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totalautocare

Where to find techs and advisors

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We've placed ads and spent $1000's between monster. Com, indeed. Com and Craigslist and we simply cannot find experienced techs or writers. Suggestions?

 

We simply can't find them. It's like hide and seek.

 

Thoughts? Strategies?

 

Sent from my SM-T800 using Tapatalk

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