs to training but to now have to worry about someone poaching them? I suspect you and your shop would build quite the reputation. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Andre R said:

I have had a lot of success using word of mouth through the tool trucks, my vendors and the parts delivery drivers . Another way I had heard was to go to the new car dealers and hand your business cards out to the techs. If you go to ally of training seminars you could try there also.

yikes, stay out of peoples shops man

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have tried career builder, indeed, craigslist, facebook and a few others. Craigslist and facebook are the best for leads. We are active with our facebook page so that helps and we do buy some advertising on Facebook. One of the things we were doing is as soon as we got a response from someone (mostly Craigslist) we would request they go to our website to fill out an online application. Rarely would someone do this. Since we don't hire a great deal of people, I really don't have much experience even though I have been in business over 15 years. I noticed my local Chick-fil-A was having open interviews one day so I called up the owner who is a friend and prefaced my question with "No is an acceptable answer". I then asked him if I could sit through an interview for some tips. He said he would do one better, he would come down, pick me up, provide me with lunch, give me a back end tour, and sit through as many interviews that I wanted. He then said he needed to make an appointment for service so I one upped him and told him bring your vehicle, drop it off and we will go in mine while they service yours. 

Anyway they don't require an application for an interview. he has 2 other staff people pre interview to weed out a number of the applicants and then he gets the ones that are pre-screened. He begins by telling them the process of the interview.

1. Introduces himself and me to the applicant.

2. Talks about himself and his background as the owner operator.

3. Talks about he organization

4. His style of management.

5. He then tells them to take about 5 minutes to tell him their story and asks them if its ok if he makes some notes on his phone while they talk. And lets them know he is not texting or answering emails but merely making notes about the interview. He also tells them that he or I might interrupt their story to ask them a few questions.  

6. If he feels compelled he then tells the that he has a position he thinks would be a great fit and tells them about the position. He makes them an offered with the stipulation that they must fill out an online application and screening and if that is ok then they have a job. He asks them if they can go online that day to complete the application process. If they can't do it that day he then asks if they can complete the next day. They all agree. If they don't complete the online part when they said they would then they don't hire them. 

After viewing the operations I could pretty much place each of the interview candidates in various positions and it was actually uplifting because he had some great young people.  

One of the other things he does is to put a couple of napkins on the floor by the table to see if anyone picks them up. 

A couple of things i learned is that they make it a very informal process and get the applicant comfortable. They build some excitement about the organization by telling their story so that the applicants want to come there.  I have changed our process and don't even mention the application now. We go ahead and schedule an interview. We get them to commit to a time and if they are late we will talk to them for a bit to find out what happened and give them a 5 minute shop tour but not much after that. If they're late for an interview then my experience is they lack discipline and are also late for work.  Once we give them a tour we tell them about our organization and vision. We try and get them excited and want to come work with us. We ask them to tell their story, ask them about their hopes and dreams. If we aren't really hiring we let them know we take our time in the hiring process and we are slow to hire. We have also shared our growth plans with them so sometimes is a matter of obtaining potential hires to have in the stable. Once we complete the initial interview we direct them to our website and tell them that our application is a little lengthy but we want to know as much about them as we can because we have an exceptional team and don't want to damage that by a bad hire.  We also do 2-3 interviews. The manager, the lead tech, and myself occasionally.  

A couple of points.

Make sure your shop and your office is clean and well lite. nobody really can get excited about working in a messy dungeon.

Treat everyone of them with respect. We also tell the applicants that they can also talk to any of the employees if they like. 

We treat all the parts delivery guys and all of our vendors with the highest regard. We offer delivery guys cold bottled water and sodas and create good repore with them as they can be advocates for your business. Our last great hire was a service writer referred to us by a major vendor.  One of the last top techs we hired came to us from a combination of parts house and tool truck recommendations. Guy was new to the area and talked to parts houses and tool truck guys and asked if they were looking for a job where are three places they would go. We were at the top of the list. I thought that was a smart and unique way for someone to find a place to work. This was an exceptional tech and we he came to us he was upfront and stated he would only be with us 2-3 yrs max as his wife was a DOD worker and would be transferred after this assignment so he wanted us to know that before hiring him. 

