Quantcast
Jump to content


Mavis $79.99 brake pads installed special


Recommended Posts



My local Honda Dealership claims 'Brakes Installed: $159.99'. This includes OEM brake pads, one axle, and anything else is extra. The fine print mentions hardware, rotors (serviced or replaced), and other items additional. Weak

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interest stuff coming up with Mavis STS,

 

http://newjersey.craigslist.org/aos/5546103065.html

 

 

favorite this post WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT STS (YOU MUST READ) hide this posting
© craigslist - Map data © OpenStreetMap

(google map)

 

STS Although a small chain was a reputable tire chain.
They were recently bought out by Mavis, a national chain
that has one goal, take your money.
Beware, they use bait and switch tactics, and scare tactics, especially on women,
they train their sales people to upsell everything.
The best thing you can do is switch to your local reliable auto repair shop for your
tires and repairs.
MAVIS HAS ONE GOAL TAKE YOUR MONEY!
Avoid doing business with Mavis!

 

http://newjersey.craigslist.org/aos/5573886398.html

 

http://newjersey.craigslist.org/aos/5535221793.html

 

http://newjersey.craigslist.org/aos/5495150877.html

 

etc...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any of you have seen this deal from Mavis?

 

http://imgur.com/l6g8PMB

 

http://www.mavistire.com/?kmas=1&kmca=91770970572-mavis-e-g&kmag=AN:MAV|PB:G|TT:SN|CD:Branded|GT:New_Jersey&kmkw=mavis&kmmt=e&gclid=CIa2mNnH6cwCFRRZhgod1-gFdQ

 

 

Talk about doing the desperate thing to bring people in through the door.

 

They have had that deal going for a long time - as in years. Not sure if it's just a "pad slap" or if they include resurfacing the rotors, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Nobody leaves there for $79.99 I guarantee

Yeah, we had a place here that advertised $99.95 lifetime guarantee installed. Rumor (more than just rumor) had it that nobody got out of there with less than pads, rotors and calipers if they wanted a warranty.

 

The guy came up from downstate and the tool guys down there called the tool guys up here and told them don't sell this guy anything on credit. He was there Friday @5:00 and not there Monday @8:00. Not even his (former) employees knew what had happened.

 

Locally he tried to get a parts store to bill him 10% over cost and then cut him (personally) a check for the 10% at the end of the month. That ways his COGS was higher so he could show a "lower profit" for paying his techs and for taxes. He has since moved on to a new town and new pool of suckers. Sad thing is for many of these cheap-price-chasers no matter how many times they get overcharged, cheated, poor quality repairs that cost more in the long run, they will never learn. They say you can't fix stupid. Well it seems more an more people are getting stupid than learning from their mistakes. Value is NOT a cheap price.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Had a new Store open here called "Just Brakes". Now with a name like that would you take your trcuk there for an A/C repair? Well had one last week did just that. Expidition not blowing cold. They tell the owner to go buy all his own parts at NAPA. They installed the compressor and told him to return the drier and valve. Well if you dont replace those components the warranty is void on the comprerssor. Owner was told they coludn't change the drier because the nuts were siezed to the evap. Compressor lasted 24 hours. Brings it in here. I check it, Sure enough the compressor is burned up. Checked the drier and guess what...flanged at the evap and spring lock at hose..no threaded fittings!! I gave them an est for repair and guess what...."I am broke..just brakes got all my money. Can you call NAPA and try to help me out" Well I cant and Heres your sign!

And you just know that to their friends it wasn't Just Brakes fault, it was junk that NAPA sold them and you wouldn't do anything to fix their problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

In response to "UsedTireShop", you posted "We have a regional chain store that often offer $99 brakes. We often place our sidewalk sign out and it reads...

We Fix $99 Brake Jobs!
I would suggest a small edit. Add (in big bold text) FINALLY... as shop that can...
Just a suggestion. Hope this helps
Matthew Lee
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good idea svauto! Good luck. You've got to stand out from the rest... and take a stand.

By the way... I notice my first post had a type-o... it should read...

 

FINALLY... a repair shop that FIXES $99 Brake Jobs!

 

And don't forget to put a BIG ARROW on the sign pointing people. Signs with arrows generate a better response.

 

Hope this helps!

Matthew Lee

"The Car Count Fixer"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...
  • 5 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

Our biggest local Toyota dealer has a brake service on most cars, light trucks that includes new OE rotors, pads, labor for $199.  Seems to be a permanent special. I've now lost several customer brake jobs to this. I have a few customers who only come to us for oil changes because we are less cost  than the dealer, but go to the dealer do fluid exchanges, etc, because they are less cost. Mainly on  Honda-Toyota makes. It appears they use only "C" level techs to get the labor cost way down. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/3/2019 at 9:32 AM, Joe Marconi said:

Steve Jobs of Apple, Howard Shultz of Starbucks, Warren Buffet of Berkshire Hathaway, and coutless other successful business people all preach....focus on quality and value, not price.  Price is what you pay....Value is what you get.  

