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MINI4U

Holiday Bonus

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We have for the last 7+ years gave out a $100.00 bonus for Christmas to all our employees. It never changed because our revenue never changed. This year we got a new service writer and he knows how to sell. Not only have we made over $200,000 more than the last 7+ years (in 9 months!) but also shop moral is way up so the techs are producing better. We definitely want to go up on our bonus any recommendations? Currently the service writer gets a bonus on sales monthly and he techs get extra pay for production.

 

 

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