Even doing all this you will still make bad hires as we have also. We terminate those quickly. This hasn't always been the case as I am too nice and give 2nd, 3rd.... chances. My manager is much better at this than me. I have improved greatly over the years because this is extremely costly to morale and culture. 

Anyway I hope this helps and always be looking and interviewing. 

 

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Marksas said:

I have tried career builder, indeed, craigslist, facebook and a few others. Craigslist and facebook are the best for leads. We are active with our facebook page so that helps and we do buy some advertising on Facebook. One of the things we were doing is as soon as we got a response from someone (mostly Craigslist) we would request they go to our website to fill out an online application. Rarely would someone do this. Since we don't hire a great deal of people, I really don't have much experience even though I have been in business over 15 years. I noticed my local Chick-fil-A was having open interviews one day so I called up the owner who is a friend and prefaced my question with "No is an acceptable answer". I then asked him if I could sit through an interview for some tips. He said he would do one better, he would come down, pick me up, provide me with lunch, give me a back end tour, and sit through as many interviews that I wanted. He then said he needed to make an appointment for service so I one upped him and told him bring your vehicle, drop it off and we will go in mine while they service yours. 

Anyway they don't require an application for an interview. he has 2 other staff people pre interview to weed out a number of the applicants and then he gets the ones that are pre-screened. He begins by telling them the process of the interview.

1. Introduces himself and me to the applicant.

2. Talks about himself and his background as the owner operator.

3. Talks about he organization

4. His style of management.

5. He then tells them to take about 5 minutes to tell him their story and asks them if its ok if he makes some notes on his phone while they talk. And lets them know he is not texting or answering emails but merely making notes about the interview. He also tells them that he or I might interrupt their story to ask them a few questions.  

6. If he feels compelled he then tells the that he has a position he thinks would be a great fit and tells them about the position. He makes them an offered with the stipulation that they must fill out an online application and screening and if that is ok then they have a job. He asks them if they can go online that day to complete the application process. If they can't do it that day he then asks if they can complete the next day. They all agree. If they don't complete the online part when they said they would then they don't hire them. 

After viewing the operations I could pretty much place each of the interview candidates in various positions and it was actually uplifting because he had some great young people.  

One of the other things he does is to put a couple of napkins on the floor by the table to see if anyone picks them up. 

A couple of things i learned is that they make it a very informal process and get the applicant comfortable. They build some excitement about the organization by telling their story so that the applicants want to come there.  I have changed our process and don't even mention the application now. We go ahead and schedule an interview. We get them to commit to a time and if they are late we will talk to them for a bit to find out what happened and give them a 5 minute shop tour but not much after that. If they're late for an interview then my experience is they lack discipline and are also late for work.  Once we give them a tour we tell them about our organization and vision. We try and get them excited and want to come work with us. We ask them to tell their story, ask them about their hopes and dreams. If we aren't really hiring we let them know we take our time in the hiring process and we are slow to hire. We have also shared our growth plans with them so sometimes is a matter of obtaining potential hires to have in the stable. Once we complete the initial interview we direct them to our website and tell them that our application is a little lengthy but we want to know as much about them as we can because we have an exceptional team and don't want to damage that by a bad hire.  We also do 2-3 interviews. The manager, the lead tech, and myself occasionally.  

A couple of points.

Make sure your shop and your office is clean and well lite. nobody really can get excited about working in a messy dungeon.

Treat everyone of them with respect. We also tell the applicants that they can also talk to any of the employees if they like. 

We treat all the parts delivery guys and all of our vendors with the highest regard. We offer delivery guys cold bottled water and sodas and create good repore with them as they can be advocates for your business. Our last great hire was a service writer referred to us by a major vendor.  One of the last top techs we hired came to us from a combination of parts house and tool truck recommendations. Guy was new to the area and talked to parts houses and tool truck guys and asked if they were looking for a job where are three places they would go. We were at the top of the list. I thought that was a smart and unique way for someone to find a place to work. This was an exceptional tech and we he came to us he was upfront and stated he would only be with us 2-3 yrs max as his wife was a DOD worker and would be transferred after this assignment so he wanted us to know that before hiring him. 