I know I'm late to the conversation, but I'm surprised that it's still going on. This seems to be an issue that never ends. Price vs. Quality. While in theory it sounds good, there are parts of the country where the theory of "provide a superior service and the good customers will find you" just isn't true. I am in that part of the country. WHY am I...? Well that's a different story for a different thread, but bottom line is poor decisions, trusting the wrong people (read: family) and owning property (vs renting or leasing) - when poorly located - is not always better. I would have closed the doors years ago if I could have simply walked away with my tools and skills, but can't when you own the property. But my point is, the high and mighty who say "I am the best and brightest and I can demand my price because ____ fill in the blank, and if a customer can't see that well then I don't need them" are a very exclusive bunch. MOST shops simply cannot say that - we DO need them, unfortunately, and sometimes even they are hard to find and get. Wow, I dream of being able to say that, but the truth is some/many people just CAN"T afford your "best and brightest superior skills". That location and community of customers is a dream for many of us, so we really cant relate. It's the same reason there are Thousands of Wal-Marts for each Nordstroms. As quoted on here somewhere, Mr Walton saying people will travel to save money. Heck how many of us will pick the gas station a mile down the road to save .02/gallon! 

The ad for the $99 brake service is so common around here in Metro St. Louis
 area - EVERY chain had a similar promo. Midas, Meineke, Car X, Firestone, Dobbs....They ALL cater to the price shopper and then switch it up. Customers have been trained to consider this normal. Just like Auto Zone has convinced the customer that everything can be diagnosed - FOR FREE - by simply plugging in on the parking lot and POOF- diagnosed. People have been trained, and they walk in EXPECTING that we are going to conduct business the same way. "Brakes are how much?!" and "You charge to diagnose it?!" One independent shop - in most cases - cannot change an entire culture. MOST customers really look at one thing - weather buying toilet paper, a new roof for their house or brake service, and that's PRICE. All of these things are commodities to them, not luxuries. Despite our inherent need to justify our blood, sweat, tears, training, tools, sacrifices, etc...MOST customers just don't care. They want the best price. And for most of us, as also noted on here, even getting a fair markup on parts is becoming nearly impossible as customers literally google parts prices WHILE your going over the details of the repair with them. It's amazing. And, many customers WILL drive away over the cost of a repair if they think you're too high. And that will be what they tell their friends and their neighbor - as he's installing the water pump for them in their driveway that they went and purchased at Auto Zone for less than half of what I would have needed to sell it to them for. They simply don't understand overhead, expenses, training, insurance, work comp, taxes. They just don't. And, likely they'll be in the next week, with bolts cross threaded, pump leaking, still broke, wanting me to "fix" his "repair" because they don't want to go back to him, and I have to tactfully refuse in most cases. It's a lose/lose - first I was too high, now I'm an arrogant jerk for not helping them. If you're in a niche market that can support superior, excellent service and you can send the price shoppers away - be thankful!! Some must play the game that has been so heavily marketed to our customer base - like it or not, some of us must find a creative way to deal with it and eek out a profit. It isn't easy, And many fail, but it is a necessary evil for many of us, or just like the brick and mortar stores of all kinds that have gone away, we will be next.Granted, as stated I am in the absolute worst possible location in America to operate a legitimate business - 31 long, hard, lean years now has proven that,so I am jaded, and I've finally convinced myself it might be time to let go and come to work for one of you guys who planned and located better, but surely I can't be alone in my position. The pie in the sky Apple, Starbucks, etc philosophy just doesn't always work. At least not here. So we keep on keeping on trying to do the right thing while playing the game that's been forced on us until we can find someone to buy our property.

On 11/3/2019 at 9:32 AM, Joe Marconi said:

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi GENUINE, I respectfully have to disagree with some of your comments and I'll tell you why.
To start, let me tell you that after reading your entire post, you basically said that the "pie in the sky.... philosophy just doesn't always work".

Henry Ford said it best. "No matter if you think you can or you can't, You're right!"

With respect to customers "in your market" you said...
"While in theory it sounds good, there are parts of the country where the theory of "provide a superior service and the good customers will find you" just isn't true. I am in that part of the country."

I have two comments. 
1) You get what you attract. 
2) People are all "wired" the same (we've been that way for 1,000's of years) and I don't think all the people in your market are different. 

People do respond - if you present the offer correctly, and no, it's not about price. 
It's about value. 

I DO agree when you say "All of these things are commodities to them, not luxuries." I get it. Auto service HAS become a commodity to most. Again, that's why it's up to you to demonstrate the VALUE. 

You also commented "If you're in a niche market that can support superior, excellent service and you can send the price shoppers away - be thankful!!" Again, it's the way those shops sell their services and build the value. 

