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gandgautorepair

Opening on Saturdays

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We are currently not open on Saturdays, but I'm thinking about it. I wonder how many of you are open on Sat and how it works for you, what your thoughts are. I've always appreciated the model of having a business that was closed evenings and weekends, and it's nice for the employees. However, we're trying to maintain a higher level of gross sales with more employees and I'm trying to keep an open mind. I went from 2 techs and a lube tech and one service advisor with a CRM, to 3 techs plus lube tech and two service advisors on May 1st. We've done well for the summer, but I'm nervous about keeping everyone busy through the slower season. Also, going forward with the challenges we'll face in coming years I'm wondering if being open on Sat will give us an advantage. Welcome any input.

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