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Joe Marconi

Is Technician Pay an Issue attracting people?

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According to Zip Recruiter, tech pay on average is about $41,000 per year.  Is this an issue?   I know many of you pay more than average, but do you think that we need to increase tech pay in order to attract more people to the auto repair industry.   One other thing to consider, the shop and shop owner needs to be profitable and make the money first in order to pay anyone a decent wage.

Your thoughts?  

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      Your thoughts?
       
       
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