Look, I'm not here to start an argument and I'm not trying to "sling mud". I'm only commenting that I've helped hundreds of shop owners dig out of this "way of thinking" and start selling value as opposed to price. 

Then, they take their happy customers and leverage them for reviews and customer referrals. The good ones bring more of the good ones. (Birds of a feather... - ring a bell?)

And seeing that you've been in business as you claim for 31 years, I don't think you would have stayed at it if you were missing a lot of meals, right? 

Look, I understand that everyone's situation is different but it's not an answer to say that "all your customers are cheap". The answer is about firing the bad ones and attracting the better ones by selling and demonstrating value. 

Hope this helps!

Matthew
"The Car Count Fixer"
 

P.S.: Join me on YouTube at Car Count Hackers! FREE Help to grow your Car Count, Income and Profit!

P.P.S.: This may help you outline VALUE offers - ** FREE DOWNLOAD - My Kick-Butt Offers

P.P.P.S.: Get GO-MO 2 WAY TEXTING FREE!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@GENUINE - I work with JustTheBest and I can tell you that he knows what he is talking about, but I also know that you are 100% correct.  Good customers are not everywhere, some places do have too much low-ball competition and there simply are not enough good customers to go around in some areas.  You presented your REAL WORLD facts and JustTheBest presented fancy buzzwords but you are both right.  For example, on the point of Henry Ford, his words were correct, but he operated a business on a far grander scale than most of us will ever achieve.  And that gave him great opportunities that we will never have. 

I know two things from experience,

1) You will get a lot of "hate" and negative feedback telling you that you are wrong, that you can change your situation and your customers if you want to, if you try hard enough, if you put in enough effort, if you try this latest fad advertising. 

2) I have been exactly where you are and deal with exactly what you express that you deal with.  I have overcome some of it, but some of it I simply do not have the means, methods, opportunities or privileges to use to overcome.  So in some ways, I can, in other ways, like you, through situation and circumstance, I simply can't.  Not because I think I can't but because I do not have the means, opportunities or privileges to do so. 

For example. let's say even though you own your property, let's say you are renting, as I am, even if you wanted to move and you have the money to move and the bank approval for a purchase price that is at a level that is competitive, ALL of that is you thinking that you CAN, However, if there is no property available to buy that will allow your repair shop business (in my community it is not only "industrial" zoning but it also has to be approved for auto repair) then you CAN'T.  You CAN'T not because you think you can't but because you do not have the privilege or opportunity.  Sure, you "can" move your shop 100 miles away where there are buildings for sale, but that is not a wise opportunity or truly feasible unless you truly want to start over from scratch.  However that was of little concern to Henry Ford, he didn't have to move his family or his business, he just moved a manufacturing facility or a dealership or an office complex, he moved a fraction of the operation, not the entire operation.  That is where you are 100% correct, "The pie in the sky Apple, Starbucks, etc philosophy just doesn't always work, not at the small level of most independent repair shops. At least not here." And no matter how accurate JustTheBest and Henry are, it does not apply and does not change anything in your situation. 

 

I have worked with JTB for several years and he and I have disagreed on things and I had doubted other things would work but tried them anyway.  The things I tried usually worked and had positive ROIs, some much to my surprise.  Some didn't work very well (only X/10% ROI positive) while others worked extremely well and were 10, 20, 30x ROI positive.  I have flat out refused to try some things because they cut against my personal beliefs.  While I would not say they were dishonest, they were not consistent with who I am.  Other things I have declined to try simply because they are not conducive to my business, like pushing LOFs HARD.  I lose money on every one compared to selling that rack time for a full rate parts & labor job since I am a one man shop.  If I was a big enough operation to have a dedicated LOF rack and tech, it would be a different deal, but I am not. So I "can" push LOF's hard and fill my day with oil changes, but I CAN'T make any money at them.  That is not me thinking I can't that is just cold hard reality,  Just like it is with you in your situation. 

 

So I suggest you "man up," put your flame suit on and be prepared to get torched with all these "The pie in the sky Apple, Starbucks, etc" philosophers.  Not all are that way, but enough are and they are happy to tell you, "You can, but only if you are willing to work hard enough," not recognizing that you are working hard enough, you just don't have the right resources to draw from or build with.  Others will tell you, "I was in your shoes, this is what I did and it will work for you, but only if you do it EXACTLY AS I DID."  You and I both know that just because it worked in their shop doesn't mean it will work with yours.  But there is still a great deal of knowledge here and JustTheBest has a lot of great ideas and systems to try, some you will stick with, others you might try and decide you either don't have the time to work or the interest in spending the money for help to do.  But don't give up.  You can't get blood from a turnip, but that doesn't mean you can't make it into a decent meal.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/15/2020 at 5:53 PM, Joe Marconi said:

 Don't give up on value. The reason why independent shop can charge a higher price for a brake job, for example, is because the the value they bring to their customer."

