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mspecperformance

Do you always get signed authorization for work to be performed?

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Running into an issue lately. Most of the work we do the customer drops off the car and we give them a call after. Generally we usually send them our findings via e-mail or text from our inspection report and then we discuss the recommended work. Customer authorizes over the phone, we do the work, they pick up. Done deal.

 

Normally we have no issues... normally I mean years I have never encountered a problem. Recently working with a knuckle head and he is claiming he didn't authorize some work to be done. He also never signed an estimate due to all correspondence through telephone. Also to keep in mind most of my tickets are $1000+ and I have not had any issues thus far. This is situation is causing me to rethink my procedures. Unfortunately having a customer authorize via signature can be difficult due to customers going to work, going away, living far enough distance from the shop etc. What have you done in your shop? Obviously there are state laws and such to consider as well...

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