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UsedTireShop

How do I handle a AMEX charge back?

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Hello,

I received my first charge back today. Does anyone have experience with this?

 

The story:

Lady came in with a Volvo that ran poorly. We pulled the code and followed the diagnostic tree. The result was to replace the throttle body. I ordered a new throttle body from Volvo. After we installed this part the customer came in and used her AAA to tow it to a local foreign car specialist to have it programmed. We pick it up from the repair shop and brought it back to our shop so she could pick it up. 3 days later the car came back running poorly again. I called the shop that programmed it to see if they could add any tips. The technician then informed me that they use generic programming and the vehicle should be programmed by the dealer. I paid and towed it to a Volvo dealer. Next day we pick it up. After payment we went to the car and it wouldn't start. The Volvo tech came out and shook some wire and the car started. We drove it back to our shop and it was running poorly. I soon realized that I have no right or desire to mess with the God awful Volvo wiring. I paid once again to tow it to a different foreign car specialist. As of late last week the car was still there. Today I receive a pre charge back from AMEX for $1,230. I have until July 4th to send them my answer.

 

Any feedback would be appreciated.

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Edited by lmcca

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