 

Not being a smart-A, but can you give an example of how you think we add value to the brake job so we can charge more?  If the dealer is offering OE pads and rotors, it's not in the quality of the part, because the customer still sees OE as higher quality, just more expensive.  We can't offer it necessarily on warranty, because the dealer offers a warranty too.

 

So just what do you think that we add to the equation that the dealer does not?  I know my customers prefer my shop over the dealers or national chains because of the personal relationship.  They are dealing with the owner and my sense of morals and ethics not a soulless business operating under "business ethics." "Because we add value" is a nice buzzword phrase, but as Genuine wrote, most customers simply do not care, they look at the bottom line.  Yes we need to build a sense of value in their minds, but just how do you propose to do it?  Not theoretical, abstract, generic allusions, but specific examples please.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/16/2020 at 11:37 PM, TheTrustedMechanic said:

@GENUINE - I work with JustTheBest and I can tell you that he knows what he is talking about, but I also know that you are 100% correct.  Good customers are not everywhere, some places do have too much low-ball competition and there simply are not enough good customers to go around in some areas.  You presented your REAL WORLD facts and JustTheBest presented fancy buzzwords but you are both right.  For example, on the point of Henry Ford, his words were correct, but he operated a business on a far grander scale than most of us will ever achieve.  And that gave him great opportunities that we will never have. 

I know two things from experience,

1) You will get a lot of "hate" and negative feedback telling you that you are wrong, that you can change your situation and your customers if you want to, if you try hard enough, if you put in enough effort, if you try this latest fad advertising. 

2) I have been exactly where you are and deal with exactly what you express that you deal with.  I have overcome some of it, but some of it I simply do not have the means, methods, opportunities or privileges to use to overcome.  So in some ways, I can, in other ways, like you, through situation and circumstance, I simply can't.  Not because I think I can't but because I do not have the means, opportunities or privileges to do so. 

For example. let's say even though you own your property, let's say you are renting, as I am, even if you wanted to move and you have the money to move and the bank approval for a purchase price that is at a level that is competitive, ALL of that is you thinking that you CAN, However, if there is no property available to buy that will allow your repair shop business (in my community it is not only "industrial" zoning but it also has to be approved for auto repair) then you CAN'T.  You CAN'T not because you think you can't but because you do not have the privilege or opportunity.  Sure, you "can" move your shop 100 miles away where there are buildings for sale, but that is not a wise opportunity or truly feasible unless you truly want to start over from scratch.  However that was of little concern to Henry Ford, he didn't have to move his family or his business, he just moved a manufacturing facility or a dealership or an office complex, he moved a fraction of the operation, not the entire operation.  That is where you are 100% correct, "The pie in the sky Apple, Starbucks, etc philosophy just doesn't always work, not at the small level of most independent repair shops. At least not here." And no matter how accurate JustTheBest and Henry are, it does not apply and does not change anything in your situation. 

 

I have worked with JTB for several years and he and I have disagreed on things and I had doubted other things would work but tried them anyway.  The things I tried usually worked and had positive ROIs, some much to my surprise.  Some didn't work very well (only X/10% ROI positive) while others worked extremely well and were 10, 20, 30x ROI positive.  I have flat out refused to try some things because they cut against my personal beliefs.  While I would not say they were dishonest, they were not consistent with who I am.  Other things I have declined to try simply because they are not conducive to my business, like pushing LOFs HARD.  I lose money on every one compared to selling that rack time for a full rate parts & labor job since I am a one man shop.  If I was a big enough operation to have a dedicated LOF rack and tech, it would be a different deal, but I am not. So I "can" push LOF's hard and fill my day with oil changes, but I CAN'T make any money at them.  That is not me thinking I can't that is just cold hard reality,  Just like it is with you in your situation. 

 

So I suggest you "man up," put your flame suit on and be prepared to get torched with all these "The pie in the sky Apple, Starbucks, etc" philosophers.  Not all are that way, but enough are and they are happy to tell you, "You can, but only if you are willing to work hard enough," not recognizing that you are working hard enough, you just don't have the right resources to draw from or build with.  Others will tell you, "I was in your shoes, this is what I did and it will work for you, but only if you do it EXACTLY AS I DID."  You and I both know that just because it worked in their shop doesn't mean it will work with yours.  But there is still a great deal of knowledge here and JustTheBest has a lot of great ideas and systems to try, some you will stick with, others you might try and decide you either don't have the time to work or the interest in spending the money for help to do.  But don't give up.  You can't get blood from a turnip, but that doesn't mean you can't make it into a decent meal.

