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I have been a believer in hiring entry level techs. We have a balance of seasoned veterans and newbies. Years back (and I am talking decades here) I would hire a young kid out of trade school and although he did not have the years behind him, he had a great foundation. They worked on the family cars, in gas stations or tire shops after schools and on weekends and gained valuable experience by the time they entered the work force.

These days, many of the techs that graduate tech schools don't have the basics. Many of them are technically-potential. By that I mean many of them have an understanding about how to approach a diagnostic issue. But, basic skills are lacking.

 

I think the biggest problem is that when asked where did they worked, many of them tell us: Camp counselor, the local deli, pizza shop.

 

Some have done internships. I think many programs require this. But I just don't see that well-rounded background in mechanics that we had years back.

 

I think that if a young person is interested in this trade, he or she should work in as early on as possible.

 

 

 

 

 

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