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Joe Marconi

2014; it's the end of a year, not the end of your journey

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2014 is coming to a close. Most of you by now are already shifting your thoughts to 2015, which is good. Take a look back on 2014; check to see what you have accomplished and what you did not get to. Don’t just use this knowledge as a score card, but rather to plan what you will need to do in 2015. Set your new goals with deadlines and use the past to spring-board you into the future.

 

You will always have obstacles to overcome. That’s called…life. But business, as in life, is not a destination, but a journey. And just like any journey, it’s the experiences you encounter on the way and how you react and learn from those experiences that really matter.

 

Remain positive in 2015, dismiss negative thoughts and dream big. Remember, what you can conceive you can achieve!

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