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Signed up for yelp a few months ago. I see alot of leads coming through Kukui and have sold ~10k or so through them. My biggest complaint currently is my SA's getting annoyed by the barrage of messages/calls from people wanting their 20" impala wheels powdercoated or their suburban seats reupholstered or a starter for a kia optima. About 1/30 leads are even worth answering. I suppose a lead is a lead at the end of the day. Were at the ~675/mo tier.

 

Whats everyones experiences... 

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Edited by RobMax

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