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Perhaps one of the most difficult things to do as a shop owner is to consistently present yourself with a positive and upbeat attitude. Let’s face it; your life is filled with issues; from bounced checks to complaining customers, to comebacks and employee problems.

 

But the fact is you are the boss and the leader of your company. And everyone is watching you. What you do and what you say is seen and heard by everyone. As the leader, you set the tone, the mood and morale of the shop.

 

If you are negative, everyone around you will be. One of the best ways to lead is to set an example by being positive at all times. I know this may be hard at times, but to walk around with a doom and gloom attitude will actually makes things worse.

 

People react to the emotions of the leader. It’s far better for the long term success of the company to have the people in your shop feeding off your positive energy, then being brought down by doom and gloom.

 

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      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on July 6, 2018


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