Even doing all this you will still make bad hires as we have also. We terminate those quickly. This hasn't always been the case as I am too nice and give 2nd, 3rd.... chances. My manager is much better at this than me. I have improved greatly over the years because this is extremely costly to morale and culture. 

Anyway I hope this helps and always be looking and interviewing. 

 

 

 

wow, nice tips, very good. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Marksas said:

I have tried career builder, indeed, craigslist, facebook and a few others. Craigslist and facebook are the best for leads. We are active with our facebook page so that helps and we do buy some advertising on Facebook. One of the things we were doing is as soon as we got a response from someone (mostly Craigslist) we would request they go to our website to fill out an online application. Rarely would someone do this. Since we don't hire a great deal of people, I really don't have much experience even though I have been in business over 15 years. I noticed my local Chick-fil-A was having open interviews one day so I called up the owner who is a friend and prefaced my question with "No is an acceptable answer". I then asked him if I could sit through an interview for some tips. He said he would do one better, he would come down, pick me up, provide me with lunch, give me a back end tour, and sit through as many interviews that I wanted. He then said he needed to make an appointment for service so I one upped him and told him bring your vehicle, drop it off and we will go in mine while they service yours. 

Anyway they don't require an application for an interview. he has 2 other staff people pre interview to weed out a number of the applicants and then he gets the ones that are pre-screened. He begins by telling them the process of the interview.

1. Introduces himself and me to the applicant.

2. Talks about himself and his background as the owner operator.

3. Talks about he organization

4. His style of management.

5. He then tells them to take about 5 minutes to tell him their story and asks them if its ok if he makes some notes on his phone while they talk. And lets them know he is not texting or answering emails but merely making notes about the interview. He also tells them that he or I might interrupt their story to ask them a few questions.  

6. If he feels compelled he then tells the that he has a position he thinks would be a great fit and tells them about the position. He makes them an offered with the stipulation that they must fill out an online application and screening and if that is ok then they have a job. He asks them if they can go online that day to complete the application process. If they can't do it that day he then asks if they can complete the next day. They all agree. If they don't complete the online part when they said they would then they don't hire them. 

After viewing the operations I could pretty much place each of the interview candidates in various positions and it was actually uplifting because he had some great young people.  

One of the other things he does is to put a couple of napkins on the floor by the table to see if anyone picks them up. 

A couple of things i learned is that they make it a very informal process and get the applicant comfortable. They build some excitement about the organization by telling their story so that the applicants want to come there.  I have changed our process and don't even mention the application now. We go ahead and schedule an interview. We get them to commit to a time and if they are late we will talk to them for a bit to find out what happened and give them a 5 minute shop tour but not much after that. If they're late for an interview then my experience is they lack discipline and are also late for work.  Once we give them a tour we tell them about our organization and vision. We try and get them excited and want to come work with us. We ask them to tell their story, ask them about their hopes and dreams. If we aren't really hiring we let them know we take our time in the hiring process and we are slow to hire. We have also shared our growth plans with them so sometimes is a matter of obtaining potential hires to have in the stable. Once we complete the initial interview we direct them to our website and tell them that our application is a little lengthy but we want to know as much about them as we can because we have an exceptional team and don't want to damage that by a bad hire.  We also do 2-3 interviews. The manager, the lead tech, and myself occasionally.  

A couple of points.

Make sure your shop and your office is clean and well lite. nobody really can get excited about working in a messy dungeon.

Treat everyone of them with respect. We also tell the applicants that they can also talk to any of the employees if they like. 

We treat all the parts delivery guys and all of our vendors with the highest regard. We offer delivery guys cold bottled water and sodas and create good repore with them as they can be advocates for your business. Our last great hire was a service writer referred to us by a major vendor.  One of the last top techs we hired came to us from a combination of parts house and tool truck recommendations. Guy was new to the area and talked to parts houses and tool truck guys and asked if they were looking for a job where are three places they would go. We were at the top of the list. I thought that was a smart and unique way for someone to find a place to work. This was an exceptional tech and we he came to us he was upfront and stated he would only be with us 2-3 yrs max as his wife was a DOD worker and would be transferred after this assignment so he wanted us to know that before hiring him. 

