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Let’s look at sports for a minute. Take for example two premier quarterbacks. Both equally talented and both equally successful. While they play the position according to the rules of football, neither quarterback plays the position exactly the same. The inherent differences between them allows them to bring out their personal best. They draw upon their uniqueness, which translates into their individual strengths. In essence, this is what makes them great, but different.

 

It’s the same for your technicians, and in fact, for all your employees. Years back I tried to mold my employees to follow a strict set of rules and guidelines. I soon realized that although we need policies and procedures, being different is ok, and doing things differently is ok.

 

With regard to employee management: Set the parameters of your business, establish each job role and clearly describe each position, set the goals for each position, and then let the employee flourish by allowing the employee to bring their uniqueness to their role.

 

Oh, one more thing. Not doing things your way is not the end of the world either.

 

Thoughts?

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