Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • AutoShopOwner

      Advertising & Promoting Your Company On AutoShopOwner - Information   02/25/2017

      This message is only shown to FREE members and goes away after subscribing to a paid membership. If you are joining AutoShopOwner to promote your business, service, or product to this community of auto shop owners, please subscribe to a Sponsor Member Annual Package before doing so. With the correct membership, you will have the ability to post about your company in your posts and forum signature.

      You can upgrade your existing membership here.

      All marketing attempts to this community without proper membership level and/or approval by staff, will be considered spam, result in topic/post removal, and a warning, which can lead up to the banning of your membership, company and/or product on all pages of AutoShopOwner.

      Thank you for your support.

Recommended Posts

This week has brought our shop more than our fair share of ups & downs. Some big jobs have gone on through completion without so much as a hiccup, while some small jobs have seemed to be nothing more than a painful distraction from "real" business. This one story, though...I really need some encouragement. Please tell me where we've gone wrong, or how we might boldly change our process to avoid these situations, because I've heard just about enough from whiny, underhanded customers.

 

The facts:

 

A gentleman brought his vehicle in because he claimed he was hearing a squeaky noise. He couldn't tell us anymore except that he though it was brake-related. He made it sound as though it pierced his eardrums and woke the neighbors. Anyhow, we road tested the vehicle, only to find that we weren't in fact, hearing any squeaking. His brake inspection revealed 2 things. First, his front brakes had been recenlty serviced. There were new rotors & new pads (along with a fair share of dust). The rear brakes had LONG since been serviced, and the pads were at 2-3mm, with sever piutting/grooving on the surfaccr of the rotors.

 

The recommendation:

 

We told him we didn't hear the squeaking, however, noted the new brake parts in the front, along with the excessive brake dust. He only acknowledged that he had the brakes serviced recently somewhere else. We told him that as a part of the brake inspection, we used our shop air to blow out the loose dust, and told him that if he was certain that the noise he was hearing was in his front brakes, to take it back to where he had them serviced, as there may be an eligible warranty service due him. As for his rear brakes, we shared the measurements, and he approved the installation of rear pads & rotors. We performed the service, and off he went.

 

The followup:

 

We called him as a matter of protocol the following week. He acknowledged that the squeak seemed more persistant, and was unhappy that we didnt take care of it. We empathized with him, and encouraged him to come back for a free road test/reinspection, thinking that if it was more persistant, it would mke the noise while he rode with us. He seemed ok with that and schduled the appt for today.

 

The comeback:

 

He didn't show up. He didn't call. He didn't answer the phone when we called back. He hasn't responded to our voicemail message.

 

The review:

 

He posted a low review for us online indicating that he came to us because he told us his front brakes were making noise, and we sold him work that didn't take care of it, and that he "probably didn't need at all".

 

 

 

So....did we do something wrong? Should I have been adamant about the obviously cheap pads the other shop used? Should I have mentioned that we don't install "economy" brake parts? How about the response to his review? I've decided that I don't want him to come back, based on either a complete lack of respect for how hard we work, or out of genuine ignorance to the way things work.

 

Someone else gets to do the brake service, but WE get a low review because we can't hear the squeak?

 

Someone...please tell me if I'm crazy here, because I'm getting ready to put on my angry eyebrows and post a response to his review...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By Stevens Automotive Service
      Take a look at this short video on marketing to the new generation. You may find it very interesting !
      https://www.concentrix.com/resource/video/we-are-not-all-broke/
    • By Joe Marconi
      I recently made a call to my Internet provider to discuss and issue I was having. After multiple attempts at trying to explain my problem, the customer service rep on the other end of the phone had no clue how to solve my problem.  She was nice, extremely polite, and had the voice of an angel.  She was well-trained, but not in the art of problem solving.
      Great customer service is not about being nice to people, it’s all about understanding the customer’s needs and coming up with solutions to their problems.  Train your service personnel in the art of proper etiquette, but also in the art of problem solving.  Empower your people to also make decisions.  Set limits, but give them the authority to solve issues without every problem reaching your desk.
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      I’ll never forget the day when Mrs. Obrien brought her car back for me to look at.  She was furious. I stayed late the night before, well into the night, to finish her car so she could have it for work the next day.  I even did a few little things on the house because I felt she may be a little inconvenienced picking the car up so late.
      Why did she bring the car back?  A comeback?  Well, not in the conventional way. It was the greasy smudge on her seat that she was angry about.  
      But what about me staying late? Or giving away a few minor services? Doesn’t that count?  She is upset about a grease smudge? Oh yes, and she has every right to be.
      The fact is, you can do the best repair, using the best parts, performed by the best technician on the planet. But what the customer sees is not necessarily your hard work, it’s that little greasy smudge that you are judged by.  Unfortunate and unfair?  Yes. But it’s a reality.
      Perform the best repairs and provide world-class customer service; and never forget; it’s the little things the customer sees. And that’s what important to them.
    • By Joe Marconi
      It’s easy to get sucked into the drama and the negativity of your worst customers. For some reason, no matter how hard you try, there will be some people that you will find impossible to please. My advice: stop trying.
       
      I am not suggesting that you ignore all problem customers. That goes with the territory. What I do suggest is that you don’t ignore your BEST customers. Pay a lot of attention to them.
       
      Educate your customers; explain the reasons why you are suggesting certain repairs or services. However, you will find that devoting your time and energies to your best customers will bring you a lot more happiness and add a lot more to your bottom line.
       
    • By Joe Marconi
       
      Source: Use technician comebacks and customer service issues to learn and improve


×