Even doing all this you will still make bad hires as we have also. We terminate those quickly. This hasn't always been the case as I am too nice and give 2nd, 3rd.... chances. My manager is much better at this than me. I have improved greatly over the years because this is extremely costly to morale and culture. 

Anyway I hope this helps and always be looking and interviewing. 

 

 

 

Thank you! I think this will help everyone out tremendously. Chick-fil-A is a great organization and now I know why. I've heard they screen their franchisees very carefully. I like his interview process! Thank you for sharing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Autotech napaautotech.com
      Matt Fanslow discusses the importance of forming relationships with tool truck dealers. He emphasizes the benefits of sharing information and knowledge, highlighting the potential for mutual support and collaboration within the automotive industry. 
      Show Notes
      Interactions with Tool Dealers (00:01:08) Discussion on the visits by tool dealers and the challenges in communicating needs and preferences to them. Developing Relationships (00:02:15) Importance of developing relationships with tool dealers, outside salespeople, and distributors, emphasizing the need for networking and knowledge sharing. Challenges with Tool Offerings (00:03:37) Exploration of the limitations and challenges in the offerings of tool dealers, including the lack of awareness about alternative products. Quid Pro Quo in Information Sharing (00:05:03) Discussion on the concept of quid pro quo, where information sharing with tool dealers can lead to mutual benefits over time. Challenges Faced by Tool Dealers (00:06:14) Insight into the challenges faced by tool dealers in keeping up with product knowledge. Enhancing Relationships with Tool Dealers (00:13:04) Encouragement for forming strong relationships with tool dealers, emphasizing the mutual exchange of knowledge and support. Expanding Services and Product Offerings (00:16:01) Exploration of the potential for expanding services and product offerings, including high voltage gloves and technical tools, to support the evolving needs of automotive professionals. Symbiotic Relationship with Tool Dealers (00:17:19) Emphasis on the symbiotic relationship between automotive professionals and tool dealers, highlighting the mutual benefits of collaboration.  
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Autotech napaautotech.com
       
      Email Matt: [email protected]
      Diagnosing the Aftermarket A - Z YouTube Channel HERE
      Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/
       
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By nptrb

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By Changing The Industry
      Episode 169 - Is OE Software Our Only Option? With Ben Johnson of Repairify
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partners, AAPEX, NAPA TRACS, and Automotive Management Network Hear from the team at Mighty Auto Pro as they discuss the pivotal role of morning huddles and meetings. The team shares their experiences on how these gatherings enhance daily workflow and help minimize unexpected challenges. Leigh Anne Best and Bill Hill, Mighty Auto Pro, Medina OH. Show Notes
      Skylar's Morning Huddle (00:04:14) Skylar explains the morning huddle and its role in coordinating service work and workflow. Michael's Morning Huddle (00:09:32) Michael emphasizes the importance of the morning huddle in ensuring everyone is on the same page and minimizing surprises during the day. Josh's Morning Huddle (00:09:55) Josh discusses how morning huddles help in managing parts and workflow, and the interaction between customer service and technicians. David's Morning Huddle (00:11:58) David explains the purpose of the morning huddle in coordinating projects and ensuring everyone is on the same page. Training Hours and Meetings (00:13:19) Discussion about the training hours completed, the process of introducing new training seminars, and the importance of training in the automotive industry. Brian's Morning Huddle (00:14:54) Brian discusses the value of morning huddles in providing uniformity, team collaboration, and adaptability in planning the day's work. Thanks to our Partners, AAPEX, NAPA TRACS, and Automotive Management Network Set your sights on Las Vegas in 2024. Mark your calendar now … November 5th-7th, 2024. AAPEX - Now more than ever. And don’t miss the next free AAPEX webinar. Register now at http://AAPEXSHOW.COM/WEBINAR NAPA TRACS will move your shop into the SMS fast lane with onsite training and six days a week of support and local representation. Find NAPA TRACS on the Web at http://napatracs.com/ Get ready to grow your business with the Automotive Management Network: Find on the Web at http://AftermarketManagementNetwork.com for information that can help you move your business ahead and for the free and informative http://LaborRateTracker.com Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections                    
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By jadetrost
      Hello guys I’m Jade Trost 56 years. New  on this forum 


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...