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Joe Marconi

A healthy repair shop business starts with a healthy mind and the right people

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The day to day operations of running a business can take its toll on anyone.  To be a business owner means to address problem after problem and finding the right solutions. Sometimes the decisions we make will be the right ones, sometimes not.  If we are not careful, this emotional roller coaster we call being in business, can make us focus too much on the negative, and not the positive things that happen in our lives.

With nearly 4 decades as a business owner, I can say with certainty that one of the basic building blocks of being successful in business is having the right team of people around you and getting yourself in the right frame of mind. 

You need to find and hire great people. But once you have them, you need to do all you can to take care of them, train them and make them successful in order for you to be successful. Is it easy? No. But it is essential.

Most important; you need to treat each day as if it were a gift from the heavens and base your entire perspective from a position of strength and remaining positive.  I know it’s not easy, but I can tell you, it works.

 

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      Our team at Elite is excited to announce that we're now offering online peer groups for shop owners through an all-new service: Elite Synergy Groups.
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      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on July 31st, 2019


      View full article
    • By Joe Marconi
      We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 
    • By Joe Marconi
      I remember being at a meeting with my staff where I voiced my opinion on an important issue. When I was finished, I asked if everyone was in agreement. Everyone nodded their heads yes. 

      After the meeting, one of my service advisors told me that half of the employees did not agree with me.  When I asked why did they agree, he replied. “You’re the boss, you intimidate others.”

      This made me think about my leadership style.  Being unapproachable will prevent you from hearing other opinions; which is important to the success of the company.

      When speaking with your employees, ask a lot of questions. Avoid giving your opinion until you have heard from others.  Praise suggestions and the opinions of others, and thank others for speaking up.

      The most successful teams are those that build strategies through a collective effort.


       
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