Wow, so well said on every level ThetrustedMechanic. Thanks for such a well written reply! It doesn't help pay the bills but knowing I'm not completely crazy or alone in my circumstance does ease that "turnip stew" a little. And I have spoken with JTB - and have his book. Nice guy, well intentioned, and many of his methods may work in many places...I just can't explain it, nor does anyone believe it unless they've walked a mile in my shoes....I operate in that corner of the twilight zone where things just do not react like the rest of the world. I'd pay dearly if someone could come in and change it and prove me wrong! I'd like to retire on an up note! Best success to you as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/17/2020 at 12:37 AM, TheTrustedMechanic said:

@GENUINE - I work with JustTheBest and I can tell you that he knows what he is talking about, but I also know that you are 100% correct.  Good customers are not everywhere, some places do have too much low-ball competition and there simply are not enough good customers to go around in some areas.  You presented your REAL WORLD facts and JustTheBest presented fancy buzzwords but you are both right.  For example, on the point of Henry Ford, his words were correct, but he operated a business on a far grander scale than most of us will ever achieve.  And that gave him great opportunities that we will never have. 

I know two things from experience,

1) You will get a lot of "hate" and negative feedback telling you that you are wrong, that you can change your situation and your customers if you want to, if you try hard enough, if you put in enough effort, if you try this latest fad advertising. 

2) I have been exactly where you are and deal with exactly what you express that you deal with.  I have overcome some of it, but some of it I simply do not have the means, methods, opportunities or privileges to use to overcome.  So in some ways, I can, in other ways, like you, through situation and circumstance, I simply can't.  Not because I think I can't but because I do not have the means, opportunities or privileges to do so. 

For example. let's say even though you own your property, let's say you are renting, as I am, even if you wanted to move and you have the money to move and the bank approval for a purchase price that is at a level that is competitive, ALL of that is you thinking that you CAN, However, if there is no property available to buy that will allow your repair shop business (in my community it is not only "industrial" zoning but it also has to be approved for auto repair) then you CAN'T.  You CAN'T not because you think you can't but because you do not have the privilege or opportunity.  Sure, you "can" move your shop 100 miles away where there are buildings for sale, but that is not a wise opportunity or truly feasible unless you truly want to start over from scratch.  However that was of little concern to Henry Ford, he didn't have to move his family or his business, he just moved a manufacturing facility or a dealership or an office complex, he moved a fraction of the operation, not the entire operation.  That is where you are 100% correct, "The pie in the sky Apple, Starbucks, etc philosophy just doesn't always work, not at the small level of most independent repair shops. At least not here." And no matter how accurate JustTheBest and Henry are, it does not apply and does not change anything in your situation. 

 

I have worked with JTB for several years and he and I have disagreed on things and I had doubted other things would work but tried them anyway.  The things I tried usually worked and had positive ROIs, some much to my surprise.  Some didn't work very well (only X/10% ROI positive) while others worked extremely well and were 10, 20, 30x ROI positive.  I have flat out refused to try some things because they cut against my personal beliefs.  While I would not say they were dishonest, they were not consistent with who I am.  Other things I have declined to try simply because they are not conducive to my business, like pushing LOFs HARD.  I lose money on every one compared to selling that rack time for a full rate parts & labor job since I am a one man shop.  If I was a big enough operation to have a dedicated LOF rack and tech, it would be a different deal, but I am not. So I "can" push LOF's hard and fill my day with oil changes, but I CAN'T make any money at them.  That is not me thinking I can't that is just cold hard reality,  Just like it is with you in your situation. 

 

So I suggest you "man up," put your flame suit on and be prepared to get torched with all these "The pie in the sky Apple, Starbucks, etc" philosophers.  Not all are that way, but enough are and they are happy to tell you, "You can, but only if you are willing to work hard enough," not recognizing that you are working hard enough, you just don't have the right resources to draw from or build with.  Others will tell you, "I was in your shoes, this is what I did and it will work for you, but only if you do it EXACTLY AS I DID."  You and I both know that just because it worked in their shop doesn't mean it will work with yours.  But there is still a great deal of knowledge here and JustTheBest has a lot of great ideas and systems to try, some you will stick with, others you might try and decide you either don't have the time to work or the interest in spending the money for help to do.  But don't give up.  You can't get blood from a turnip, but that doesn't mean you can't make it into a decent meal.

 

I've learned a few things on my own, but this:

Not because I think I can't but because I do not have the means, opportunities or privileges to do so. 

This is probably the most accurate phrase I've read in a while.

 

But you know what I did have when I didn't have means, opportunities or privileges?  I had time to pick a discipline and learn it.  Then I enacted it.

 

While I let that run it's course, I found the next thing I knew nothing about and couldn't afford an expert, I learned that to the best of my ability and enacted it.

 

I've run this gauntlet for almost 12 years now over 3 locations and on the brink of watching it all vanish at least twice in those 12 years.

 

Through those trials were and sometimes still are a sh*tload of tears, but tomorrow is always a new day and as long as I conducted myself with integrity today... I'll sleep just fine.

