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Joe Marconi

Cardone Part Failures: Rack and Pinions

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We have seen an unusual high failure rate of steering racks recently; three in the last few months. The rebuilder of the racks is Cardone. Sorry Cardone, you may not like this post or my opinion. But I have had it with doing jobs over again and over and damaging my reputation in the process.

 

I know these are rebuilt units. I know Cardone has a long history in the industry. I have bought their products for decades; but not anymore. The cost of comeback is too great these days. The loss of revenue is one thing; the loss of a customer's confidence is even greater. And let's not forget the customer's safety.

 

I was on vacation in Chicago when I got a frantic email from my customer, a women who lost her steering over the Labor Day Holiday. We installed the rack last week and she picked up her car this past Friday.

 

Again, Cardone, are you listening: "Lost her steering".

 

There have been other issues with Cardone steering racks in the past. And I don’t think this is an anomaly. Other shops are experiencing the same issues.

 

We need to have faith in the parts we purchase. The motoring public must have faith in us; if that the trust is broken we all fail.

 

There’s no other way to put it: Comebacks kill.

 

 

 

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