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Elon Block

Are you in the AAA certified shop program?

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,

In case you hadn't heard, here's something you need to be aware of...

AAA is making some changes, in the way they are doing business.

Within the last few years, AAA has decided to build their own company-owned facilities.

Here is a link, with an example of search results, drivers will see when they type in a zip code:
http://bit.ly/2bk7prG

Pay special attention to the search results marked (AAA Owned Facility).

The facilities are impressive and are gaining traction:
http://midatlantic.aaa.com/Automotive/ClubOwnedRepair/Aboutus/New

As you can see, their slogan is, "Auto Repair From A Name You Trust".

This is genius marketing, on their part...

Because customers equate the AAA logo, as a shop they can trust.

The other major change they've made is...

The new requirements for the AAA certification renewal.

Many shop owners did not read the fine print or notice the changes to the agreement.

In other words, the fine print requires certified shops to give AAA access to the shop's customer database.

The biggest concern is if you give them access to your customer database and then, they open a AAA Owned Facility, in your backyard...

They now have a built-in customer base they can market to.

What that means to you is...

This a major conflict of interest because now, they have all of your customers' information, which they can use to actively market and essentially steal your customers.

So, this is something to be considered, in deciding to continue to be affiliated, as a AAA certified shop.

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