 

Not to discount Genuine, location surely is a strong variable in success, but that doesn't mean you can't find a form of success in a sh*tty location.

I've done it, with the most laughable budget known to man and in a miserable part of town all by making a plan and enacting it one day at a time. Plan has a fault? Something doesn't work? Adjust. Repeat.

 

Some of the best advice I ever got was exactly this:  Your shop is no different than a factory, a factory has to have X level of output to be sustainable.  Your shop has to reach X level of output just like the factory does.  I'm not going to tell you how to do it, but if you want to survive you have to have to figure out how to do it.

I had never thought about shop output as related to factory output.  That seed is what lead me to charging for diagnostic and thorough inspections.  But I didn't wake up the next day and go full rate.  I worked my way there.  Finding my footing along the way and over delivering to my customers in every way possible.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/16/2020 at 9:57 PM, JustTheBest said:

Hi GENUINE, I respectfully have to disagree with some of your comments and I'll tell you why.
To start, let me tell you that after reading your entire post, you basically said that the "pie in the sky.... philosophy just doesn't always work".

Henry Ford said it best. "No matter if you think you can or you can't, You're right!"

With respect to customers "in your market" you said...
"While in theory it sounds good, there are parts of the country where the theory of "provide a superior service and the good customers will find you" just isn't true. I am in that part of the country."

I have two comments. 
1) You get what you attract. 
2) People are all "wired" the same (we've been that way for 1,000's of years) and I don't think all the people in your market are different. 

People do respond - if you present the offer correctly, and no, it's not about price. 
It's about value. 

I DO agree when you say "All of these things are commodities to them, not luxuries." I get it. Auto service HAS become a commodity to most. Again, that's why it's up to you to demonstrate the VALUE. 

You also commented "If you're in a niche market that can support superior, excellent service and you can send the price shoppers away - be thankful!!" Again, it's the way those shops sell their services and build the value. 

Look, I'm not here to start an argument and I'm not trying to "sling mud". I'm only commenting that I've helped hundreds of shop owners dig out of this "way of thinking" and start selling value as opposed to price. 

Then, they take their happy customers and leverage them for reviews and customer referrals. The good ones bring more of the good ones. (Birds of a feather... - ring a bell?)

And seeing that you've been in business as you claim for 31 years, I don't think you would have stayed at it if you were missing a lot of meals, right? 

Look, I understand that everyone's situation is different but it's not an answer to say that "all your customers are cheap". The answer is about firing the bad ones and attracting the better ones by selling and demonstrating value. 

Hope this helps!

Matthew
"The Car Count Fixer"
 

P.S.: Join me on YouTube at Car Count Hackers! FREE Help to grow your Car Count, Income and Profit!

P.P.S.: This may help you outline VALUE offers - ** FREE DOWNLOAD - My Kick-Butt Offers

P.P.P.S.: Get GO-MO 2 WAY TEXTING FREE!

 

 

Hello @JustTheBest, Thanks for your response as well. You and I have spoken in the past and I do appreciate your insight and experience. Let me pick your brain just a little more, and maybe throw my details out there for public input! Hopefully someone can see this from the outside and offer me an insight that I'm missing. "Can't see the forest for the trees" scenario.  I built this shop in 1998 (was operating out of another facility "in town" since 1989 before this). This was literally a brand new, "state of the art" shop (now built on the outskirts of town), on a main thoroughfare (17,000 car count per day) connecting the major metro of downtown St.Louis (5 miles west-I can see the Arch from my lot) and several thriving, prosperous communities 5+ miles to the east. We are 1/2 mile off of an interstate running north and south as well. BUT, the dilemma is what lies within that 5 mile radius. The local community that we are within, is literally one of the poorest communities in the state. Median annual income well under 20k. We knew this when building but had a plan. We had served - for a decade prior - essentially the same community at our other shop IN the heart of the city. While sustainable, we felt that we had maxed out our potential for any growth and were bound by our location. We were not going to be able to draw customers from surrounding, more affluent areas, INTO this poor, dangerous city for auto service other than our personal friends. The surrounding communities had plenty of shops.  Our strategy was, building on this main thoroughfare (less than two miles from the other shop) we were close enough to retain our current customer base AND grow exponentially from being located where 17,000 + cars would pass us each day. Very convenient, optimally visible, easy and ideal for commuters passing by to and from work.  On paper it looked great.

Since then we learned several things. Here's the consolidated situation 1) Less than two miles is sometimes enough to prompt many customers within our current customer base to NOT follow you. 2) Our local customer base was still working on the same, very low income and my competition locally is still the junk yard and the jack-leg working in his driveway. 3) This brand new, beautiful, clean building "Looked expensive" and kept many locals from coming in. New and existing customers both. I was told this many times. (and, yes we did have to adjust pricing some to afford this new facility). 4) The more affluent commuters that we were banking on, would NOT - despite the brand new, beautiful, clean facility - venture off of the main road to take a chance on this new shop in the "ghetto". We could not - and still cannot overcome that stigma.

