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Everywhere I look I see that I'm supposed to target 60% gross profit.  Am I supposed to include tires in this?  I have no problem getting 60% on repairs, but when I include my tire sales then it just tanks it.  About 15% of our sales is tires.  Is anyone getting 60% GP including tires?  If so, I need to make some adjustments.

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