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I have preached on these forums, at my shop, to my coaching clients and at seminars that price is not the major deciding factor with regard to consumers. Well, I need to restate that comment. For some people, it is.

 

I have a customer that constantly complains that my prices are too high, that I am higher than the dealer, that he can get the same parts on line for less, etc, etc, etc.

 

After a 20 minute battle over the price of a catalytic converter, trying to point out all the benefits of why we are his best choice, I asked him, “Is price your only concern when it comes to your car?” He sternly replied, “YES!”

 

So, I told him, “Well, then we can’t do business, please pay me for what you owe me up to this point, pick up your car, and good luck to you.”

 

I felt uneasy after I hung up the phone, not just because of this one person, but for the many out that have no real understanding or respect for what we do.

 

How would you have handled this situation?

 

BTW: I gave the guy multiple options, explained the difference in parts and also called the dealer to see what the price would be for the job. We were not higher.

 

 

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