Over the next 20+ years the immediate community has dwindled - significant population losses -  and exit, leaving many vacant homes and failed businesses. Within eyesight now are 3 "pay by the hour" motels, an ugly gas station, many vacant homes and lots, a closed school, and 2 salvage yards. For years we did what we could to fight both battles where it seemed most practical, but neither has been successful enough. Every day is still a struggle and no solution seems to work as intended. Several great fleet accounts have kept us going, but the battle is wearing us down. Just not worth the effort anymore, it seems.

So, how does one market THIS situation? I am completely open to any and all suggestions and/or thoughts on this situation. 18 years or so ago, I spent almost $10k for a management course in California called Management Success ($8k + two trips to their place in CA) who said "every community can be marketed to - you just have to know what buttons to press". It sounded great, and that's the impression I get from many on here, but I still haven't found those buttons. As I said I am that one place in the Twilight Zone where nothing applies.

My wife's solution: It's time to try and sell the place and MOVE. Let's try it someplace different or get out all together. I'm ready to accept her advice, but I'd like to hear some input from others who may have overcome similar odds.

 

Thanks, all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm willing to work with you, if you're interested.  No games, no gimmicks.  Complete and holistic evaluation with a structured action plan.

 

It won't be easy, changes recommended can be relatively cheap all things considered, but there will be work involved.

 

There are a fair amount of shops in your area (2 mile radius) and A LOT more just over the river. I see nothing but potential.  Just need someone willing to do some work and some improvements.  The only money I envision you spending is upgrading your website, the rest of what you will need can be done mostly from a computer with some time, effort and follow through.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi GENUINE! Thank you for your response and I will tell you that I’ve read it 3 times just to be sure I didn’t miss anything. 

In short, I understand your struggles and I’m NOT dismissing anything you’ve said.

In my own defence, you may find I don’t ‘beat-around-the-bushes’. I’m pretty direct and don’t typically ‘sugar-coat’ things. If that offends anyone - I apologize in advance. I mean no harm. 

From what you’ve described, I don’t think you really have the time to sit around the camp fire and have one of those should-a - could-a - would-a - discussions - but that’s entirely up to you. 

My approach is somewhat different. 

WIth that said, you may call this rather ‘direct’ and to the point. It may make you uncomfortable to respond to this publicly and I don’t necessarily expect you to. For that reason, I’m following this post up with a direct message to you.

To cut to the chase, my first question would be “what was the last time you did any type of advertising campaign?” That could be typical postcards, val-paks, or even a facebook posting. 

Next, can you share what that offer was? Do you have a copy of the actual ‘whatever-it-was’ you did? Postcard copy? Val-pak? 

Thirdly, I would be interested in knowing how many contacts (customers) you have on file. Now just before you scream out numbers that are as long as telephone numbers… I’m talking about the number of customers you’ve had IN YOUR SHOP in the last 90-180 days. 

So you  know, I’m asking that for a couple of reasons. On average, 10% of America moves every month. People in your database older than 180 days (6 months) may still be customers - but your information is probably not up to date. 

So I’ll let you determine what that actual “real customer count” is. 

Just for clarification, so many times I get on the phone with shop owners and when I ask that question, they tell me they have 2,000, 3,000, 5,000 or even more (like one guy told me he had 18,000 customers on file!) 

My response - if you have that many customers, what are we doing talking about it? 

The truth is, they may have that many NAMES, but that’s it. They aren’t customers. 

I would like to know a couple of other details (again, I’m not expecting you to share them here in public) like your ARO (Average Repair Order) and if you have any specialties or profitable services. 

So now, here’s my offer. 

I am prepared to work with you totally free. Yes, I mean that. No ‘send-me-money’ or anything like that. There’s no catch; no tricks; no gimmicks. 

Well, actually, there IS a catch. 
Actually 5 of them.

1-YOU have to invest the time - I am thinking about 1-2 hours but that will depend on you. 

2- You have to follow my blueprint. In other words, do what I show you to do. Just to confirm, I’m not going to ask you to do anything weird or anything (like dress up in a chicken suit and walk the streets with a sandwich board sign)

3-You have to be prepared to act now - like in the next week or so.  (The reason I say that is if it’s important enough to you - you’ll do it. If it’s not, then it’s not that important and that’s fine too - you can debate it for as long as you want to.) 

4-I ask that you share your results with me. No, I’m not going to ask you “how much money you made” or anything like that. I’m just interested in numbers like how many RO’s and total value - things like that. 

