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Joe Marconi

Catch People Doing Things Right! - A lesson from the One Minute Manager

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If you have not read “The One Minute Manager” by Ken Blanchard, you should. And, if you have read it, and it was a long time ago, read it again. It’s a short book you could probably read in a weekend. But don’t let the size of the book fool you. This book is as good as any other book when it comes to employee management.

 

For me, the biggest lesson from the book is to “catch people doing things right” and praise them for it. Too often we focus on what goes wrong. While you need to address mistakes, slipups and errors, you should put more emphasis on what goes right. This will lead to people “wanting” to repeat that same behavior. Why? Simply because you took the time to recognize them.

 

So, start today…go out in the shop, walk around, and find someone doing something right and praise them for it!

 

 

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