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brian lorenzo

Renting From The Competition

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I have an opportunity to rent a 3rd location in a fairly busy area with a lot of potential. Problem is the current shop that is there owns the building and is moving 3 1/2 miles down the road will be the land lord. 


Is this a good idea? anyone else have this situation?

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