5-I ask that you don’t expect miracles. I’m not THAT good! ;) If the details of "where you are" are what I expect, I’m going to tell you that you’ve got work ahead of you. I’m prepared to start the snow ball rolling - I’m not saying it’s an avalanche, okay?

And that’s it. We could talk about it - or we could do it - and since I’m prepared to put my money where my mouth is - I leave it TOTALLY UP TO YOU to decide.

See, that wasn’t too hard, was it? 

Hope this helps! Just let me know because right after I post this - I’m sending you a message on this forum. 

Matthew
“The Car Count Fixer”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partner, Shop Boss Tom Petty discusses the critical importance of technical training in the automotive industry. By addressing the skills gap, developing young talent, investing in continuous training, and embracing technological advancements, the industry can ensure a skilled and competent workforce ready to tackle the challenges of modern automotive technology. Tom Petty, Petty Motorworks, Waretown, NJ. Tom's previous episodes HERE Show Notes
      The importance of technical training (00:00:06) Tom Petty emphasizes the need for shop owners to be engaged in creating a culture of technical training. The changing automotive industry (00:00:27) The automotive industry is rapidly evolving, and in-house training and mentorship are crucial for staying competitive. Cultivating young talent (00:02:18) Establishing apprentice programs and developing young individuals with the right skills and attitude for the automotive industry. Building a supportive network (00:05:12) The importance of collaboration and support among local automotive shops to develop and nurture young talent. Identifying and nurturing talent (00:07:21) Recognizing individuals with basic skill sets and natural aptitude and cultivating them into valuable technicians. Challenges in the industry (00:08:51) The industry's failure to focus on education and talent development leading to frustration and departure of potential talent. Thanks to our Partner, Shop Boss Shop Boss – Shop Management Software built by shop owners, for shop owners. It works the way you need it to, right out of the box. Find on the web at https://shopboss.net Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Virtual Toastmasters Club: https://remarkableresults.biz/toastmasters -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections  
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      The Weekly Blitz is brought to you by our friends over at Shop Marketing Pros. If you want to take your shop to the next level, you need great marketing. Shop Marketing Pros does top-tier marketing for top-tier shops.
      Click here to learn more about Top Tier Marketing by Shop Marketing Pros and schedule a demo:https://shopmarketingpros.com/chris/
      Check out their podcast here: https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/
      If you would like to join their private Facebook group go here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/autorepairmarketingmastermind
      In this podcast episode, Chris Cotton from Auto Fix Auto Shop Coaching offers valuable insights for auto repair shop owners. He emphasizes the importance of reflecting on the first half of the year and preparing for a successful second half by recognizing achievements and overcoming hurdles. Chris provides actionable steps such as revamping marketing strategies, investing in team training, and enhancing customer experience. He stresses the significance of setting clear goals, implementing strategic changes, and maintaining accountability. The episode concludes with gratitude to listeners and a reminder to stay positive and proactive in business endeavors.
       
      Supercharge Your Auto Repair Business (00:00:01) Introduction to the podcast episode and a brief overview of what to expect. Mid-Year Reflection (00:01:06) Reflecting on the first half of the year for auto repair shop owners and setting the stage for the second half. Assessing First Half Performance (00:02:11) Reviewing achievements and setbacks in the first half of the year for auto repair shops. Overcoming Personal Roadblocks (00:03:15) Identifying and addressing internal barriers that may have held back the shop's performance. Setting Clear Goals (00:05:23) Discussing the importance of setting ambitious and measurable goals for the second half of the year. Actionable Steps for Improvement (00:07:21) Providing eight actionable steps for auto repair shop owners to consider for business growth and improvement. Accountability and Monitoring (00:13:01) Emphasizing the importance of tracking progress, reviewing key performance indicators, and holding oneself and the team accountable. Seeking Support for Business Growth (00:15:01) Highlighting the value of seeking support, collaboration, and learning from a network of like-minded individuals for business success.  
      Connect with Chris:
       
      [email protected]
      Phone: 940.400.1008
      www.autoshopcoaching.com
      Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
      AutoFixAutoShopCoachingYoutube: https://bit.ly/3ClX0ae
       
      #autofixautoshopcoaching #autofixbeautofixing #autoshopprofits #autoshopprofit #autoshopprofitsfirst #autoshopleadership #autoshopmanagement #autorepairshopcoaching #autorepairshopconsulting #autorepairshoptraining #autorepairshop #autorepair #serviceadvisor #serviceadvisorefficiency #autorepairshopmarketing #theweeklyblitz #autofix #shopmarketingpros #autofixautoshopcoachingbook
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Changing The Industry
      When A Customer Tries To Bring You Their Own Spark Plugs #carrepair
    • By Changing The Industry
      Changing Lives Through Associations #podcast #automotivebusiness #carrepair
    • By Changing The Industry
      Can You Have Heart In A Business? #podcast #automotivebusiness #carrepair #autorepairbusiness


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...